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Red Wine And Type 1 Diabetes

Red Wine Antioxidant Might Help Diabetics' Arteries

Red Wine Antioxidant Might Help Diabetics' Arteries

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The antioxidant resveratrol -- found in red wine, peanuts and berries -- might improve the health of blood vessels in people with type 2 diabetes, a small study suggests. The study found that resveratrol supplements lessened artery stiffness in some people with type 2 diabetes. Stiffening of the arteries, called arteriosclerosis, raises the risk of heart attack and stroke. "In treatment with resveratrol among people with diabetes, there was a trend toward improvement in the stiffness. And in people with higher stiffness there was more of a benefit," said lead researcher Dr. Naomi Hamburg. She is chief of the vascular biology section at Boston University School of Medicine. While the research suggests there might be ways to improve blood vessel abnormalities in people with type 2 diabetes, it's too soon to recommend resveratrol for that purpose, said Hamburg. "We would need a longer study to look at whether this is going to reduce heart attacks and stroke," she added. "But I think this is evidence to support future research." For now, Hamburg said, "the overall recommendation is to have a diet that's rich in fruits and vegetables." As you age, your arteries stiffen, which can lead to an increased risk of heart disease. In people with type 2 diabetes and obesity, this process starts earlier and can have more severe consequences, she said. The body's largest artery is the aorta, which carries blood from the heart toward the rest of the body. For the study, the researchers measured the aortic thickness of 57 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 56 and obese, on average). The investigators also conducted tests to measure blood-vessel health. Some patients were given resveratrol supplements, while the others were given a placebo. Overal Continue reading >>

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

Red Wine 'benefits People With Type 2 Diabetes'

A glass of red wine a day can improve cardiac health and help manage cholesterol for patients with type 2 diabetes, according to findings in a 2-year study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. Moderate alcohol consumption has been linked to improved cardiovascular and total mortality rates, and a glass of red wine a day as part of a healthy diet has been considered beneficial for some time. There is evidence that type 2 diabetes is less prevalent among moderate drinkers, yet the risk-benefit balance is controversial for such patients, due to a lack of long-term randomized studies. Researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev-Soroka Medical Center and Nuclear Research Center Negev, Israel, wondered if both red and white wine might improve glucose control, depending on alcohol metabolism and genetic profiling. Previous research has suggested that ethanol (alcohol) is the key, meaning that alcoholic drinks other than red wine could be equally beneficial; others claim that red wine has particularly advantageous properties. Potential benefits for people with type 2 diabetes People with diabetes have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease, as well as lower levels of "good" HDL cholesterol. High levels of HDL cholesterol can reduce the risk for heart disease and stroke, as it absorbs cholesterol and carries it back to the liver, where it is flushed from the body. 29.1 million people in the US probably have diabetes, or 9.3% of the population 21 million have been diagnosed An estimated further 8.1 million have not been diagnosed. Should patients with type 2 diabetes be recommended to take up moderate alcohol consumption? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) leave the decision to the individual; the American Heart Association (AHA) recommen Continue reading >>

Cooking With Alcohol

Cooking With Alcohol

If you have diabetes and you decide that you want to have an occasional alcoholic drink, it is important that you talk with your doctor first to determine if it is safe for you to do so. Alcohol in mixed drinks, wine, or beer can affect blood sugar levels (blood glucose levels) differently. How alcohol affects you depends on whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, which medications you are taking, and the level of your diabetes control. Before drinking, make sure you know how alcohol affects you and your diabetes. And of course, please be smart and stay safe. However, what about cooking with alcohol? This seems to be of concern to some of you since we use alcohol in some of our diabetic recipes. Alcohol boils at a lower temperature than water so much of the alcohol used in cooking is burned off, leaving only the flavor of the wine, beer, or spirits used. The list below shows the percentage of alcohol remaining in food after cooking, and it's based on research by the United States Department of Agriculture. Our dietitian uses this information in determining the nutritional analysis and exchanges of any recipe in which we call for alcohol. You might find the results interesting and helpful in your cooking of other recipes which include alcohol. Alcohol added to boiling liquid and removed from the heat: 85% of alcohol remains Alcohol used to flambe a dish: 75% of alcohol remains Alcohol stirred in and baked or simmered for: 15 minutes: 40% of alcohol remains 30 minutes: 35% of alcohol remains 45 minutes: 30% of alcohol remains 1 hour: 25% of alcohol remains 1 1/2 hours: 20% of alcohol remains 2 hours: 10% of alcohol remains 2 1/2 hours: 5% of alcohol remains Alcohol Substitutions in Diabetic Recipes What if you and/or your doctor decide that you should not coo Continue reading >>

