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Recipes Using Glucose Syrup

Simple Syrup | Recipe | Chefsteps

Simple Syrup | Recipe | Chefsteps

Simple syrup is simply sugar dissolved into water. The syrup provides an easy way to add dissolved sugar to any recipe. At room temperature (68 F / 20 F), you can dissolve about 67 g of sucrose into 33 g of water to make 100 g of simple syrup. Chefs and bartenders often refer to this as a two-to-one simple syrup. A less-concentrated simple syrup, using a one-to-one ratio, is also common. If you want to prepare a more concentrated syrup, then you must increase the temperature of the water to increase its ability to dissolve sugar. In fact, it's always easier to dissolve the sugar into hot water and then cool the syrup, as we do in this recipe. The not-so-simple thing is to make sure the syrup doesn't become grainy. This can happen in several ways. You cool the syrup too far. The solubility of sugar decreases with temperature, and so the excess sugar crystallizes. You leave the simple syrup uncovered. Water evaporates and the solution eventually becomes concentrated beyond the point of saturation. Sugar crystals start to form at the surface, where evaporation is happening more quickly. You stir a simple syrup that's close to its saturation point. Sometimes that's enough to cause fine crystals to suddenly form. The solution? Raising the temperature of the syrup, adding a bit more water, or doing both are the easiest ways to re-dissolve these crystals. Or, you can add glucose -- a sugar that doesn't readily form crystals. Corn syrup is another ingredient that slows the nucleation and growth of sugar crystals. By adding just a little bit to a nearly saturated simple syrup, the solution is less likely to become grainy over time. This is why pastry chefs often add glucose to recipes that contain a lot of sugar, like caramel, meringues, and sorbets. These recipes all contain s Continue reading >>

Rolled Fondant Recipe - Allrecipes.com

Rolled Fondant Recipe - Allrecipes.com

The reviewer that stated the powdered sugar wasn't sufficient was because they substituted EQUAL amounts of corn syrup for glucose which is incorrect. Corn syrup contains a higher % of water th... I think i did well on this recipe as a first timer. But I really got tired of kneading it manually, i transfered it to a bread kneader...a stand mixer using the dough hook attachment and it came... I used this recipe to make a stacked 3 tier wedding cake. It was easy to make and was tastier than other rolled fondants I have tasted - especially the boxed stuff. I substitued the glucose fo... I have been making 3D cakes for a couple of years now and have wanted to use a "wrap" frosting, but have been deterred by fears of ease of prep and taste ("Chalk" is the term I heard most). Thi... My first time using fondant and it didn't turn out too bad. I used corn syrup in place of glucose and it turned out fine, first batch I ended up using more powdered sugar. Second batch I used a ... Loved it! Taste great. The only thing is it HAD to be a 100+ degree day here so I had a heck of a time with it. I added a ton of extra sugar and it was still sticky (thanks to the humidity). ... Easy to make but needed much more powdered sugar. It was beautiful on the cake too. I used corn syrup instead of the glucose which is a nice substitution. Any flavoring can be added too. What a... I really, really like this recipe. My children helped and simple didn't won't to stop working with it. My daughter said, "This is clay I would like to play with and eat." We flavored it with ... I'm not an expert, but this was a Fiasco!!! I followed the instructions step by step. The texture was good, so was the taste, but when I tried to roll it, it was imposible. It kept sticking to... Continue reading >>

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

Baking - How Do I Make Liquid Glucose From Powdered Glucose - Seasoned Advice

How do I make liquid glucose from powdered glucose I recently decided to make something that required liquid glucose, 140g of it. No problem in general, but for some reason none of my usual suppliers had stock (even tried pharmacies). The closest I found was glucose powder. Unfortunately, having no clue how to "re-hydrate" the powder to a liquid form, I experimented. :-) I can safely say that 100g glucose powder was way to much as a substitute for 140g of liquid glucose (which I expected). However, I was wondering if any of you had a convenient method of turning powdered glucose into the wonderfully thick and sticky liquid glucose, in case I ever find myself in that position. Chemically speaking, saying "liquid glucose" is inaccurate. To explain, at normal temperatures, glucose is a solid; depending on the isomer/chiral form , melts at ~150C, and is a liquid above that temperature when not under pressure. ...What you want is a solution (syrup) with water. Glucose also dissolves in nonpolar solvents for other 'liquid' solutions. zanlok Nov 30 '12 at 18:50 Well, the answer is "it depends." This is pretty much the same as asking, "I have sugar, and I want sugar syrup. How much water do I add?" It depends on the concentration you're looking for. If you're looking for a 24% solution, it's 24 grams of glucose in 76 grams of water. A 30% solution is 30 grams of glucose in 70 grams of water, etc, etc. Unless you have some chemical reason to avoid dextrin, you can just substitute corn syrup. The only reason they use glucose in Europe is because they don't have our superabundance of corn. I live in South Africa, and unfortunately corn syrup is not generally available. We base most of our syrups and sugars off sugar cane. brianb Aug 25 '11 at 17:11 Sorry, forgot to ask. What is c Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose In A Cake

Liquid Glucose In A Cake

Asked by saramalouisduke. Answered on 5th February 2012 When making a Chocolate Fruit Cake, at what stage should I add liquid glucose and how should I add it? Liquid glucose, often referred to as glucose syrup, is a liquid form of simple sugar. It tends to keep products soft and moist so is often used in icings (such as royal icing) to stop them from becoming hard and sometimes in baking to keep products soft and moist. In most domestic baking it would be more common to use invert sugars such as golden syrup, corn syrup or clear/runny honey to add moisture to baked goods (invert sugars usually contain glucose and also fructose). These products are easier to find and are usually sold in larger quantities than liquid glucose. Liquid glucose used to be sold only in pharmacies but now it is often sold by cake decorating specialists or in the baking section in supermarkets. As the liquid glucose is a sugar it would normally be added to the cake whenever any other sugar is added. For a classic cake recipe it would be at the beginning, when butter and sugar are creamed together. If the cake is made by melting ingredients together then the glucose would be added to the melting mixture. We would suggest that you try Nigella's Incredibly Easy Chocolate Fruit Cake from Christmas (p180). This contains honey instead of liquid glucose and is very easy to make. Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 Ways To Use Up Your Jar Of Queen Glucose Syrup

10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup If you have a humble jar of Queen Glucose stashed away at the back of the pantry, this blog is for you! Read on to discover new recipes to make using glucose and why its such a handy baking ingredient. Glucose syrup is typically used in foods to enhance flavour, soften, add volume and prevent crystallisation. There is a tonne of incredible ways to use up that jar of goodness, so weve rounded up 10 amazing ideas to use up that jar of Queen Glucose Syrup , that hopefully become new favourites in your baking repertoire. Home > Blog > Inspiration Alert > 10 ways to use up your jar of Queen Glucose Syrup Marshmallows, what can we say? Pillowy soft, fluffy and irresistible. You may end up using your jar making batch after batch of these Vanilla and Maple Marshmallows. If youve never made your own marshmallows, youre in for a treat. Glucose is the ultimate texture enhancer, not only does it stop crystallisation, it creates a creamier marshmallow and helps keep them soft and squishy for days. If they last that long Glucose is the perfect substitute for corn syrup. Traditionally, Pecan Pie is made with half corn syrup, half sugar to create a smooth textured pie without being overly sweet. This means that delicious pecan flavour shines through without too much caramelisation. Glucose is one of the best binders for Chewy Granola Bars. Its perfect for holding all your ingredients together without the sweetness that honey, sugar or other syrups give. Because Glucose is only 74% sweetness of sugar its perfect for those who prefer their granola bars on the lower end of the sweetness scale. To put it simply, the molecules in glucose stop the other sugars from crystallising, which creates that gritty, icy texture you sometimes find in y Continue reading >>

Substitutions - Can I Substitute Glucose Syrup For Sugar In Cake Recipes? - Seasoned Advice

Substitutions - Can I Substitute Glucose Syrup For Sugar In Cake Recipes? - Seasoned Advice

Can I substitute Glucose Syrup for Sugar in cake recipes? I need to bake a cake without fructose, so all forms of granulated sugar and most syrups (including honey, agave & maple syrup) are out. I've heard of granulated dextrose but can't find it. I'd like to use Glucose Syrup instead of sugar but need to know how to alter the recipe to compensate for using a syrup instead of granulated sugar. Dextrose in powder form is very easy to get a hold of! As mentioned before, it is a very common ingredient in brewing, and is readily available from homebrew stores. While not as cheap as traditional table sugar, it isn't expensive either. Search online to see if there are any homebrew stores local to you. Dextrose (which is identical to glucose for cooking purposes) has relative sweetness of 50% to 75% of sucrose (i.e. normal sugar). Source: chestofbooks.com/food/science/Experimental-Cookery/ Evgeni Sergeev Oct 14 '13 at 0:38 You can get pure powdered glucose aka dextrose: look in the home-brewing supplies of your local supermarket or department store. I don't home-brew myself, but I'm told that one of the steps involved requires dextrose. Fructose doesn't work right, for some reason. "Corn syrup" (not HFCS) is supposed to be a primarily glucose syrup, though some formulations contain dextrose. It should not have any fructose in it, though I don't know if any of the brands guarantee that. Karo syrup contained HFCS up until a year ago or so, but it's since been removed. Your best bet would be to contact the manufacturer(s) and ask. You would A) need to use more syrup than the recipe calls for sugar as it's not as sweet and B) reduce the amount of liquid from other sources (milk, oil etc). It will probably vary from recipe to recipe - a bit of experimentation is needed I would thi Continue reading >>

When To Use, And Not Use, Corn Syrup In A Recipe

When To Use, And Not Use, Corn Syrup In A Recipe

A subject, and and ingredient, comes up frequently when talking about baking and candy making. And thats about usingcorn syrup in recipes. I use it judiciously when it will make a discernible difference in a recipe. For those of you who are regular readers of the site and my books, youll notice almost all of the time, I rarelyuse pre-packaged or convenience foods in my baking. So when I do call for something, like corn syrup, itll often be in amounts of one teaspoon or a tablespoon. And since most recipes feed eight-to-twelve people, proportionally, thats a pretty small amount. For example, the recipe for Peanut Butter Cookies with Salted Butter Caramel has one tablespoon of corn syrup added to the caramel, to keep it smooth. Since the recipe makes fifty cookies, that means each cookie contains less than 1/16th of a teaspoon of corn syrup. Yes, people who live in America probably do eat too much corn syrup. (High fructose, or otherwise.) That can be controlled and monitored by using less-packaged foods and reducing the amounts of fast foods that you consume. If youre worried about corn syrup hiding in foods, read labels, cook for yourself as much as possible, and buy locally-produced products from smaller producers who are less-likely to put additives in foods, so youll be in control of how much youre eating. I am a fan of natural and alternative liquid sweeteners, such as agave nectar, maple syrup, honey, rice syrup, and golden syrup, and do have recipes that use them, and encourage folks to give them a try, where applicable. There are a lot of studies, medical reports, advertising, propaganda, and all sorts of information being disseminated from a variety of sources. Evidence does point to high-fructose corn syrup contributing more than other sweeteners, to obesity a Continue reading >>

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose - The Answer To Perfect Ice-cream And More | Azelia's Kitchen

Liquid Glucose The Answer to Perfect Ice-Cream and More I think it was reading about Heston Blumenthal opening up a restaurant in London where his famous liquid nitrogen ice-cream will be served that jolted this quest of mine; how to make ice-cream at home that stays soft. After reading Kavey spost about an ice-cream shop in Camden Town, London, serving liquid nitrogen ice-cream, it seems theres a desire for supersoft textured ice-cream. Yes, liquid nitrogen makes super-duper soft ice-cream but whats the answer for the home cook? What about the rest of us? Go and purchase yourself a little bottle of liquid glucose, its adult and child-safeurmunless small child gets their little fingers into the sticky icky jar and runs fingers on your furniture! This post on liquid glucose is a follow up from Ice-Cream or Sorbet Too Firm in the Freezer? post where I searched into the problem of home ice-cream freezing too solid in the freezer and discovering the answer was liquid glucose, but I wanted to know more about the effect this inverted sugar has in ice-cream, why it helps to maintain it soft. Its sugar that has been boiled down with some water and a little acid until its thick and syrup like, it can take as little as 15 mins, at that point it becomes inverted sugar. What makes inverted sugar special is that once it gets to the broken-molecule down stage it cant go back to its former self, its molecules have been broken down to the extent they cant re-form and crystallise, it stays runny, thick and in syrup state. Think of any syrup like golden syrup by Tate & Lyle, molasses or corn syrup and thats what they are. It can be made from cane as golden syrup is, or potato, rice or wheat starch. In the US cornstarch seems the most popular choice. The other interesting thing about inv Continue reading >>

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

Using Dextrose (glucose) In Cooking And Baking

What is dextrose? Is it the same as glucose? What is it used for in baking? How is it different from regular sugar? How do I substitute dextrose for sugar in a recipe? Is glucose syrup the same as corn syrup? Where do I buy glucose / dextrose? This is your ultimate post on glucose / dextrose, read on to find out the answers to your questions What is dextrose (glucose)? Dextrose is a form of glucose. Dextrose = D-glucose, hence, the terms dextrose and glucose are used interchangeably. It’s also sometimes called corn sugar, grape sugar, crystaline glucose, wheat sugar, rice sugar or rice syrup. The full name is dextrose monohydrate and it is a simple sugar generated from the hydrolysis of starch, most commonly corn. The corn starch is treated with naturally occurring enzymes (they same as in our mouths) or acid. There is no way around the fact that this is a processed product, but at least it simulates natural occurrences (when we eat starch, it’s hydrolyzed by enzymes and broken down further by stomach acids to for example dextrose). Wait, hang on – I thought this was a sugar-free blog? I’m glad you asked. There are so many people, blogs, sites and books out there now with a “sugar-free” label. Despite that label, you may often find the following sugars in the recipes: Agave nectar, honey, brown rice syrup, glucose syrup, dextrose powder. Read about agave nectar here (to be honest, I fail to see this product as being healthy for anyone) and read about honey here (depends if you are overweight, diabetic or neither, but generally avoid it). When it comes to brown rice syrup (also known as rice malt syrup or rice syrup), glucose syrup (also know as liquid glucose) and dextrose powder, these are all broken down to 100% glucose in our bodies. Glucose can processed Continue reading >>

How Do I Use Glucose Syrup/liquid Glucose When Baking Cakes, Specifically Victoria Sponge, Choc Fudge And Carrot Cake?

How Do I Use Glucose Syrup/liquid Glucose When Baking Cakes, Specifically Victoria Sponge, Choc Fudge And Carrot Cake?

Hi HalfPint, thank you for your reply, It was for a Chocolate Fudge Cake, ingredients are: sugar, wheat flour, vegetable oil, margarine, cocoa powder, glucose syrup, egg, salt, whey solids (not sure what this is either!?) and sweetened condensed milk. There are no quantities but I think she makes a 12" cake in 2 layers. I'm just guessing here: I think the glucose is to make the texture of the cake fudgey. I don't think you can omit it without affecting the texture of the finished product. Might be able to substitute with corn syrup, I think you use less of it (I'm just not sure how much). Whey solids are milk protein. Used in baking for clean taste, added texture, increased protein and longer shelf life ( ) Hi PieceofLayerCake, Thank you for your advice, very interesting. I feel I am getting caught up in thinking about emulating my customers previous supplier which is silly. I need to keep telling myself my business is Homemade cakes, emphasis on HOMEMADE. I think I need to reinforce that with my customer, tell them they may need to adjust their prices slightly because they are going from a large established family company (30 years old) to me in my kitchen just starting out. I don't want to start messing around with preservatives/additives for shelf-life, it's not what I am about. PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking. Something I've learned over the years is to communicate your principles and your mission with you customers and STICK to them. If people know what to expect, they won't be disappointed when you deliver on that expectation. But, if you're wishy washy or vague....they will take advantage of that...to your disadvantage. Things like policies, recipes, flavors (I don't use raisins, I just don't), aesthetics, time limits (cake orders are to be 48 hou Continue reading >>

Glucose Syrup Instead Of Corn Syrup?

Glucose Syrup Instead Of Corn Syrup?

I want to make the Peanut Brittle recipe in the christmas thread, but can't find corn syrup.Does anyone know if I can use Glucose Syrup?It says on the bottle it is made from corn... I think this has been asked before... I'll just do a Search: According to this previous thread, try looking for Karo brand corn syrup in the health food section of a supermarket, or the health food shop... or otherwise, you can use glucose syrup. Can / should i replace corn syrup with glucose? i have a recipe that calls for corn syrup. i couldnt find it any where! so i am thinking maybe i could replace it with glucose, as i have it my cupboard allready. You can interchange glucose and corn syrup in most recipes. There's a small difference in viscosity for which you may need to make adjustments. Glucose is an invert sugar and does not crystallize when cooked. That's why it is used for nougat candies. Though not an invert sugar, corn syrup doesn't crystallize when cooked. Maple syrup cannot be substituted for corn syrup because it crystallizes when cooked, as does table sugar, cane syrup, molasses and honey. Continue reading >>

Sugar Free Recipes For Cakes, Cookies, Ice Cream And Muffins

Sugar Free Recipes For Cakes, Cookies, Ice Cream And Muffins

I may receive a commission from some links in this post. These easy sugar free recipes will delight the senses with rich flavours and textures.... without the sugar. There is no need to go without cake for the rest of your life, just because you want to reduce your - or your family's - sugar intake. I have worked hard to produce sugarfree recipes that taste wonderful, have soulful texture and satisfy your desire for good things without the sugar overload. These sugar free recipes have no table sugar, caster sugar, brown sugar, corn syrup or golden syrup in them.In short, no sucrose. There are many alternate sweeteners out there. Some are just sugar by another name: honey, maple syrup, agave syrup, high fructose corn syrup. Some are less processed but are they better for you?? We also have many artificial sweeteners to choose from. I'm sure you too have found that many of them have an awful after-taste! The newer stevia based products are improving on this but my favourite sweetener remains Dextrose . Dextrose monohydrate is a powdered form of glucose that is readily digestible and is not as addictive as sucrose or High Fructose Corn Syrup. Dextrose is a powdered form of Glucose. It is the good digestible half of sugar without the nasty Fructose. The chemical composition (for those who care) is one molecule of Glucose bonded to a water molecule. Most recipes can substitute Dextrose for sugar. When cooking with this new ingredient, you will find that it absorbs more of the wet ingredients than sugar, so the trick lies in adjusting the "normal" quantities of dry and wet ingredients to get the balance right. Luckily I have done a lot of the experimentation for you! Dextrose tastes about 80% as sweet as table sugar. The sugar free recipes for cookies , biscuits , cakes , mu Continue reading >>

Homemade Clear White Syrup

Homemade Clear White Syrup

A selection of recipes. - Max M Rasmussen Video recipe - You often need a syrup as a base ingredient in other recipes. The is a short presentation about how to make your own syrup. I present one basic recipe and show 4 variations that you can use as an ingredient in other recipes. usage: often used as basic syrup in sorbet ice and syrup in canned fruit fruit. usage: often used as syrup in canned fruit. usage: Italian meringue, cream puffs, marzipan. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. cup (100 grams) grape sugar or glucose. Bring water and sugar to a boil. Let it cook until there are no visible sugar crystals left. But be aware that the longer you cook it, the more water will evaporate. So you may risk that a 1:3 syrup becomes a 1:4 instead. 1:1 (1 part sugar to 1 part water) and 1:2 syrup can usually be stored for long periods at room temperature without any problems. When you make 1:3 and 1:4 syrup then it will crystallizes if you just let it stand. You can reheat it and melt the sugar, but that is a hassle. In order to avoid crystallization you mix two different kinds of sugar together in your syrup. Sugar molecules are a bit like Lego bricks. If they are all the same they will easily glue together and form crystals. If they are different they will not. So mixing different types of bricks / molecules prevents that they grow together and crystalize. There must be added more than 20% "foreign" sugar for it to work. You can use both glucose, dextrose or most other sugars. Whatever you can most easily get a hold of. It does not make much difference in the amounts if you are using a syrup or a powder as the foreign sugar. You can add flavor to your syrup as you like. The seeds from a vanilla pod is a good and classical flavour. Citrus zest. A stick of cinnamon. A sta Continue reading >>

Marshmallows - Kidspot

Marshmallows - Kidspot

It's easy to forget that marshmallows can be easily made at home. Using gelatine and glucose syrup, this marshmallow recipe is guaranteed to work the first time. Do they taste as good as the shop-bought variety? Yes! 3 tbsp gelatine (or 3 sachets) and cup water 2/3 cup corn syrup, (or glucose syrup plus 50 ml water) In a double boiler, combine caster sugar, half cup water and corn syrup. Whilst this is boiling away, combine the corn flour and icing sugar together. Spray a tin or lamington tray with non-stick spray and sift one-third of the dusting mixture of the combined icing sugar mix over the tin. Boil the mixture until it reaches 120C. If you don't have a thermometer, boil until the mixture goes completely clear. When the mixture is clear, start the mixer and gradually add the gelatine mixture and then the sugar mix. Mix on high for about 7-10 minutes until mixture becomes thick and meringue-like. Add vanilla, salt and colour and beat for a further minute until totally combined. Pour into tray and leave to set for about 15 minutes (it doesn't need to go in the fridge!). Sift a further one-third of the dusting mixture across the top and then turn out the marshmallow slab onto the bench. Cut up or cut out with cookie cutters if you wish - dust with the remaining one-third of the sugar/cornflour mix. If you can't buy corn syrup then the you can use the glucose syrup in it's place. You will need to add the 50 mls of water if using the glucose because glucose is very thick. Variations: Instead of vanilla, add mint essence and dip marshmallows in dark chocolate. I made this last night after a failed attempt at another recipe which used eggs earlier in the week. This recipe was created by Melissa Klemke for Kidspot, Australias best recipe finder. Use 3 tbs gelatine or 3 s Continue reading >>

Caramel Sauce Recipe | Good. Food. Stories.

Caramel Sauce Recipe | Good. Food. Stories.

Please dont call me a stupid girl, but science was never my favorite subject in high school. Despite childhood obsessions with dinosaurs , the NASA space program , and the process of mummification (yes, they did remove the brains through the nose with knitting-needle-style hooks), my interest in becoming a real archaeologist or physicist faded once I had to memorize more than the behavior of protons, neutrons, and electrons. So imagine my surprise when I discovered that making caramel, a highly scientific process, is one of my favorite kitchen party tricks. Caramel is basically two ingredients: sugar mixed with cream. Sounds so simple, right? But theres a clever chemistry that makes the business a bit trickier than youd think, and heres why. Though it looks dry to the naked eye, granulated table sugar is actually classified as a wet ingredient its a molecule called sucrose (formed of equal parts glucose and fructose, just like those tricky protons and neutrons!) that dissolves fully in water. Problem is, this particular molecule has a danger zone. As the sucrose heats up and prepares to break down into glucose and fructose (aka become a sweet, glorious syrup), it has a tendency to re-crystallize into really hard chunks. If this happens, game over: those glucose and fructose bits are bonded like superglue and youll never get them to unbind. Youll sometimes hear people talking about the caramel seizing upthis is what theyre talking about. So while you could make caramel sauce by simply melting sugar on its own in a pan or throwing in a tablespoon or two of water to help the process of dissolution into syrup, I use the extra insurance policy known as light corn syrup to help mitigate potential crystallization. Note that light corn syrup is not the same thing as the dreade Continue reading >>

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