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Recommended Blood Glucose Meters

Diabetes And Testing

Diabetes And Testing

Diabetes 101 THE MORE YOU KNOW Whether you’re newly diagnosed or you’ve been living with diabetes for years, you know there’s a lot to know. But when you take charge and take full advantage of all the latest tools, resources, and strategies to monitor your condition you’ll be better able to manage your diabetes on a daily basis and potentially live an active, healthy life. Checking your blood glucose levels at home can give you invaluable insights about how your treatment plan is working. When you know what’s making your blood glucose levels rise and fall you can take steps to help keep yourself on target based on your health care provider’s recommendations. Fortunately, there’s a wide range of blood glucose meters – also called blood glucose monitors – that enable you to easily and accurately check your blood glucose with just a tiny drop of blood. You’ve probably already talked with your health care provider about blood glucose testing but here’s a quick summary of what you’ll want to know about why, how and when to test. Why to test Self-monitoring helps you understand how you eat, portion sizes, weight loss, exercise, stress, illness, and medications affect your blood glucose levels. While seeing a health care provider for testing is very important, self-testing is likely going to be an essential part of staying on top of your treatment plan. Testing itself has no direct impact on your blood glucose but it enables you and your health care team to continually assess your condition and determine if changes are necessary. When you test regularly – and log faithfully – you’ll not only know if your blood glucose level is out of range on a particular day, you’ll see important trends that will help you and your healthcare practitioner set an Continue reading >>

Doing Keto? Consider Buying A Blood Glucose Meter

Doing Keto? Consider Buying A Blood Glucose Meter

The amount of glucose in your blood at any given time can give you valuable insights into how your body is reacting to the food you eat. If you’re doing a keto-based diet, the data you get from a glucose meter will help you optimize your eating for maximum weight loss! The premise of a keto-based diet is simple: Keep the carbs as low as possible so that your body is forced to get glucose (energy) from fat, rather than carbs. Any sort of glycemic reaction could cause a weight-loss stall for several days. Not sure what a Keto diet is, or want to learn more about it? I talk about what a keto diet is, and the pros and cons of this approach, in this blog article. What is a glycemic reaction? In short, a glycemic reaction is what happens when you eat carbs. It’s a fancy name for an even fancier process. Effectively, when you eat carbs, your body produces a hormone called “insulin” which is responsible for delivering the glucose (the energy from your the carbs you just ate) to the muscle cells in your body. In a keto-based diet, you want to avoid the production of insulin at all costs. Not because insulin itself is bad — but because it means you’ve short-circuited the keto process by eating too many carbs, and allowing your body to get energy from carbs, rather than fat. If this happens, it can take days to “reset” your body back into ketosis. In short, if you are doing a keto-based diet and your blood-glucose levels spike, you screwed up. How to measure your blood glucose level Get yourself a blood-glucose meter!! You can buy a blood-glucose meter from any pharmacy in the $20 to $40 range. The test-strips come in packs of 100 for around $25. (around $0.25 each if you’re bad at math). Here’s a link on Amazon to a glucose meter kit that’s perfectly adequat Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

World-wide annual sales of glucose meters and test-strip supplies tally up to well over 10 billion dollars each year, but with over 50 styles and brands to choose from, it can be hard to determine which meter is not only the best for your needs but also best in terms of accuracy, price, and ease of use. Thanks to Stacey Divone from The Girl with the Portable Pancreas, we got the inside scoop on the 2015 Consumer Reports review of today’s glucose meter technology. The first nine of these meters scored as “excellent” in accuracy and “above 80 out of 100” for their overall assessment. Here are the top 10 recommended meters: FreeStyle Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day FreeStyle Freedom Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day Bayer Contour Next: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $1460 at 4 strips per day Well at Walgreens True Metrix: $22 for the meter with an annual cost of $1225 at 4 strips per day Bayer Breeze 2: $25 for the meter with an annual cost of $1900 at 4 strips per day Up & Up Blood Glucose Meter from Target: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Aviva Plus: $30 for the meter with an annual cost of $2115 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Micro from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Compact Plus: $75 for the meter with an annual cost of $2030 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Ultima from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Do you use one of these top 10 meters? What are your favorite and least favorite features? Further reading on blood sugar monitoring: Continue reading >>