Metabolic Changes Leading To Type 2 Diabetes May Be Prevented By Red Wine

Metabolic Changes Leading To Type 2 Diabetes May Be Prevented By Red Wine

(RxWiki News) Red wine has been shown to have certain health benefits, including protection against heart disease. Now, it appears that a compound found in red wine may protect against type 2 diabetes. A compound called resveratrol may protect against harmful changes that lead to type 2 diabetes in obese people. Such harmful changes include insulin insensitivity (when the body no longer responds to the hormone that controls blood sugar) and high blood pressure. "Resveratrol could become a way to fight diabetes." Past studies have shown that resveratrol helps obese mice live longer by improving aspects of their health such as blood sugar control. Patrick Schrauwen, Ph.D., of Masstricht University in the Netherlands, and colleagues wanted to see if the compound had similar effects in humans. Before developing diabetes, a person's body will go through various metabolic changes - meaning that the way the body processes food and energy will change. The body may no longer respond to insulin (a hormone that regulates blood sugar); fat may build up in the liver; blood sugar levels may rise. The earlier studies on mice showed that resveratrol protected obese mice from many of these metabolic changes. To see if the compound works for humans, the researchers gave 11 obese men a daily dose of resveratrol or placebo for about four weeks. None of the men had a family history of diabetes or any other endocrine disorder. The men who received resveratrol showed many signs of improved metabolic health. In fact, the researchers write that resveratrol may lead to metabolic changes similar to the effects of reducing calories or endurance training. The study showed that men who took a daily resveratrol supplement improved many measures of their metabolic health, including a reduction in bloo Continue reading >>

Drinking And Diabetes: Lessons Learned In College

Drinking And Diabetes: Lessons Learned In College

WRITTEN BY: Molly Johannes The following post is shared by a College Diabetes Network (CDN) student, involved in CDN’s Student Advisory Committee (SAC). The College Diabetes Network provides programs for young adults with diabetes to help make their college experience safer and more successful. In September 2011, I started college at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. I’ll never forget the range of emotions I felt when my parents dropped me off: anxious, excited, anxious, scared, anxious, curious … and did I mention anxious? A reason why I was so nervous was that going off to college represented my first true taste of independence. I would be a full 90 minutes away from my parents, who have acted as key teammates in my diabetes care and management over the years. It wasn’t like I was starting this academic and social pursuit freshly diagnosed; after all, I’ve had diabetes since I was 4 years old. Growing up with it made me accept it as my reality early in life, and I never really minded it. It started to become a worry, though, when I was hit with the realization that I had to immerse myself in an unfamiliar environment, away from my parents and healthcare team who knew me and my diabetes best. I wondered, “Can I do this?” Fortunately, my schedule was so full, so quickly, that I barely had time to dwell on my concerns. I attended my classes, bonded with my roommate, established a diverse friend group, experienced the culinary offerings of the dining halls, stressed over homework assignments, and tried new group fitness classes at the gym, among other things. Best of all, my newfound friends didn’t seem to mind my diabetes at all — they asked me endless questions and thought nothing of it when I whipped my insulin pen out in the dining halls to bo Continue reading >>

Does White Wine Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics?

Does White Wine Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels In Diabetics?

