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Recommended Blood Glucose Meters

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

World-wide annual sales of glucose meters and test-strip supplies tally up to well over 10 billion dollars each year, but with over 50 styles and brands to choose from, it can be hard to determine which meter is not only the best for your needs but also best in terms of accuracy, price, and ease of use. Thanks to Stacey Divone from The Girl with the Portable Pancreas, we got the inside scoop on the 2015 Consumer Reports review of today’s glucose meter technology. The first nine of these meters scored as “excellent” in accuracy and “above 80 out of 100” for their overall assessment. Here are the top 10 recommended meters: FreeStyle Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day FreeStyle Freedom Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day Bayer Contour Next: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $1460 at 4 strips per day Well at Walgreens True Metrix: $22 for the meter with an annual cost of $1225 at 4 strips per day Bayer Breeze 2: $25 for the meter with an annual cost of $1900 at 4 strips per day Up & Up Blood Glucose Meter from Target: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Aviva Plus: $30 for the meter with an annual cost of $2115 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Micro from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Compact Plus: $75 for the meter with an annual cost of $2030 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Ultima from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Do you use one of these top 10 meters? What are your favorite and least favorite features? Further reading on blood sugar monitoring: Continue reading >>

3 Best Blood Glucose Meters For Children

3 Best Blood Glucose Meters For Children

Here at My Blood Sugar Test, we’ve researched a range of Glucometers, focusing on user reviews, specifications and features, to determine what we regard as the 3 best Blood Glucose Meters for children currently on the market. With so many blood glucose meters available from drugstores, diabetes centres, and the Internet, it can be an overwhelming process to find the right Glucometer for you. This decision can be made even more difficult if the Glucometer is to be used by a child. Glucometers range in price and features and an accurate, cost-effective Glucometer is essential in helping to manage your child’s diabetes. Monitoring your child’s blood glucose levels will help keep their blood sugar under control and with general wellbeing. Although an adult may test a child’s blood sugar levels initially, it’s important that children learn to use the Glucometer accurately themselves and keep track of their own levels. Our research and reviews are designed to help you make an informed decision, while saving you time and money. Our reviews are not designed as a substitute for professional advice from a Doctor or Diabetes Educator. We have taken the following factors into consideration when making our recommendations: Price Ease of Use/Accuracy Size Display Memory Price Along with the initial cost of a Glucometer, it can pay to be mindful of the cost of test strips compatible with the machine you choose, which can vary significantly in price. Your child may use upwards from three strips per day for accurate readings. You may have an insurance plan that covers the cost of your Glucometer and test strips, however this is not always the case, and sometimes there may be a limit to the number of test strips. Ease of Use Convenience, ease of use and accurate readings are pa Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

A blood glucose meter is a small device that quickly measures and displays your blood glucose level. It's a great tool to help you self-monitor and manage your blood glucose. It gives you immediate results to make sure you're staying within your target range and allows you to quickly treat or react to low blood glucose levels if you're insulin dependent. Want to know how we get our review results? Check out how we test blood glucose meters. Blood glucose meter reviews Here we'll tell you: See our article for general information about diabetes. To check your blood glucose levels you'll need a blood glucose meter, lancet (finger-pricking) device and blood glucose testing strips. The process of taking a reading is quite simple. Generally all you'll need to do is: Insert the testing strip into the blood glucose meter Draw blood by inserting the lancet, loading and pricking your finger Place blood on the testing strip Take the reading You'll receive a reading in mmol/L (millimoles per litre of blood) – this is the international standard for measuring blood glucose levels. Depending on your type of diabetes and medication, you might need to check your levels at various times throughout the day (usually before meals, two hours after meals, before bed and before driving or exercise), but your health care professional will guide you on how often and when you should be checking your glucose levels. Once again your optimal blood glucose level/range will be determined by your doctor or health care professional. They determine this range by taking into consideration: the type of diabetes you have your age how long you've had diabetes the medication you take any other health conditions you have With each drop of blood your meter will give a different reading depending on when you'v Continue reading >>