Use Of Blood Glucose Meters Among People With Type 2 Diabetes: Patient Perspectives

Use Of Blood Glucose Meters Among People With Type 2 Diabetes: Patient Perspectives

The clinical value of regular self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) in people with type 2 diabetes remains controversial. Some studies have found either no significant difference in A1C outcomes in groups performing or not performing SMBG1 or no evidence that SMBG confers benefits for outcomes other than A1C, such as mortality, long-term complications of diabetes, body weight, patient satisfaction, or quality of life.2 These studies2,3 have also indicated that there is “little indication that [patients are] using self-monitoring to effect and maintain behavior change.” One reason typically cited for the apparent lack of efficacy for SMBG in patients with type 2 diabetes is that patients simply do not adequately follow recommendations from their health care professionals.4 To date, few studies have explored the patients' perspective on SMBG beyond including standardized scales of “well-being” in more mechanized studies. In addition to formal recommendations from professional diabetes associations, leading diabetes clinicians and patient advocates with whom I am associated also disagree about the role of SMBG in the management of type 2 diabetes. My discussions with these individuals have provided further context for this topic. From them, I have heard: People with type 2 diabetes should not test very much at all because an A1C test performed every 3 months can provide sufficient information without the frustration of having to draw blood for daily tests that serve little purpose. Patients are just not getting the right education or motivation to be empowered to check their blood glucose levels and actually see the impact of their testing efforts. SMBG should be shifted from data collection to helping patients use the meter as a way to learn about their own body Continue reading >>

5 Must-follow Steps To Calibrate Your Blood Glucose Meter Correctly

5 Must-follow Steps To Calibrate Your Blood Glucose Meter Correctly

It is important for people to check their blood glucose level once in a while to see if they are diabetic or within the normal range. Especially for diabetic patients, it is extremely important for them to always monitor their blood sugar level. You may consider this a precautionary measure for yourself so that your blood sugar will not increase up to dangerous levels. Of course, in order for this to work, you have to ensure that your glucose meter is properly calibrated. Otherwise, what is the point of checking? You will not get the correct results anyway. So for diabetics out there who own one, here are the correct ways to calibrate it before you can start using it for your test. 5 Must-Follow Step To Calibrate Your Blood Glucose Meter Correctly Firstly, you have to check the code on the test strip vial. This can usually be found in bold print. Next, turn the meter on. Most units automatically do this once that you place the test strip inside. The test port can usually be found either on the top of the meter or at the bottom area. You can tell that the meter is not properly calibrated if the code that appears on the test strip vial does not match the one on the meter. If the meter is brand new and has never been used before, it is highly possible that it does not have a code at all. A flashing blank space will be displayed instead. The calibration process starts the moment when you set the code into the meter itself. How do you do that? It depends on the unit that you have. There are some meters that come with up and down arrows while some have only one button. Just continue pressing the button until you see the code that matches the vial. The last step is for you to test if it works by taking a blood sample. Once the test is complete and the display on the blood gluc Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Value Of Home Blood Sugar Monitoring Unclear

Type 2 Diabetes: Value Of Home Blood Sugar Monitoring Unclear

Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a central tenet of diabetes treatment: monitor the blood sugar closely, then adjust your diet, exercise, and medications to keep it in a good range. And that makes sense. Poorly controlled blood sugar is a major risk factor for diabetic complications, including kidney disease, vision loss, and nerve damage. While efforts to carefully monitor and control the blood sugar in diabetes are worthwhile, “tight control” is not always helpful — and it may even cause harm. For example, in studies of people with longstanding type 2 diabetes, the type that usually begins in adulthood and is highly linked with obesity, those with the tightest control either had no benefit or had higher rates of cardiovascular disease and death. Meanwhile, studies of people with type 1 diabetes — the type that tends to start during childhood due to an immune attack against the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas — suggest that tight control may help protect against cardiovascular disease. So, it seems the benefits and risks of tight control depend on the situation. Home blood sugar monitoring for type 2 diabetes People with diabetes are often advised to check their blood sugar levels at home by pricking a finger and testing the blood with a glucose meter. They can review the results with their doctors over the phone, online, or at the next office appointment. The value of this for people with type 2 diabetes is uncertain. In a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers enrolled 450 people with Type 2 diabetes, none of whom were taking insulin. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: no self-monitoring of blood sugar once daily self-monitoring of blood sugar once-daily self-monitoring of blood sugar with “enhanced feedba Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Self-blood glucose monitoring is a valuable diabetes management tool, which enables people to check their own blood glucose levels as often as they need to or as recommended. Where to get help See your doctor. Visit your nearest diabetes clinic. Ring healthdirect on 1800 022 222. Phone the Diabetes WA Advice Line on 1300 001 880. This information provided by This publication is provided for education and information purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical care. Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not imply endorsement and is not intended to replace advice from your healthcare professional. Readers should note that over time currency and completeness of the information may change. All users should seek advice from a qualified healthcare professional for a diagnosis and answers to their medical questions. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

The blood glucose meter has been around now for more than three decades, helping people with diabetes monitor blood sugar, also known as blood glucose. A glucose meter will help you to keep track of your glucose levels and help your doctor determine which types of medications would be the most beneficial for you in managing your diabetes. Glucose Meters: Who Benefits? Although all people with diabetes can benefit from using a glucose meter, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you regularly monitor blood sugar if: You take diabetes pills or insulin. You are on an intensive insulin program. You are pregnant. You have a difficult time controlling your blood sugar levels. You have experienced extreme low blood sugar levels or ketones from high blood sugar levels. You have a low blood glucose level, but don't have the typical symptoms. Glucose Meters: Available Types There are various types of blood glucose meters: Traditional meters give you a one-time snapshot of your blood glucose. Most people use a traditional glucose meter. These can include data management software that allows you to keep track of your blood glucose levels over time. The information can be charted and graphed and will help you and your physician to spot patterns, possibly making changes to your therapy or diet. But this added technology can also increase the price of a glucose meter. A well-kept log in a notebook can do the same job. Continuous glucose monitors provide readings every few minutes, 24 hours per day. This type of monitor does not involve pricking your finger, but instead uses a hair-thin probe inserted just under the skin in the upper arm area. Depending on the model, the probe works continuously for up to 5 to 7 days and is then changed. It reads the glucose level in the fl Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Blood glucose meters are small, computerized devices that measure and display your blood glucose level. These devices are mainly used by people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, monitoring your blood glucose level provides you and your doctors with valuable information about how food, exercise, medications, stress, and other factors affect your blood glucose. This information will help you and your doctor construct a treatment plan tailored to your needs. Many types of blood glucose meters are available for at-home use, from basic models that only read blood glucose levels, to more advanced versions that offer features such as memory for storing information. The cost of blood glucose meters and testing supplies varies, and insurance may not always provide coverage. Study all options before picking out a meter, and if you have insurance, check which meter your insurance covers. Consider up-front costs, such as how much the actual meter costs, and long-term costs, such as how expensive testing strips and other supplies are. Then, work with your doctor and learn how to properly use your meter. Whether this is your first blood glucose meter or you’ve used one for several years and are looking for an upgrade, there are several questions you should ask yourself before you begin looking: Does your doctor or nurse suggest a specific meter? These people have a wealth of experience with an array of meters and can guide you in a good direction. What does your insurance cover? Your insurance company may have a list of preapproved meters it covers. Also, make sure to find out if and how your insurance will cover the cost of testing strips and supplies. How much will this meter cost you? Some meters can be costly and insurance companies don’t always make allowances for pricier Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar (glucose) Monitors

Blood Sugar (glucose) Monitors

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers blood sugar monitors as durable medical equipment (DME) that your doctor prescribes for use in your home. Who's eligible? All people with Part B are covered. Your costs in Original Medicare If your supplier accepts assignment, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies. Medicare pays for different kinds of DME in different ways. Depending on the type of equipment: You may need to rent the equipment. You may need to buy the equipment. You may be able to choose whether to rent or buy the equipment. Medicare will only cover your DME if your doctors and DME suppliers are enrolled in Medicare. Doctors and suppliers have to meet strict standards to enroll and stay enrolled in Medicare. If your doctors or suppliers aren’t enrolled, Medicare won’t pay the claims submitted by them. It’s also important to ask your suppliers if they participate in Medicare before you get DME. If suppliers are participating suppliers, they must accept assignment. If suppliers are enrolled in Medicare but aren’t “participating,” they may choose not to accept assignment. If suppliers don't accept assignment, there’s no limit on the amount they can charge you. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

Introduction To Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

Introduction To Self-monitoring Blood Glucose

The tiny drop of blood you see on your test strip contains a wealth of information. You can use this to help you within the blood glucose target ranges recommended by your healthcare provider, as well as your own lifestyle goals.1 Blood sugar target ranges In general, the American Diabetes Association's (ADA) recommended blood sugar levels are: Between 80 and 130 mg/dL before meals2 Less than 180 mg/dL after meals2 Your range is yours alone—based on your health, age, level of activity and other factors. And remember that your target is a range you'd like to stay within, not a single number. But what if you're out of range? These results provide valuable information, too. You can review your numbers over time to find patterns in highs and lows. Then you can work with your healthcare team to make adjustments to your diabetes management plan that will bring you closer to your target range. Gaining insights from routine testing Day-to-day blood sugar checks—also known as routine testing—can give you a good idea of how you're doing at this moment, and they can be reviewed overall to see trends. They can help answer questions such as: Are your medications working as they should? How does the type or amount of food you eat affect your blood sugar? How does activity or stress affect your blood sugar? Your healthcare team will probably recommend a schedule of routine or daily testing to help you manage your blood sugar. Recognizing patterns with structured testing You can take self-monitoring a step further with structured testing—checking your blood sugar at specific times over a short period to see how the things you do may affect your blood sugar. For example, if you're interested in insights into your overall blood glucose control, you can identify patterns with the Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in diabetes management, a blood glucose test is typically performed by piercing the skin (typically, on the finger) to draw blood, then applying the blood to a chemically active disposable 'test-strip'. Different manufacturers use different technology, but most systems measure an electrical characteristic, and use this to determine the glucose level in the blood. The test is usually referred to as capillary blood glucose. Healthcare professionals advise patients with diabetes mellitus on the appropriate monitoring regimen for their condition. Most people with type 2 diabetes test at least once per day. The Mayo Clinic generally recommends that diabetics who use insulin (all type 1 diabetics and many type 2 diabetics) test their blood sugar more often (4-8 times per day for type 1 diabetics, 2 or more times per day for type 2 diabetics),[1] both to assess the effectiveness of their prior insulin dose and to help determine their next insulin dose. Purpose[edit] Blood glucose monitoring reveals individual patterns of blood glucose changes, and helps in the planning of meals, activities, and at what time of day to take medications.[2] Also, testing allows for quick response to high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This might include diet adjustments, exercise, and insulin (as instructed by the health care provider).[2] Blood glucose meters[edit] Main article: Glucose meter Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1991–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters are typically below 15 seconds). A blood glucose meter is an electronic device for measuring the blood Continue reading >>

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

What We Learned When We Tried (and Failed) To Find The Best Blood Glucose Meter

Chris Hannemann, a 32-year-old product engineer in San Diego, California, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 8. For the past 24 years, multiple times a day, every day, he’s pricked his finger and used a blood glucose meter to measure the amount of sugar in his blood and decide whether to administer either insulin or a snack.The meter Hannemann uses regularly sometimes gives him readings that suggest his blood sugar levels are normal, even when he feels woozy or loses fine motor control (early effects of low blood sugar levels). “As someone who’s been comatose multiple times [due to other diabetic issues],” he told us, “it’s not fun.” During a doctor’s visit, Hannemann noticed that his glucose levels in lab tests seemed different than the measurements he would take himself. He suspected that his blood glucose meter was giving him inaccurate readings. To prove his theory, he ran a series of tests on 10 different meters. Hannemann found that readings from different meters varied from each other by as much as 60 percent, even though they were analyzing the same drop of blood, and varied 30 percent on average from each other. He published his findings in a Medium post. This discovery frustrated him because there’s so little information on glucose meter accuracy. “As a patient, you have no knowledge of this,” he said. Now, if he is using the inaccurate meter, he mentally calculates the difference. “If I check my glucose and it reads 90, I have to remind myself, ‘Oh, you actually need to eat something before you go drive or run or something.’” Accuracy matters to people like Hannemann and the many patients like him. Twenty-one million Americans have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another eight million have diabetes but don’t know Continue reading >>

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