The polyphenols in red wine may help prevent metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes by helping your body regulate blood-sugar levels and fat metabolism, according to a January 2011 “Food and Function” study. White wine also contains such polyphenols, but in much smaller amounts. Recommending any type of wine to help control diabetes is premature and, under certain circumstances, is risky. Video of the Day Any type of alcohol, including white wine, can cause hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, immediately after consuming it and for eight to 12 hours after drinking, according to the American Diabetes Association. If you choose to drink white wine, check your blood glucose before sipping it and also eat while or before you drink it. Also drink your wine only when your blood-glucose levels are under control and consult a doctor before you incorporate white wine into your diet, recommends the association. The symptoms of hypoglycemia and drunkenness are similar – disorientation, sleepiness and dizziness. The ligands in red wine – mainly ellagic acid and epicatechin gallate, or ECG – have an affinity to your peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ , or PPARγ, which is a key factor in both glucose and lipid metabolism. In fact, the affinity is similar to the type 2 diabetes drug rosiglitazone, according to A. Zoechling, lead author for the “Food and Function” study. That raises the possibility that red wine might someday be used in diabetes prevention and treatment, but more research is needed. Red wines contain a much higher level of ligands than white wines. Though the amount can vary among red wines, many reds contain 1 g per liter of these polyphenols, according to "Wine Spectator" magazine. White wines, on the other hand, have less than .1 g per liter. Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Diabetes-does Red Wine Help Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Red Wine And Diabetes-does Red Wine Help Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Red wine and diabetes Well to get right into it, there’s a lot to talk about but yes red wine can help your diabetes and lower your blood sugar. But that does NOT mean drinking it in excess. An occasional glass of Merlot may protect type 2 diabetics from strokes and heart attacks. It’s all about knowledge and why red wine can be a positive for you, but also why it may be a negative as well. If you’re a diabetic your arteries can become stiff which can lead to heart disease. There is a well known antioxidant in red wine called resveratrol. Georgetown University Medical Center had research done that showed that the ability of immune molecules that were harmful in penetrating the tissues of the brain were actually reduced by resveratrol. Resveratrol is also found in dark chocolate, peanuts, raspberries, and red grapes. It also has been shown to slow down the mental deterioration in Alzheimer’s patients. But the most important fact here is that resveratrol helps in lowering your blood sugar and that’s what is important here. While there are tons of supplements and medications available today, where do you turn to? What works? What doesn’t work? My feeling is that medications just mask the problem of diabetes. The real issue is that you want to treat, control, and reverse diabetes by natural methods such as diet and exercise and not drugs prescribed by a physician. I would rather do it the natural way and supplements are great alongside eating natural healthy foods and of course regular daily exercise. That’s where red wine comes in with resveratrol. It’s a natural ingredient that not only helps with diabetes, but offers many other health benefits in addition to diabetes which I will discuss shortly. In other studies done, people who drank red wine every thre Continue reading >>

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Red Wine And Type 2 Diabetes: Is There A Link?

Adults with diabetes are up to two to four times as likely to have heart disease than people who don’t have diabetes, says the American Heart Association. Some evidence suggests that drinking moderate amounts of red wine could lessen the risk of heart disease, but other sources caution people with diabetes against drinking, period. So what’s the deal? A few words on diabetes More than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 1 in 10 people, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Most cases of the disease are type 2 diabetes — a condition in which the body doesn’t make enough insulin, uses insulin incorrectly, or both. This can cause high levels of sugar in the blood. People with type 2 diabetes must control this sugar, or blood glucose, with a combination of medications, like insulin, and lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Diet is key to diabetes management. Found in many foods such as breads, starches, fruits, and sweets, carbohydrate is the macronutrient that causes blood sugar levels to go up. Managing carbohydrate intake helps people manage their blood sugar. But contrary to popular belief, alcohol may actually cause blood sugar levels to go down instead of up. How red wine affects blood sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, drinking red wine — or any alcoholic beverage — can lower blood sugar for up to 24 hours. Because of this, they recommend checking your blood sugar before you drink, while you drink, and monitoring it for up to 24 hours after drinking. Intoxication and low blood sugar can share many of the same symptoms, so failing to check your blood glucose could cause others to assume you’re feeling the effects of an alcoholic beverage when in realit Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Alcohol

Diabetes & Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions. Alcohol can also affect diabetic nerve damage, eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. You may wonder if drinking alcohol is safe for people with diabetes. If you drink alcohol, there are some things you need to know first about alcohol safety. Is it Safe to Drink Alcohol? Check with your doctor to make sure alcohol doesn’t interfere with your medications or complicate any of your medical conditions. Drinking alcohol can lead to serious low blood sugar reactions, especially if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate the release of insulin from the pancreas. Alcohol can also affect other medical conditions you may have, like diabetic nerve damage, diabetic eye disease, and high blood triglycerides. Get guidelines for alcohol use from your medical provider. How Much Alcohol Can I Drink? If you choose to drink alcohol, drink in moderation. Limit your intake of alcohol to no more than one serving per day for women, and no more than two servings per day for men. One serving size of alcohol equals: 12 ounces of beer 5 ounces of wine 1½ ounces of distilled spirits (such as rum, whiskey, gin, etc.) Alcohol and Risk of Low Blood Sugar If you are managing your diabetes with diet and exercise alone, drinking alcohol can stil increase your risk of low blood sugars. And if you take insulin or types of diabetes pills that stimulate insulin production, drinking alcohol can lead to even more serious low blood sugar reactions. Normally, the liver releases glucose to maintain blood sugar levels. But when you drink alcohol, the liver is busy breaking the alcohol down, so it does a poor job of releasing glucose into the bloodstream. This can lead to a drop in blood sugar levels if you are drinking alco Continue reading >>

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

Does Wine Help Or Harm People With Diabetes?

