diabetestalk.net

Quick Fix For High Blood Sugar

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

5 Foods That Lower Your Blood Sugar Quickly

Eating a whole foods, plant-based diet is one of the simplest ways to manage your blood sugar and elevate your health to a whole new level. Your blood sugar controls several different hormonal responses in the body, all of which contribute to your energy, your mood, and even your hunger levels. Healthy blood sugars are also vital to prevent or manage Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hypoglycemia. Eating a diet that supports your blood sugar can also help prevent obesity. Plant-based foods are jam-packed with fiber, which is the main reason they’re so supportive of blood sugar levels. Fiber slows down the release of sugar within the bloodstream, which helps steady insulin levels. This prevents those blood sugar “ups and downs” that foods high in refined sugars, animal foods, and highly- processed foods can cause. To take care of your blood sugar, all you have to do is prioritize higher fiber sources of whole foods versus foods lower in fiber, such as foods with refined or added sugars, animal products (which dramatically raise insulin), and most processed foods. To keep things easy and simple, focus on eating foods that do support your blood sugar instead of focusing on those that don’t. As you’ll see, there are some pretty delicious plant-based foods and meals you can make with them that support your blood sugar. These foods will keep you energized, satisfied, provide your body with vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and even some protein too! 1. Magnesium-Rich Leafy Greens All leafy greens such as: kale, spinach, romaine, arugula, collards, turnip greens, all lettuces, Swiss chard, dandelion greens, and any other green you can think of, are absolutely wonderful for your blood sugar. However, a few are especially rich in magnesium, which is acts like a Continue reading >>

Lower Blood Sugar Fast Emergency

Lower Blood Sugar Fast Emergency

aps school calender 2017-2018 nationstar mortgage llc loss draft department horry county school calendar 2017 2018 Who We Are Our Clients Shipping Info Military Order Info Govt/State Orders Contact Us E-Mail Us Privacy & Security Terms of Use Returns/Exchanges Customer Service Robux generator picture human verification High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in diabetes occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood rises above normal.. Unlike low blood sugar, high blood sugar usually develops slowly over hours or days. Blood. Usually people who take insulin need to take extra fast-acting insulin when their blood sugar levels are high. Blood sugar levels that are too high or too low can quickly turn into a diabetic emergency without quick and appropriate treatment. The best way to avoid dangerously high or low blood glucose levels is to self-test to stay in tune with your body and to stay attuned to the symptoms and risk factors for hypoglycemia, diabetic . Lowering blood sugar is important because when blood sugar is high, inflammation can occur and destroy tissues. Diabetics and people with hyperglycemia need to be aware of their sugar intake and keep the sugar in the blood at low levels. According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, . When your glucose levels spike and there are no emergency medical resources around, here are some ways to quickly and naturally lower your blood sugar. Look for. If you have tested your blood sugar and notice that it is high, a quick fix to lower your blood sugar is exercising. If you are experiencing no symptoms of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, it is safe to exercise. It is not safe to exercise, however, if you are experiencing ketoacidosis or have ketones in your urine, because exercise . Jan 10, 201 Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the underlying condition that is present in all forms of diabetes. Most people believe that insulin resistance is only present in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, however ample research shows that insulin resistance is also present in type 1 diabetes (1-3). It is a common misconception that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience insulin resistance. Even many doctors believe that insulin resistance only affects people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and that by nature of being “skinny” or “normoweight,” people with type 1 diabetes are insulin sensitive. This information cannot be farther from the truth. In my practice, more than 95% of my clients with type 1 diabetes are insulin resistant, and 100% of my clients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant. If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you probably have picked up on the fact that I’m a huge fan of maximizing insulin effectiveness over managing blood glucose. The reason for this is actually quite simple: Trying to control blood glucose without addressing insulin resistance is akin to frequently washing your car and never fixing problems under the hood. Addressing the root cause of blood glucose variability – insulin resistance – is the most successful method of controlling blood glucose. Period. The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster Perhaps you’ve been in this situation before: you wake up in the morning, your blood glucose is 50 points over the normal range. You don’t know why. You eat a standard breakfast, bolus the same amount of insulin that you always give yourself for breakfast, and then continue on with your day. Two hours later, when you check your blood glucose, and it is still high. This time it is 150 points above the norma Continue reading >>

