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Reversing Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

The Right Diet For Prediabetes

A prediabetes diagnosis can be alarming. This condition is marked by abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) most often due to insulin resistance. This is a condition in which the body doesn’t use insulin properly. It’s often a precursor to type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with prediabetes are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. With prediabetes, you may also be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, a prediabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you will definitely get type 2 diabetes. The key is early intervention; to get your blood sugar out of the prediabetes range. Your diet is important, and you need to know the right kind of foods to eat. How diet relates to prediabetes There are many factors that increase your risk for prediabetes. Genetics can play a role, especially if diabetes runs in your family. Excess body fat and a sedentary lifestyle are other potential risk factors. In prediabetes, sugar from food begins to build up in your bloodstream because insulin can’t easily move it into your cells. Eating carbohydrates doesn’t cause prediabetes. But a diet filled with carbohydrates that digest quickly can lead to blood sugar spikes. For most people with prediabetes, your body has a difficult time lowering blood sugar levels after meals. Avoiding blood sugar spikes can help. When you eat more calories than your body needs, they get stored as fat. This can cause you to gain weight. Body fat, especially around the belly, is linked to insulin resistance. This explains why many people with prediabetes are also overweight. You can’t control all risk factors for prediabetes, but some can be mitigated. Lifestyle changes can help you maintain balanced blood sugar levels as well as a healthy weight. Watch carbs with Continue reading >>

Apps To Help Prevent & Reverse Diabetes

Apps To Help Prevent & Reverse Diabetes

According to the Center for Disease Control and prevention, it’s estimated that 86 million Americans have prediabetes, a condition of high blood sugar levels that could turn into type 2 diabetes within 5 years. But studies have shown that prediabetes (and even full-blown Type II diabetes) can be reversed or prevented through healthy diet and exercise. In a TEDx talk at Purdue University, Dr. Sarah Hallberg cited that as much as 50% of the population could have insulin resistance to some degree even if their blood sugar levels still test normal. With insulin resistance, insulin cannot process the high amounts of sugars and carbohydrates, and the glucose gets stored as fat. As a society, a lot of our diet is made up of carbohydrates — from potato chips and pretzels to bread, pasta, rice and more. Add in the sugars from desserts and store-bought snacks and the hidden sugar in condiments like ketchup, and it's easy to exceed the USDA's recommended 225 grams of carbs per day. Over time, this can cause a condition called insulin resistance or prediabetes. Dr. Hallberg cites success in reversing pre-diabetes and Type II diabetes with a low sugar, low carbohydrate diet. And she’s not alone. There is a wealth of studies supporting her findings (see an overview of the efficacy of low-carb diets by the American Diabetes Association). So when I was diagnosed with prediabetes, I knew that it was time to seriously change the way I ate. I chose a diet high in vegetables, protein and healthy fats and low in starch and sugar (i.e., a low-carb diet). In search of information, recipes, and support, I found the four apps that were the key to my success — Low Carb Info, Carb Counter & Diet Tracker by Atkins, Calorie Counter & Diet Tracker by MyFitnessPal, and MyDietician. MyDieticia Continue reading >>

Reversing Prediabetes

Reversing Prediabetes

Prediabetes can be reversed, and you don’t have to do it alone. The CDC-recognized National Diabetes Prevention Program can significantly reduce the risk of ever developing type 2 diabetes. For more information, visit the CDC's Prediabetes, Diabetes, and Your Health page. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes?

Prediabetes?

Season 2 Videos Prediabetes: Are You Aware? You’ve Got Prediabetes. What Now? What Are Health Care Professionals Doing? Family Mealtime Makeover Put Prediabetes in Reverse (30 seconds) Joan’s Personal Story Could You Have Prediabetes? Reversing Prediabetes Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

Reversing Effects Of Prediabetes

Reversing Effects Of Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the condition where your blood sugar is higher than normal, but not quite high enough to be classified as diabetes. Many adults are unaware that they have prediabetes, as the symptoms may not be very noticeable. However, if left unchecked, prediabetes can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. The good news is that you can take control of your condition and reverse the effects and risks associated with prediabetes by following the steps below. If you are over 45 years of age, are overweight, and lead a sedentary lifestyle, then you are especially at risk for developing prediabetes. Combat this and reverse the side effects and associated risks by implementing the following lifestyle changes. Lose weight: Having a healthy weight can help you control and regulate your blood sugar levels. This weight loss does not have to be drastic, as losing just seven percent of your body weight can be effective in reducing the effects of prediabetes. These numbers translate to losing just 14 pounds for a 200-pound individual. Change your diet: Your diet has a huge impact on your overall health, and changes to what you eat can help prevent and reverse prediabetes. Choose fresh produce over processed foods and treats, and try filling your plate in sections. Half should be comprised of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, and asparagus, with one quarter making up starchy foods like potatoes, corn, or peas, and the remaining quarter consisting of lean protein like chicken or fish. Try to avoid foods heavy in carbs like pastas, as they can raise your blood sugar. This tip goes hand in hand with losing weight, as eating a well-balanced and healthy diet will aid in your weight loss goals. Exercise: Adding exercise into your daily routine Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

Pre Diabetes Diet Plan

It’s estimated that almost 50% of the American population has diabetes or prediabetes – a condition where blood sugar is higher than normal levels. It is accompanied by insulin resistance, a risk factor for full-blown diabetes, and other health complications. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data estimates the recent prevalence of total diabetes, diagnosed diabetes and undiagnosed diabetes’ US trends to be 12-14% among US adults. So, neither should you shrug off your doctor’s advice, nor should you be taking your elevated blood sugar levels lightly. Generally, the power of a pre-diabetes diet plan, for getting those numbers back on track, is underestimated. Prediabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood sugar levels range from 100 to 125 mg/dl, or hemoglobin A1C levels range from 5.7 to 6.4%. One needs to undergo regular prediabetes tests to be sure. But, with the right pre-diabetes diet plan, one starts to feel the difference in their energy levels soon enough. MORE: Take the Prediabetes Risk Test This is a chance to take control. Simple and daily lifestyle changes, like a balanced diet and regular exercise, that help you lose weight go a long way towards warding off the risk of progressing to full-blown type 2 diabetes. Pre-Diabetes Diet Plan: Changes You Need To Make Today If you already have pre-diabetes, you are likely to develop type 2 diabetes (T2D) within the next 10 years unless you make some changes, starting from today. It’s time to adopt a new pre-diabetes diet plan built on some basic principles: Don’t Skip Breakfast You may barely make it to office on time, but that doesn’t mean you skip breakfast. That means you wake up earlier! A healthy breakfast starts your day on the right note. It gives your metabolism the kick-sta Continue reading >>

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Stopping Prediabetes In Its Tracks

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Nearly 20 million Americans are headed down the road to diabetes, but modest weight loss and a bit more activity would be enough to turn them around. These people have prediabetes, meaning their above-normal blood sugar levels signal a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next 10 years. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. A combination of obesity, inactivity and genetics is responsible. But most people with prediabetes aren’t aware they have it, and insurers may not cover testing for or treatment of the condition. “It’s really quite a remarkable opportunity, but it’s not as if everyone is rushing to be identified,” says Dr. Daniel Einhorn of the Scripps Whittier Institute for Diabetes in La Jolla, Calif. Many people may be reluctant to get tested — and labeled — especially if they’re feeling fine, he adds. But catching the condition before it turns into full-blown diabetes can be a lifesaver. People with Type 2 diabetes either lose the ability to respond to insulin, or their bodies no longer make enough of the hormone. Insulin helps the body use glucose as fuel, so without it sugar builds up in the bloodstream. Over time, especially if blood sugar levels are not kept in check, diabetes can boost a person’s risk of heart disease and cause damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and other body tissues. Prediabetes used to be called impaired fasting glucos Continue reading >>

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

The New Way To Reverse Your Diabetes Risk That Really Couldn't Be More Simple

Clark knew it was time for a blood sugar rewind. The best part? Her numbers qualified her for a local, yearlong Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), an innovative, research-proven plan involving smart, doable lifestyle changes that reverse prediabetes. This intensive program is now offered by YMCAs, hospitals, churches, community centers, and workplaces across the nation. With 4 months of weekly classes, plus 6 to 8 months of motivational follow-up meetings, people learn how to make essential diet and exercise changes. And the results happen fast. "It's a new way of living. My husband has lost even more weight than I have." "It's all about making small, sustainable tweaks. Research suggests that losing even 5% of your weight is the tipping point for seeing results. That's lifesaving news," says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, national health officer at the YMCA of the USA. The Drug-Free Plan One in three American adults has prediabetes. Yet just one in nine knows it, according to the CDC. That means millions are missing out on the opportunity to become the boss of their own blood sugar—naturally. The DPP works better than a drug. In fact, in 2002, the National Institutes of Health stopped the original DPP study early because healthy lifestyle changes worked so much better than the participants' drugs that the researchers wanted everyone to switch over. In 2011, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute scientists who tracked just over 200,000 people for 11 years found that five factors—nutritious food, regular activity, a healthy weight, minimal-to-moderate alcohol consumption, and no smoking—cut diabetes risk by 84% for women and 72% for men. "It's powerful," says Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, medical director of the obesity clinical program and director of the inpatient diabetes Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

You Can Avoid Pre-diabetes With Small Changes To Your Diet

Charity Diabetes UK estimates that up to 11.5 million people in the UK are at a high risk of developing it. This statistic is backed up by research published last year in online medical journal BMJ Open which estimates a third of UK adults are at the stage known as pre-diabetes. If you’re one of them or think you might be, the main thing to know is that pre-diabetes can be reversed. In fact, it takes only simple lifestyle changes to cut your risk of going on to develop Type 2 diabetes. So what does the term mean? Although not a medically recognised condition, pre-diabetes is a term used when a person’s blood glucose levels are higher than normal, yet not high enough for the full diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes. Being told you have pre-diabetes serves as a warning that you’re at increased risk of developing the condition. It has other health implications, too, for example it raises risk of cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and stroke. Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations Wed, June 28, 2017 Incredible celebrity weight loss transformations. If you’re diagnosed with pre-diabetes (also called impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance) but don’t have any signs of Type 2 diabetes, you’re likely to be seen every one to three years by your doctor, depending on your blood sugar levels. Now’s the time to take steps to reduce your risk. Diabetes UK is encouraging people to find out their level of risk of developing Type 2 and whether they have pre-diabetes. There is a quick Know Your Risk quiz on the charity’s website (diabetes.org.uk/risk) or you can check at your pharmacy or GP surgery. If you do discover you’re at risk, it means you’ll be able to get support and regular check-ups from your doctor. The biggest risk factor for Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Prediabetes

How To Reverse Prediabetes

The statistics are staggering. About a third of all Americans (79 million) have a condition known as prediabetes, in which the blood sugar values are above the normal range but don’t rise to the level of full-blown type 2 diabetes. Many prediabetics don’t know they have the disease and go on eating unhealthy food and forgoing exercise that can ultimately lead to worsened disease. These patients with prediabetes have a little bit of insulin resistance, which causes greater than normal blood glucose levels and which sets the stage for type 2 diabetes and the complications that come out of having the disease. Recent research, published in The Lancet, a major medical journal, showed that prediabetics that had at least a single normal blood glucose reading, were 56 percent more likely to prevent their turning into type 2 diabetics in the next six years. According to experts in disease prevention, having prediabetes should be considered as a chance to take control over your destiny and to turn back the process that is causing the prediabetes to turn into diabetes. There are simple lifestyle techniques that you can involve yourself in that will significantly lessen the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the upcoming years. Lifestyle changes are even better than taking metformin, which is a common treatment for both diabetes and prediabetes. Things you Can Do There are things you can do that will decrease your chances of developing type 2 diabetes and that can reverse prediabetes. All of them are simple to do and can make the difference in your having a healthy and long life versus having a short-lived and disease-ridden life. Here are some things you can do: Lose some weight According to a recent research study called the “Diabetes Prevention Program Study”, eating Continue reading >>

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

How To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes – The Quick Start Guide

It’s possible to simply reverse type 2 diabetes. There are only two things you need to do. By reading this brief post you’ll know what they are, and how to get started. Or skip ahead to the two steps right away > Quick start Twenty years ago, when you bought a brand sparkly new VCR machine, you would also get a thick instruction manual. Read this thoroughly before you start, the manufacturer would implore. There would be detailed setup procedures and troubleshooting guides. Most of us ignored the manual, just plugged it in and tried to figure out the rest. That’s why we all had the blinking 12:00 on. Today, most new electronics now come with a quick start guide which has the most basic 4 or 5 steps to get your machine working and then anything else you needed, you could reference the detailed instruction manual. Instruction manuals are just so much more useful this way. Well, I don’t know much about VCRs, but I do know about type 2 diabetes. I can write an entire book about obesity (oh, wait, I did that already), or fasting (oh, wait, coming up) or type 2 diabetes (next up for 2018). But many of you will not want to go through the entire instruction manual. So this is the quick start guide for reversing your type 2 diabetes. A fully reversible disease Most doctors, dietitians and diabetes specialists claim that type 2 diabetes is a chronic and progressive disease. The American Diabetes Association, for example, almost proudly proclaims this on its website. Once you get the diagnosis, it’s a life sentence. But, it’s actually a great big lie. Type 2 diabetes is almost always reversible and this is almost ridiculously easy to prove. This is great news for the more than 50% of American adults who have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or diabetes. Recognizing thi Continue reading >>

Reversing Prediabetes

Reversing Prediabetes

Nobody likes to be told that they have prediabetes. But such a diagnosis doesn’t mean nothing can be done. A new study from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom has found that adults who lose weight or reduce their waistlines within a year of receiving a diagnosis of prediabetes are significantly more likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than adults who don’t. The researchers analyzed data from 817 people with a mean age of 60 (53% were women). Within the group, 68% had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), 18% had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), and 14% had both. (IGT and IFG are signs of prediabetes.) The subjects were screened for diabetes every year for five years (unless they developed diabetes before then). After one year, more than half (54%) of the patients had returned to normal glucose tolerance. About 40% still had impaired glucose tolerance and about 6% had developed Type 2 diabetes. The most interesting finding was that participants who had lost 3% of their body weight or lost more than 3 centimeters (slightly less than 1 1/4 inches) around their waistlines within the first year were twice as likely to return to normal glucose tolerance than those who didn’t. The participants who regained normal glucose tolerance at the one-year mark were also more likely to remain free of diabetes than those who still had impaired glucose tolerance after a year. The lead researcher on the study, Danielle Bodicoat, PhD, summed up her team’s findings by saying, “This study emphasizes the importance of encouraging people with raised glucose levels to make health lifestyle choices…. Losing weight or reducing your waist circumference may be the most important part of this.” Want to learn more about prediabetes? Read “Prediabetes: What to Know” Continue reading >>

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

The 4 Common Mistakes All Prediabetics Must Avoid To Prevent Diabetes

Just a “little touch of sugar?” iStock/stocksnapper If you’re among the 79 million Americans with prediabetes—higher-than-normal levels of blood sugar, which boost your risk for full-blown diabetes and related health problems—don’t shrug it off. New research published in the journal The Lancet found that prediabetic patients who had at least one normal blood sugar reading, even for a short period of time, were 56 percent more likely to avoid progressing to diabetes during nearly six years of follow-up after the study. In other words, “This is your chance to take control,” says Matt Longjohn, MD, MPH, senior director of chronic disease prevention for the YMCA-USA. “Research proves that some simple, daily lifestyle changes can dramatically cut the risk for developing diabetes over the next couple of years by 58 percent, which is better than what is seen with frequently prescribed medications like metformin.” The key? Avoid these four roadblocks between you and a healthier future. iStock/martinedoucet The landmark Diabetes Prevention Program study, which followed 3,234 people with prediabetes for three years, revealed that everyday changes—switching up their eating habits and adding more physical activity—helped participants lose a little weight. Trimming just 5 percent to 7 percent of their body weight (that’s 12.5 pounds for a 180 pound person) and exercising slashed the odds for developing full-blown diabetes by a whopping 58 percent. This helps trim abdominal fat—the deep belly fat that settles in your torso, wraps itself around your internal organs, and even invades your liver. It messes with your liver’s ability to regulate blood sugar by pumping out inflammation-boosting compounds that make your body stop obeying insulin. Smart Move: St Continue reading >>

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