With commentary from study author Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Doctors have long faced a paradox when advising their patients with type 2 diabetes on drinking alcohol. Moderate drinking has been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease, which would benefit people with diabetes who are at increased risk of the disease. Yet, people with diabetes have traditionally been advised to reduce their alcohol consumption to help better control their glucose levels. Now preliminary results of a new study presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Prague, found that adults with diabetes may be able to safely drink in moderation and reap the heart benefits. The study randomly assigned 224 patients with controlled type 2 diabetes to have either mineral water, white wine or red wine (about a 5-ounce serving of wine) with dinner every night for two years. All patients were following a healthy Mediterranean diet with no calorie restrictions. Researchers found that red-wine drinkers had a modest improvement in high-density lipoproteins (HDL), the good cholesterol, and also had improved apolipoprotein A1, a component of HDL. Those who drank red or white wine also saw modest improvements in glucose metabolism. Drinking one 5-ounce serving of red or white wine wasn’t associated with any negative effect on medication use, blood pressure or liver function tests. “Obviously excess drinking is harmful, but there is no good evidence to discourage moderate consumption among diabetics who have no other contraindication,” says Meir Stampfer, MD, DrPH, professor of epidemiology and nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study. “This first long-term large scale alc Continue reading >>

Drinking

Drinking

Your social life doesn't need to stop when you have type 1 diabetes You don’t need to stop drinking, but it is best to avoid drinking excessive amounts of alcohol, as it could cause you to have a hypo. That’s because when you drink, the liver has to stop work to break down the toxins and remove it. While your liver is doing this it can’t do all the other jobs it normally would, such as releasing stored glucose if your levels start to fall. This effect can last for many hours after you have been drinking and may continue overnight and into the next day. To avoid this, it’s recommended that you don’t drink too much in one session and have some carbohydrate to eat before or while you drink. You should also test your blood glucose level before you go to bed and eat a snack if your level is normal to low. On occasion, you may find that your blood glucose level rises too high after drinks that contain carbohydrate, such as spirits mixed with regular soft drink or large amounts of beer. Where possible, choose a diet drink as a mixer. Continue reading >>

And Diabetes

And Diabetes

Diabetes is a common, life-long condition that occurs when the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the insulin it does produce doesn’t work properly. Insulin is a hormone that transfers glucose from the bloodstream into the cells to be used for energy. If you have diabetes, your body cannot make proper use of this glucose so it builds up in the blood instead of moving into your cells. The chances of developing diabetes may depend on a mix of your genes and your lifestyle. Drinking to excess, for example, can contribute to individuals becoming diabetic. Diabetes is a manageable condition. But when it’s not well managed, it is associated with serious health complications including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, nerve damage and amputations2. There are two main types of diabetes3 Type 1 diabetes develops if the body can’t produce enough insulin, because insulin-producing cells in the pancreas have been destroyed. It can happen: Because of genetic factors When a virus or infection triggers an autoimmune response (where the body starts attacking itself). People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed before they’re 40 and there’s currently no way to prevent it. It’s the least common type of diabetes – only 10% of all cases are type 14. Type 2 diabetes. Develops when the body can still make some insulin, but not enough, or when the body becomes resistant to insulin. It can happen: When people are overweight and inactive. People who are an ‘apple-shape’ (with lots of fat around the abdomen) have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes Because of genetic factors. People who have this type of diabetes are usually diagnosed when they’re over 40, and it’s more common in men. However, more overweight children and Continue reading >>

Glass Of Red Wine A Day 'treats Diabetes By Helping Body Regulate Blood Sugar Levels'

Glass Of Red Wine A Day 'treats Diabetes By Helping Body Regulate Blood Sugar Levels'