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

6 Best Tips To Lower Blood Pressure When You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, you’ve probably already started counting carbs and exercising more to keep your blood sugar stable. But you may be neglecting another, often silent problem that can go hand-in-hand with diabetes: high blood pressure. Also known as hypertension, the condition occurs in as many as two-thirds of people with diabetes. If you have both conditions and either is out of control, your risk of blood vessel damage increases, heightening the likelihood of complications like heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. If both conditions are unmanaged, the risk is even greater. Here are six suggestions to help keep your blood pressure in check. RELATED: Have Diabetes? Why You Need to Know Your Blood Pressure Numbers 1. Get up and move Exercise is an important part of any healthy lifestyle. It strengthens the heart and makes it pump more efficiently, so it is particularly critical if you have hypertension. To improve cardiovascular health and maintain your weight, try to get 150 minutes each week of aerobic activity. You want to spread this over at least three days, with no more than two consecutive days without exercise. This can include walking, cycling and swimming. 2. Eat fresh, natural foods If you find yourself struggling to figure out which foods in the grocery aisles have too much sodium, here’s a good tip to follow: Food in its natural state is best. Skip over processed foods and opt for fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. 3. Reduce salt If you are planning to start a low-sodium diet (no more than 1,500 mg per day), the first step is to get rid of the salt shaker. In its place, use salt-free herbs, spices and other seasonings. It’s also important to watch for hidden sodium in the foods you eat. The following items are typically hi Continue reading >>

How To Lower High Blood Sugar?

How To Lower High Blood Sugar?

From our community blog: Hi all, Petunia has a question for us about lowering high blood sugar: “I would like to know what can I do to bring down my sugar. I have Type 2 diabetes, I’m on Actraphane 30/70 and I don’t have a proper diabetes diet.” What do you suggest? The obvious ones that spring to mind are: Eat lots of fresh vegetables, wholegrains, lean protein and no refined carbohydrates. Steer clear of sweet treats. Drink lots of water. Exercise a little every day – even if it’s just a walk around the block. Lose weight if necessary. What do you have to add? Let’s help Petunia out! Comments: Hi, I am also Type 2 – I find the best thing is exercise. Sometimes you can’t avoid the carbs, but if you walk, run or cycle 30 min per day – you can reduce your sugar levels significantly. Victor Dear Petunia, Diabetes is not an easy quick fix ever. It is important to manage this condition in the best way always and this means getting a lot of HELP! I suggest you find a dietician or a diabetes educator in your area and schedule an appointment a soon as possible. In order to understand this condition it’s important to understand how food and your medication impact on your glucose levels. It becomes so easy with this help! Fiona Posted on: Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication

10 Ways To Control High Blood Pressure Without Medication

By making these 10 lifestyle changes, you can lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease. If you've been diagnosed with high blood pressure, you might be worried about taking medication to bring your numbers down. Lifestyle plays an important role in treating your high blood pressure. If you successfully control your blood pressure with a healthy lifestyle, you might avoid, delay or reduce the need for medication. Here are 10 lifestyle changes you can make to lower your blood pressure and keep it down. 1. Lose extra pounds and watch your waistline Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep (sleep apnea), which further raises your blood pressure. Weight loss is one of the most effective lifestyle changes for controlling blood pressure. Losing just 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) can help reduce your blood pressure. Besides shedding pounds, you generally should also keep an eye on your waistline. Carrying too much weight around your waist can put you at greater risk of high blood pressure. In general: Men are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 40 inches (102 centimeters). Women are at risk if their waist measurement is greater than 35 inches (89 centimeters). These numbers vary among ethnic groups. Ask your doctor about a healthy waist measurement for you. 2. Exercise regularly Regular physical activity — at least 30 minutes most days of the week — can lower your blood pressure by 4 to 9 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg). It's important to be consistent because if you stop exercising, your blood pressure can rise again. If you have slightly high blood pressure (prehypertension), exercise can help you avoid developing full-blown hypertension. If you already have hyp Continue reading >>

Bariatric Surgery – Quick Fix For Type 2 Diabetes?

Bariatric Surgery – Quick Fix For Type 2 Diabetes?

Recent research has sparked ongoing debate about whether bariatric surgery is a fix for type 2 diabetes. Researchers are conducting studies to determine if this surgery can halt or prevent diabetes. Learn more about bariatric surgery and what researchers have discovered about its connection with type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery physically shrinks the stomach to help severely obese people lose weight. Severe obesity (a BMI over 40) is a chronic condition that can be difficult to treat with diet and exercise alone. Bariatric surgery is done on the stomach and/or intestines. It restricts the intake of food or interrupts how food is digested. Most candidates cannot lose weight any other way. It can be done with banding which is less invasive or with surgical removal of a portion of the stomach/intestines with staples. Stomach stapling is more invasive and permanent. These surgeries require some prior psychological testing since it can have a dramatic impact on your life. You and your physician will decide which procedure is best for you. Most candidates who have these surgeries have multiple health problems including diabetes. After surgery, people must eat a healthy diet with reduced portions and exercise regularly. These procedures require constant follow up and one needs to keep all appointments to reduce future problems. The New England Journal of Medicine recently reported on a large study in Sweden. It showed fewer people developed type 2 diabetes after having bariatric surgery. The study indicated obesity surgery can reverse diabetes, keep it away for years and possibly prevent people from getting the disease. The study was done at Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. It followed patients who had stomach stapling or bands as well as patients recei Continue reading >>