Precision Xtra Glucose+ketone Meter

Precision Xtra Glucose+ketone Meter

There are a remarkable number of blood glucose monitors available on the market and the options seem to increase almost daily. I’ve listed a two options here but if you want to poke around some places like Reddit you can get a good sense of what the newest gizmos are and how they stack up to one another. If you get a glucose meter might as well get one that can also check ketones. The meters themselves are generally not that expensive, but they do get you on the purchase of the test strips, particularly the ketone strips. If you look around you can find glucose and ketone strips for a tiny fraction of what you pay at a pharmacy. Amazon also has some decent options, like this one. Dexcom Continuous Glucose monitor A very cool option, particularly for the Seven Day Carb Test, is a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) like the Dexcom model. CGM’s are typically worn on the arm for a few weeks at a time and take a blood glucose level once every minute. You can get a remarkable amount of data from these platforms and you will not need to stick your finger with each meal like you do with something like the Precision Xtra described above. I wore a CGM for two weeks during the writing of this book and it was easy and incredibly insightful. Now, for the downsides: You will find it problematic to get a CGM from your doctor UNLESS you are diabetic or pre-diabetic. Without some kind of diagnosis you may find it hard to get your doctor to write a prescription for a CGM at all, and it will NOT be covered by insurance. Due to the complete lack of market signaling (to say nothing of Moral Hazard) in a 3-party payer medical system, CGMs should cost about $50 but instead can bill for upwards of $1,000-$2,000. So, as cool as these are, you may find it tough to get one, but if you are persi Continue reading >>

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

How Often To Test Your Blood Glucose

Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when and how often to check. Checking your blood sugar, keeping a record of your results, and using your results to improve your management is an important part of having diabetes. But before you grab your meter and check your blood glucose level, ask: Why am I checking now? How will I use the information to make decisions in how I manage my diabetes? If you don't know, find out before you do a check. Our blood sugar guide answers your questions about when Continue reading >>

Create A Blood Glucose Test Schedule

Create A Blood Glucose Test Schedule

Testing your Glucose Testing your blood glucose levels can help you understand how different factors are impacting your health. Knowing how to interpret each result and how to take action is a very important part of testing. Self testing your blood glucose tells you what your blood glucose is at that time. It also lets you know how food, exercise, stress, illness or medicine affects your blood glucose. Glucose levels are affected by many factors, including the type of diabetes you have and the type and frequency of your medication. Once you and your healthcare professional establish a target range for your blood glucose, you can use the information to adjust your food, exercise or medication. Helpful recommended times to test: • Before meals: 70–130 mg/dL (5.0–7.2 mmol/L) • After meals: less than 180 mg/dL (<10.0 mmol/L) • Before or after exercise • Before bed/middle of the night • Feeling symptoms of high or low blood glucose levels • When feeling sick or under stress • Starting a new medication or adjusting current medication • When traveling A consistent testing schedule helps you keep blood glucose levels within your target range and feel your best. There is no official recommendation for blood glucose testing frequency for patients that do not take insulin; however, self-monitoring of blood glucose may be beneficial in achieving blood glucose targets. For patients that take insulin, it is recommended by the ADA (American Diabetes Association), to perform three or more blood glucose tests daily. Be sure to follow the schedule provided by your healthcare professional in order to properly keep track of the changes in your blood glucose throughout the day. To test your blood glucose level you will need: • A blood glucose meter ––––Ask your Continue reading >>

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The goal of a high-fat, low-carb diet is to get into a state called Ketosis where the body burns fat as fuel rather than using glucose as its source of energy. Types of Ketone Meters There are several types of ketone meters available that monitor ketosis in vastly different ways, some more accurate than others and some more convenient others. We’ll discuss 3 types of Ketone Meters available starting with the best on the market today in 2017. Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer The Ketonix breath analyser doesn’t use any blood glucose test or test strip, it works by analysing acetone on your breath that your body produces when you’re in a state of ketosis. The Ketonix is slightly less accurate as blood ketone and glucose meters are per test. But they are more convenient With the Ketonix, you can test yourself an unlimited amount of times, hourly if you like. Which is ideal if you want to see how various foods effect ketosis after you’ve eaten them or even the effects exercise has. The Ketonix is affordable when you take into account the price of test strips for blood monitors. (Many companies give away cheap versions of blood monitors but make their money on testing strips). The Ketonix has no test strips and requires no further outlay. Ketonix also comes with software that will keep a log and also calibrates the device to the optimal settings for your goals. If you’re trying to monitor ketones under conditions such as athletic performance, weight loss, diabetes, alzheimer’s or epilepsy. The Ketonix adjusts its settings to test whether you’re in the ideal range for that condition. The Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer is a one-off payment you can read more & check them out here. Blood Ketone Meter One of the best & most precise ways of monitoring ketosis is with a Continue reading >>

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

Monitoring Your Blood Sugar Level

What tests can I use to check my blood sugar level? There are 2 blood tests that can help you manage your diabetes. One of these tests is called an A1C test, which reflects your blood sugar (or blood glucose) control over the past 2-3 months. Testing your A1C level every 3 months is the best way for you and your doctor to understand how well your blood sugar levels are controlled. Your A1C goal will be determined by your doctor, but it is generally less than 7%. The other test is called SMBG, or self-monitoring of blood glucose. Using a blood glucose monitor to do SMBG testing can help you improve control of your blood sugar levels. The results you get from an SMBG test can help you make appropriate adjustments to your medicine, diet and/or level of physical activity. Every person who has diabetes should have a blood glucose monitor (also called a home blood sugar meter, a glucometer, or a glucose meter) and know how to use it. Your doctor may prescribe a blood glucose monitor. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved meters that work without pricking your finger. But these meters cannot replace regular glucose meters. They are used to get additional readings between regular testing. What supplies do I need? You will need a glucose meter, alcohol pads, sterile finger lancets and sterile test strips. Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for these supplies. How do I pick a glucose meter? Check with your health insurance plan to see if they will pay for your glucose meter. If so, your plan may only pay for a certain meter. If your insurance plan doesn’t pay for glucose meters, ask your doctor which meters he or she recommends. Shop around and compare costs. Consider what features are important to you. For example, some meters are Continue reading >>

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

Diabetes Educator Guide To Blood Glucose Meter Selection And Monitoring For Accuracy And Safety

The diabetes educator can play an important role in assisting patients with choosing the best blood glucose meter (BGM) to fit their needs and optimize accuracy and safety. There is a wide variety of BGMs on the market and patients are often at the mercy of their prescriber and insurance company when making a choice. In addition to teaching the patient appropriate techniques that will improve accuracy regardless of BGM, diabetes educators should address barriers (physical abilities, mental status, insurance coverage, etc.) to help patients choose a BGM with features that best support individual needs. With the typical life of a meter being 3 to 5 years, the diabetes educator’s role is critical in helping the patient select a BGM that has features that will enhance his/her care. Meter Selection To make sure the device is matched to patient need, consider if the following features may be helpful: • High contrast display that assist with visual impairments/low vision • Talking meter for visual impairments • Test strip and meter size and shape for individuals with dexterity impairments • Lancet function and needle removal for issues with manual dexterity • Alternate site monitoring possibilities • Portability of meter for monitoring multiple times a day • Affordability and access (insurance coverage/copays) • Ability to assist with insulin dosage calculations (bolus calculator) • Uploading capabilities • Interaction with a smart phone app Note: Diabetes Forecast magazine provides an annual review of current meters that can be helpful in guiding decision-making regarding meter selection. Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) provides feedback on the effectiveness of the treatment plan, assists with the eval Continue reading >>

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

Test strips are sold separately from glucose monitors and can be pricey.(KRISTEN AFONSO/PRISCILLA DE CASTRO)Blood glucose monitors are devicesabout the size of a cell phone or smallerthat are used to monitor your blood sugar at home. Although they can be mistaken for the latest fancy digital device, these gadgets come with lancets, which are used to poke the finger, and test strips, which is where you place the drop of blood before inserting it into the monitor to get a blood-sugar reading. They range in price from $20 to $70, but are often given away for free by various health-care providers. Companies can afford to give the monitors away for free because they make their money from the glucose strips, which can be pricey$1 or more per strip. If you check your blood sugar as often as you should, you can easily spend more than $100 a month. The vast majority of your cost will come from glucose strips. So when choosing your device, you should pay attention to the cost of the strips, even if the monitor is free. Glucose Meters"This may save your life" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You may need to select a specific blood glucose monitor because that's what your insurance plan covers. Edith Sciamanna, 79, of Binghamton, N.Y. has the Accu-Chek Advantage for just that reason. "I'm quite satisfied with it," she says. However, if you do have the luxury of choice, there are differences between models that can help you decide (in addition to the cost of the strips). Consider that some systems: Are multisite: This means you can prick yourself not only on the finger but also on the upper arm, forearm, thigh, calf, or fleshy part of the hand. Require smaller samples of blood: The lancet doesn't poke the skin as deeply. Give results in as little as five seconds: This fe Continue reading >>

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Goals For Blood Glucose Control

Discuss blood glucose (sugar) targets with your healthcare team when creating your diabetes management plan. People who have diabetes should be testing their blood glucose regularly at home. Regular blood glucose testing helps you determine how well your diabetes management program of meal planning, exercising and medication (if necessary) is doing to keep your blood glucose as close to normal as possible. The results of the nationwide Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) show that the closer you keep your blood glucose to normal, the more likely you are to prevent diabetes complications such as eye disease, nerve damage, and other problems. For some people, other medical conditions, age, or other issues may cause your physician to establish somewhat higher blood glucose targets for you. The following chart outlines the usual blood glucose ranges for a person who does and does not have diabetes. Use this as a guide to work with your physician and your healthcare team to determine what your target goals should be, and to develop a program of regular blood glucose monitoring to manage your condition. Time of Check Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people without diabetes Goal plasma blood glucose ranges for people with diabetes Before breakfast (fasting) < 100 70 - 130 Before lunch, supper and snack < 110 70 - 130 Two hours after meals < 140 < 180 Bedtime < 120 90- 150 A1C (also called glycosylated hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin A1c) < 6% < 7% < = less than > = greater than > = greater than or equal to < = less than or equal to Information obtained from Joslin Diabetes Center's Guidelines for Pharmacological Management of Type 2 Diabetes. Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

BLOOD SUGAR TESTING OVERVIEW If you have diabetes, you have an important role in your own medical care, and testing your blood glucose (also called blood sugar) is an opportunity for you to take control of your health. Although diabetes is a chronic condition, it can usually be controlled with lifestyle changes and medication. The main goal of treatment is to keep blood sugar levels in the normal or near-normal range. Checking your blood sugar is one of the best ways to know how well your diabetes treatment plan is working. Continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) have also become popular, especially for people who use an insulin pump. (See 'Continuous glucose monitoring' below.) A health care provider will periodically order a laboratory blood test to determine your blood sugar levels and glycated hemoglobin (A1C). This test gives an overall sense of how blood sugar levels are controlled since it indicates your average blood sugar level of the past two to three months (table 1). However, fine-tuning of blood sugar levels and treatment also requires that you monitor your own blood sugar levels on a day-to-day basis. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to know your blood glucose level at any time and helps prevent the consequences of very high or very low blood sugar. Monitoring also enables tighter blood sugar control, which decreases the long-term risks of diabetic complications. HOW TO PERFORM BLOOD SUGAR TESTING The following steps include general guidelines for testing blood sugar levels; you should get specific details for your blood glucose monitors from the package insert or your health care provider. Never share blood glucose monitoring equipment or fingerstick lancing devices. Sharing of this equipment could result in transmission of infection, such as hepatitis Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meter

Best Blood Glucose Meter

We spent over 50 hours researching and testing 16 different types of blood glucose meters and found that accuracy, ease of use, and cost were most important. The active1st Complete Diabetes Testing Kit scored high marks in all categories and is our top pick. We loved that everything we needed to monitor of blood glucose levels were included in this kit. It has test strips, lancets, solution, instructions, and a convenient case to name a few items. This all inclusive kit made blood glucose monitoring less complicated and having all the components in one case made it easy to keep up with when it came time to test. Navigation Introduction to the Blood Glucose Meter The blood glucose meters that are available are much smaller than they used to be and come with much more in the way of features. Accuracy is much better with these newer models as well. There are approximately 29 million Americans that have diabetes. One of the most important things that someone with diabetes can do is monitor their blood glucose. These glucose meters allow them to keep tabs on their levels so there are no complications. These top rated blood glucose meters are popular with consumers because of their quality of performance and reliability. Getting accurate test results means they can safely make any needed adjustments to their exercise and diet plans. Being able to do this lowers their risk of complications that can include kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage and even seizures. active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit You’ll have everything you need to test your blood glucose levels with the active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit. Bayer Contour is well known as the #1 rated test strip in the world and tops the charts in fast results and accuracy. Keep Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

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