A small glass of red wine every day could keep adult diabetes under control, scientists claimed last night. A new study found that the drink contains high concentrations of chemicals that help the body regulate levels of sugar in the blood. Just a small glass of red contained as many of these active ingredients as a daily dose of an anti-diabetic drug, the researchers found. Although the study didn't look at the effects of wine on people, its authors believe moderate drinking as part of a calorie controlled diet could protect against type 2 diabetes. However, their conclusions angered Diabetes UK who accused the researchers of making 'astonishingly bold suggestions' based on 'limited research'. The charity warned that wine was so high in calories it could lead to weight gain - outweighing any benefit. Around 2.6million people suffer from type 2 diabetes in Britain. The disease occurs when the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin - the hormone that regulates blood sugar - or when its insulin does not work properly. High levels of sugar in the blood can cause tiredness, heart disease, strokes, blindness, nerve damage and kidney disease. Past studies have shown that natural chemicals found grape skin and wine called polyphenols can help the body control glucose levels, and prevent potentially dangerous spikes or dips in blood sugar. The new study compared the polyphenol content of 12 different wine varieties. The team, from the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, found that levels were higher in red wines. The scientists then studied how these polyphenols interact with cells in the human body, focussing on a particular 'receptor - or molecule that sits on the surface of cells - called PPAR-gamma - involved in the development of fat ce Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

I Have Type 1 Diabetes. What Types Of Wine Are Safer To Drink In Terms Of Sugar Content?

Open this photo in gallery: The question I'm a 50-year-old who loves wine but also has been fighting type 1 diabetes for almost 35 years. Other than the obvious ice wines, ports, etc., are there particular grapes that could be considered higher in carbohydrate (sugar) count than others? Does red versus white versus rosé make a difference? The answer Although I've "prescribed" a few wines to physicians who've asked for recommendations, I myself am no doctor. Nor am I a chemist. So take what I'm about to say for what it's worth. You're certainly on the right track by avoiding sweet beverages such as icewine and port. Sugar is a diabetic's enemy, and those wines have plenty. When it comes to "dry" wines (I put that in quotation marks because there's always at least a trace of sugar even in the driest wines), the best choice generally is red. As a category, red wines tend to be lower in sugar than white or rosé. It all depends on the specific wine; some reds, such as Yellowtail Shiraz from Australia, are sweeter than, say, a typical white Sancerre from France. I would also go so far as to say that European reds are more likely – speaking very, very generally – to be drier that those from very sunny New World regions, such as California and South Australia. That said, the tiny differences in sugar concentration are unlikely to make much of a difference if you intend to drink no more than a glass or two over the course of a couple of hours. If you're on prescribed medication, including insulin, and I suspect you are, you should absolutely consult with a doctor or nutritionist experienced with diabetes. Health experts I've spoken with would say that sugar is not your only concern. Alcohol plays into the equation. After drinking alcohol, you may experience low blood gluco Continue reading >>

Effects Of Wine Intake On Postprandial Plasma Amino Acid And Protein Kinetics In Type 1 Diabetes1,2,3

Effects Of Wine Intake On Postprandial Plasma Amino Acid And Protein Kinetics In Type 1 Diabetes1,2,3

Abstract Background: Alcohol may impair protein turnover and insulin sensitivity in vivo. Objective: The acute effects of moderate wine intake on amino acid kinetics and on the fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of albumin and fibrinogen in patients with type 1 diabetes were studied. Design: Six patients with type 1 diabetes ingested an elementary mixed meal (46 kJ/kg) over 4 h, first without and 3 mo later with ≈300 mL red wine. Postprandial glucose concentrations were maintained at <10 mmol/L. Results: Postprandially, the FSR of fibrinogen was ≈30% greater (21.5 ± 6.6% compared with 14.1 ± 3.6% of pool/d; P < 0.01) and glucagon concentrations were ≈40% greater (103 ± 20 compared with 61 ± 13 ng/L; P < 0.015) with wine than without wine. However, the FSR of albumin and the rates of appearance of total and endogenous phenylalanine and leucine were not significantly different between treatments. First-pass splanchnic uptake (in μmol•kg−1•min−1) of dietary phenylalanine (0.22 ± 0.02 compared with 0.19 ± 0.02) and leucine (0.25 ± 0.04 compared with 0.14 ± 0.02) were greater with wine (P < 0.05), whereas dietary phenylalanine oxidation was lower with wine, by ≈25% (0.10 ± 0.02 compared with 0.14 ± 0.01 μmol•kg−1•min−1; P < 0.05). Selected amino acid concentrations were significantly lower but glutamate concentrations were significantly higher with wine. Conclusions: In insulin-infused patients with type 1 diabetes, moderate wine intake with a meal resulted in 1) a higher fibrinogen FSR, glucagon concentration, and first-pass splanchnic uptake of leucine and phenylalanine; 2) lower dietary phenylalanine oxidation; 3) selective changes in plasma amino acid concentrations; 4) and no impairment in endogenous proteolysis and albumin synthesis. Continue reading >>

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