How To Lower High Blood Sugar Quickly – 7 Ways To Reduce Blood Sugar

How To Lower High Blood Sugar Quickly – 7 Ways To Reduce Blood Sugar

If you’re worried about high blood sugar or you would like a way to lower high blood sugar quickly, you’ve come to the right place. I’m going to give you 7 ways to reduce blood sugar and get your blood sugar in normal ranges. But before I get to that, just know that you’re fully capable of lowering your blood sugar. With a little bit of diligence on your part and paying attention to what your body is telling you, you can get things under control. I know it can be discouraging at times. But even though I don’t know you, I’m sure you’ve overcome many obstacles or challenges in your life. And type 2 diabetes is no different. OK let’s go… Lower High Blood Sugar Quickly – 7 Ways To Reduce Blood Sugar Check your blood sugar. I mean really. Check like crazy. I recommend before meals, and 2 hours after meals. Then I recommend checking before bedtime and upon waking hours in the morning. You have to know what is going on with your body. Also you can get an idea of what is working and when your blood sugar is the highest. This one piece of advice has helped so many people it’s not even funny. There are ways to check your blood sugar that make it so easy you’ll never fret about testing. I’ll tell you more on that in a minute. But testing is really the Key to getting your blood sugar levels perfect again. Eat foods that lower blood sugar. In some of my previous articles I wrote about the glucose lowering effects of many of the foods, herbs and spices that can be found in our refrigerator and kitchen cabinets. And for their blood sugar lowering abilities, I’d recommend you add some of the following to your diet: nuts (like walnuts, almonds, peanuts), avocado, cinnamon, stevia, green or black tea, vinegar, garlic and onions. Cut out the sugar. Cut out the Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes: Does It Help? How Is It Taken?

For many years, apple cider vinegar has been linked with an array of health benefits. These have ranged from aiding weight loss to relieving cold symptoms. But does taking it help people with diabetes? The majority of the health claims around apple cider vinegar have yet to be supported by clinical research. However, evidence has been emerging to suggest that apple cider vinegar may have certain benefits for the management of type 2 diabetes. This article will discuss the research behind this claim and how apple cider vinegar should be taken, if at all. What is apple cider vinegar? Vinegar can be made from nearly any carbohydrate. Apple cider vinegar is derived from cider or freshly pressed apple juice. Like most vinegars, apple cider vinegar is produced after a slow process spanning several weeks or months in which sugars are broken down. Mother of vinegar is a cobweb-like substance made from yeast and bacteria that builds up during this period. Mother of vinegar gives the vinegar a cloudy appearance and it is only present in unfiltered apple cider vinegar. It is thought to boost the vinegar's nutritional value. However, most vinegar is pasteurized. This heating process kills bacteria but prevents mother of vinegar from forming. Apple cider vinegar and diabetes In 1980, there were around 108 million people with diabetes worldwide. Its prevalence has increased greatly over the past few decades to an estimated 422 million. Diabetes is a chronic condition marked by an inability to manage blood sugar levels appropriately. The hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels is called insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce this hormone. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to produce enough insulin or respond appropriately to the hormone. People c Continue reading >>

How To Control Your Blood Sugar

How To Control Your Blood Sugar

Author's Perspective: When I was diabetic, I learned very quickly that there were hundreds of ways to lower my blood sugar. I also met a lot of marketing/sales people, MLMers and charlatans selling supplements and other products that they claim would lower my blood sugar. But, during my research, I discovered that there was more to diabetes than just lowering my blood sugar. Unfortunately, most people with diabetes are not aware of this. As a result, they go looking for the "quick fix" and after wasting their time and money, they eventually learn that a "quick fix" is not the answer to their diabetes. If someone approaches you with a product that promises to lower your blood sugar, do your home work first. Talk to a real diabetes expert who understands diabetes -- don't rely on their marketing people to bamboozle you. Also, before you spend your money, read our web page about the 8 warning signs of a diabetes scam. When I was diabetic, I realized that there were 4 key factors that affected me being able to control my blood sugar and keep it in the normal range: nutrition, lifestyle, blood glucose testing, and medications (temporarily). And, because I had help from my mother and daughter, I was able to control my blood sugar by addressing these 4 key areas. For example, my mother and daughter took care of the house and preparing my meals. In addition, I was on paid disability leave from work. So I had a lot of free time to test my blood sugar and make adjustments to (lower) my insulin dosages. I also had time to modify my lifestyle by exercising two times a day. In addition, because I didn't have to worry about preparing meals or going to work, I was under a lot less stress. As a result, I was able to make significant progress in a short period of time. Author Sidebar: D Continue reading >>

