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Random Blood Sugar

A Random Blood Sugar Diabetes Detection Survey.

A Random Blood Sugar Diabetes Detection Survey.

Abstract In a co-operative study undertaken between various groups in the community, 3212 persons were screened at the Agricultural and Pastoral Summer Show in Christchurch. The mean glucose value was 88.4 mg/dl (4.9mmol/l) which roughly equates to 91 mg/dl (5.1mmol/l) plasma value. There was a standard deviation of 19.5mg/dl (1.08mmol/l) the 22.5 percentile was 63mg (3.5mmol/l), the 97.5 percentile was 125 (6.5mmol/l). One hundred and twenty persons of the total of 3212 were advised to contact their family doctors as a result of higher than normal blood sugar levels on the day. Twenty-five probable diabetics were diagnosed. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

Definition A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. Alternative Names Random blood sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How to Prepare for the Test The test may be done in the following ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 hours (fasting) At any time of the day (random) Two hours after you drink a certain amount of glucose (oral glucose tolerance test) How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of diabetes. More than likely, the doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test. The blood glucose test is also used to monitor people who already have diabetes. The test may also be done if you have: An increase in how often you need to urinate Recently gained a lot of weight Blurred vision Confusion or a change in the way you normally talk or behave Fainting spells Seizures (for the first time) SCREENING FOR DIABETES This test may also be used to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. A fasting blood sugar test is almost always done to screen for diabetes. If you Continue reading >>

Does A Random Blood Sugar Level Of 140-150 Mg/dl Indicate A Pre-diabetic Stage?

Does A Random Blood Sugar Level Of 140-150 Mg/dl Indicate A Pre-diabetic Stage?

Answered by: Dr Smita Gupta | Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Southern Illinois University, USA Q: I am 30 years old female. My blood sugar is always around 140-150 mg/dl whenever checked randomly. I otherwise feel normal and am healthy. But I want to know whether this is a pre diabetic stage? How can I prevent diabetes? A:A random blood sugar of 140-150 mg/dl per se is not considered diabetes or pre-diabetes. Normal fasting blood glucose is 100 mg/dl or less and 2 hours after meals is <140 mg/dl. Pre-diabetes is considered when fasting blood glucose 100-126 mg/dl or 2 hr after meal blood glucose is 140-199 mg/dl. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels In Toddlers

Blood Sugar Levels In Toddlers

Most toddlers are pint-sized bundles of energy that never seem to stop moving. You are used to your child's extreme moods: the highs that occur after a period of excitement like a birthday party, and the cranky low times when your toddler needs a snack or a nap. Many of these whims and moods can be associated with your tot's blood sugar levels. Children of all ages can experience periods of high and low blood sugar levels. Some of the fluctuations are normal; others might indicate diabetes. Video of the Day Your toddler's blood sugar levels are measured through a blood test. Tests may be random, taken at a routine well-child checkup or at another time if your pediatrician is concerned about the possibility of diabetes. Random blood tests do not require your toddler to fast; normal results are those that read under 200 mg/dL. A fasting glucose test requires you to take your toddler for a blood draw after an overnight fast, before he has eaten breakfast in the morning. Normal blood sugar levels for a fasting test range between 100 and 125 mg/dL. Readings higher than 125 may indicate that your child has diabetes. Feeding your toddler healthy meals and snacks on a regular schedule can help regulate the blood sugar fluctuations that, while normal to a degree, can rev your child up or lead to a "crash and burn" situation. Foods high in sugar can give your toddler a boost of energy, along with a spike in glucose levels. The energetic phase ends sometimes abruptly and from the parent's point of view, somewhat catastrophically when your child is exhausted, hungry and irritable. Incorporating whole grains and fiber into your toddler's diet can help keep blood sugar levels more even after eating. Fruits, vegetables, whole grain pastas, rices and breads and lean proteins can help a Continue reading >>

Glucose Test

Glucose Test

Definition A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. Alternative Names Random blood sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How to Prepare for the Test The test may be done in the following ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 hours (fasting) At any time of the day (random) Two hours after you drink a certain amount of glucose (oral glucose tolerance test) How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of diabetes. More than likely, the doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test. The blood glucose test is also used to monitor people who already have diabetes. The test may also be done if you have: An increase in how often you need to urinate Blurred vision Confusion or a change in the way you normally talk or behave Fainting spells Seizures (for the first time) SCREENING FOR DIABETES This test may also be used to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. A fasting blood sugar test is almost always done to screen for diabetes. If you are over age 45, you should be t Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose

Blood Glucose

Test Overview A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Glucose comes from carbohydrate foods . It is the main source of energy used by the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body's cells use the glucose. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood when the amount of glucose in the blood rises. Normally, your blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat. This increase causes your pancreas to release insulin so that your blood glucose levels do not get too high. Blood glucose levels that remain high over time can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. There are several different types of blood glucose tests. Fasting blood sugar (FBS). This test measures blood glucose after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. It is often the first test done to check for prediabetes and diabetes . 2-hour postprandial blood sugar. This test measures blood glucose exactly 2 hours after you start eating a meal. This is not a test used to diagnose diabetes. This test is used to see if someone with diabetes is taking the right amount of insulin with meals. Random blood sugar (RBS). It measures blood glucose regardless of when you last ate. Several random measurements may be taken throughout the day. Random testing is useful because glucose levels in healthy people do not vary widely throughout the day. Blood glucose levels that vary widely may mean a problem. This test is also called a casual blood glucose test. Oral glucose tolerance test. This test is used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test is a series of blood glucose measurements taken after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose. This test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes that occurs durin Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Blood sugar (glucose) measurements are used to diagnose diabetes. They are also used to monitor glucose control for those people who are already known to have diabetes. Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If your glucose level remains high then you have diabetes. If the level goes too low then it is called hypoglycaemia. The main tests for measuring the amount of glucose in the blood are: Random blood glucose level. Fasting blood glucose level. The HbA1c blood test. Oral glucose tolerance test. Capillary blood glucose (home monitoring). Urine test for blood sugar (glucose). Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A: Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much sl Continue reading >>

Dealing With Unexplained Blood Sugar Spikes

Dealing With Unexplained Blood Sugar Spikes

You can do everything right to keep your diabetes under control — eat a smart diet, exercise, take medications as prescribed, and follow your doctor’s instructions for blood sugar monitoring — and still wake up in the morning with unexplained blood sugar spikes. Even in people who don’t have diabetes, blood sugars fluctuate constantly, says Linda M. Siminerio, RD, PhD, director of the University of Pittsburgh's Diabetes Institute. But when you have diabetes and wake up with an increase in blood sugar levels, you shouldn’t ignore it. If high blood sugar happens once in a while and you're able to get it under control quickly with insulin or exercise, it may be nothing serious. “Maybe you have high blood sugar in the morning because you went to a party last night and had a bigger piece of birthday cake,” Dr. Siminerio says. “Or it snowed, and you couldn’t go for your morning run the day before.” But if you consistently wake up with blood sugar spikes and don’t know why, you need to investigate the cause. You may need to adjust your diabetes treatment plan, possibly changing your medication. You won’t feel right if you have high blood sugar, a condition known as hyperglycemia, says Anuj Bhargava, MD, president of the Iowa Diabetes and Endocrinology Research Center in Des Moines and founder of My Diabetes Home, an online platform that helps users track their blood sugar and manage their medication. When your blood sugar is too high for a few days or weeks, it can cause more frequent urination, increased thirst, weight loss, blurry vision, fatigue, and nausea. It also can make you more susceptible to infections. When you have high blood sugar for a long time, it can damage the vessels that supply blood to your heart, kidneys, nerves, and eyes, and caus Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose

Blood Glucose

Test Overview A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Glucose comes from carbohydrate foods. It is the main source of energy used by the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body's cells use the glucose. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood when the amount of glucose in the blood rises. Normally, your blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat. This increase causes your pancreas to release insulin so that your blood glucose levels do not get too high. Blood glucose levels that remain high over time can damage your eyes, kidneys, nerves, and blood vessels. There are several different types of blood glucose tests. Fasting blood sugar (FBS). This test measures blood glucose after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. It is often the first test done to check for prediabetes and diabetes. 2-hour postprandial blood sugar. This test measures blood glucose exactly 2 hours after you start eating a meal. This is not a test used to diagnose diabetes. This test is used to see if someone with diabetes is taking the right amount of insulin with meals. Random blood sugar (RBS). It measures blood glucose regardless of when you last ate. Several random measurements may be taken throughout the day. Random testing is useful because glucose levels in healthy people do not vary widely throughout the day. Blood glucose levels that vary widely may mean a problem. This test is also called a casual blood glucose test. Oral glucose tolerance test. This test is used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. An oral glucose tolerance test is a series of blood glucose measurements taken after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose. This test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes that occurs during Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

All-cause Mortality Of High-normal Random Blood Glucose Using Basic Demographics

All-cause Mortality Of High-normal Random Blood Glucose Using Basic Demographics

1NYU Lutheran Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA 2Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine at USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA 4Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK 5Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAE 6Tawam Hospital, Al Ain, UAE 7epartment of Infection and Immunity, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 8Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA 9Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA Citation: Saith SE, Tang J, Irving G, Memari SAA, Dhaheri ADA, et al. (2016) All-cause Mortality of High-normal Random Blood Glucose using Basic Demographics. J Cardiovasc Dis Diagn 4:248. doi:10.4172/2329-9517.1000248 Copyright: © 2016 Saith SE, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Cardiovascular Diseases & Diagnosis Abstract Abstract Background: The prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions both in the United States and worldwide. A recent World Health Organization (WHO) report has estimated the prevalence has quadrupled in just three decades and is directly responsible for the deaths of 1.5 million people worldwide. More than 80% of these deaths occur in low and middle income countries. The forecasted urban population in developing nations is expected to double by the year 2030, compared to the year 2000. Methods: We utilized a Continue reading >>

Blood Tests For Diabetes: Random Plasma Glucose Test

Blood Tests For Diabetes: Random Plasma Glucose Test

Also known as: RPG; casual plasma glucose test; random blood sugar test. What is it? The random plasma glucose test measures plasma (or blood) glucose levels. It is performed with a small blood draw taken at any time of the day (hence the term “random”). Why is this test performed? Generally, as a screening test for diabetes when a patient has serious diabetes symptoms and has had food or drink, and therefore can’t do a fasting plasma glucose test or oral glucose tolerance test. How is this test performed? The test consists of a simple blood draw, which is sent to your doctor’s lab for analysis. What do normal results mean? A random plasma glucose test that is under 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) is considered acceptable. What do abnormal results mean? Levels of 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) or higher, along with the presence of symptoms of diabetes (e.g., excessive thirst and/or urination, blurry vision, unexplained weight loss), indicate a diagnosis of diabetes. The results should be confirmed through a separate test, either the oral glucose tolerance test or the fasting plasma glucose test, taken on another day. Other conditions which may result in an elevated result include pancreatitis, Cushing’s syndrome, liver or kidney disease, eclampsia, and other acute illnesses, such as sepsis and myocardial infarction (heart attack). SOURCES American Diabetes Association. “Diagnosing Diabetes and Learning About Prediabetes.” Accessed August 30, 2017. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “Diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.” AACE Diabetes Resource Center. Accessed August 30, 2017. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. “Diabetes & Prediabetes Tests.” April 2014. Accessed August 30, 2017. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Continue reading >>

What Are “normal” Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are “normal” Blood Sugar Levels?

Physicians focus so much ondisease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What are Normal Blood Sugar Levels? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate.) Ranges of blood sugar for healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) * Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: Pre-diabetes: (or impaired fasting glucose): fasting blood sugar 100–125 mg/dl (5.56–6.94 mmol/l) Pre-diabetes: (or impaired glucose tolerance): blood sugar 140–199 mg/dl (7.78–11.06 mmol/l) two hours after ingesting 75 grams of glucose Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

Site Map Blood sugar test Random blood sugar; Blood sugar level; Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including brain cells. Carbohydrates are found in fruit, cereal, bread, pasta, and rice. They are quickly turned into glucose in your body. This raises your blood glucose level. Hormones made in the body help control blood glucose level. Images How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How to Prepare for the Test The test may be done in the following ways: After you have not eaten anything for at least 8 hours (fasting) At any time of the day (random) Two hours after you drink a certain amount of glucose (oral glucose tolerance test) How the Test will Feel When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away. Why the Test is Performed Your doctor may order this test if you have signs of diabetes. More than likely, the doctor will order a fasting blood sugar test. The blood glucose test is also used to monitor people who already have diabetes. The test may also be done if you have: An increase in how often you need to urinate Recently gained a lot of weight Blurred vision Confusion or a change in the way you normally talk or behave Fainting spells Seizures (for the first time) SCREENING FOR DIABETES This test may also be used to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. A fasting blood sugar test is almost always done to screen for diabetes. If Continue reading >>

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