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

Smoothies For Diabetes And High Blood Pressure

The smoothie is a popular drink that has been gaining a lot of traction lately. Everyone is into the smoothie craze. There are some that can help you lose weight fast, and there are some intended to increase energy. There are even smoothies for diabetes and smoothies for high blood pressure. What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition where the amount of sugar in your blood is too high. This happens because of two things. First, your body either does not respond to insulin. Or second, your body can’t produce insulin. Insulin is responsible for turning sugar into food for your body’s cells. There are two types of diabetes. First is type 1, where your body cannot produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes is when your body can’t use insulin or can’t produce the right amount of insulin your body needs. What Is High Blood Pressure? This condition is also known as hypertension. It is known as the “silent killer.” This is because it has no obvious symptoms. Many people are not aware if they have it. High blood pressure means your blood is pumping through your heart and blood vessels with too much force. Relationship between Diabetes and High Blood Pressure It is not known why there is a connection between the two diseases. However, it is widely assumed that obesity, inactivity, and a high-fat and high-sodium diet lead to both conditions. Around 25 percent of people with type 1 diabetes have high blood pressure. In addition, 80 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have high blood pressure. People with diabetes have to constantly monitor their blood pressure. Luckily, even if you have the two conditions, that doesn’t mean you have to miss out. Here are smoothies for diabetes and high blood pressure you can try for yourselves. Smoothies for Diabetes Smoothies for d Continue reading >>

Emergency Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

Emergency Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

High blood sugar is usually a diabetic medical condition, where the body cannot regulate its own blood sugar levels. A diabetic must take insulin in order to regulate his or her blood sugar, but if you have type 1 diabetes and there is no insulin available, or the wrong amount of insulin is taken, your blood sugar can shoot up. If you have type 2 diabetes and your body is not processing insulin like it should, your blood sugar levels can also rise. Hyperglycemia, or extremely high blood sugar, can occur in both scenarios. Symptoms of Hyperglycemia and Ketoacidosis If your blood sugar too high, you may start to experience strange symptoms. These symptoms include frequent urination, frequent thirst, high blood glucose levels and high sugar levels in the urine. If you continue to ignore these symptoms without treating them, you could go into a diabetic coma, also known as ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body begins to break down fat cells to use as energy instead of glucose. This is a highly dangerous condition. As your body begins to break down the fat cells, it will create a waste product called ketones, which will be released through the urine. Your doctor can test to see if you have ketones in your urine. Other symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea and vomiting, sweet-smelling breath, dry mouth and shortness of breath. Treating High Blood Sugar Yourself If you have tested your blood sugar and notice that it is high, a quick fix to lower your blood sugar is exercising. If you are experiencing no symptoms of hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis, it is safe to exercise. It is not safe to exercise, however, if you are experiencing ketoacidosis or have ketones in your urine, because exercise can make your blood sugar levels shoot up higher. Ketones generally occur in Continue reading >>

Best Bites To Boost Low Blood Sugar

Best Bites To Boost Low Blood Sugar

Picture this: You're in the mall, shopping with friends, chatting and having a great time when suddenly you start to feel a bit strange. You might become irritated or nervous, your skin may feel clammy or sweaty — and your vision may even seem blurred. If you have diabetes, you'll recognize these as the warning signs of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. “Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar levels in the body drop too low,” says Kelly O'Connor, RD, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator at LifeBridge Health's Northwest Hospital in Baltimore. “Glucose [sugar] is your brain’s main energy or fuel source. If the level of glucose in the body is too low, it can begin to affect your brain’s functioning. The resulting symptoms are more or less your body’s warning system that you need to take quick action in order to correct the problem.” Recognizing the Signs of Hypoglycemia O’Connor says there are a number of warning signs that indicate you might have low blood sugar. “The symptoms can range from very mild — shakiness, clamminess, feeling irritable or jittery, and having temporarily blurred vision — to much more severe, such as [experiencing] seizures and loss of consciousness or passing out, although these are less common,” she says. These symptoms can occur because of many other circumstances, so if you are diabetic and are having symptoms that could be due to low blood sugar, check your sugar levels to see what’s going on, she adds. Certain things can also put you at higher risk of hypoglycemia, especially if you skip or put off a meal or snack, take too much insulin, don't eat enough carbohydrates, exercise more than you regularly do, or drink alcohol. In addition, people with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia more often than those wi Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar