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Pre Diabetes Symptoms Nhs

Symptoms

Symptoms

The symptoms of type 1 diabetes can develop very quickly (over a few days or weeks), particularly in children. In older adults, the symptoms can often take longer to develop (a few months). However, they should disappear when you start taking insulin and the condition is under control. The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itchiness around the genital area, or regular bouts of thrush (a yeast infection) blurred vision caused by the lens of your eye changing shape slow healing of cuts and grazes Vomiting or heavy, deep breathing can also occur at a later stage. This is a dangerous sign and requires immediate admission to hospital for treatment. See your GP if you think you may have diabetes. When to seek urgent medical attention You should seek urgent medical attention if you have diabetes and develop: a loss of appetite nausea or vomiting a high temperature stomach pain fruity smelling breath – which may smell like pear drops or nail varnish (others will usually be able to smell it, but you won't) Hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) If you have diabetes, your blood glucose levels can become very low. This is known as hypoglycaemia (or a "hypo"), and it's triggered when injected insulin in your body moves too much glucose out of your bloodstream. In most cases, hypoglycaemia occurs as a result of taking too much insulin, although it can also develop if you skip a meal, exercise very vigorously or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. Symptoms of a "hypo" include: feeling shaky and irritable sweating tingling lips feeling weak feeling confused hunger nausea (feeling sick) A hypo can be brought under control simply by eating or drinking somethin Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. That's more than one in 16 people in the UK who has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed). This figure has nearly trebled since 1996, when there were 1.4 million. By 2025, it is estimated that 5 million people will have diabetes in the UK. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as prediabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor You should therefore visit your GP as soon as possible if you have symptoms, such as feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual, and feeling tired all the time. Symptoms of diabetes The main symptoms of diabetes are: feeling very thirsty urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. What causes diabetes? The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancr Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

Symptoms Of Diabetes: Seven Signs You Could Have The Condition

The symptoms are not always obvious, and many people could be suffering with the condition for years before they learn they have it. Every week 4,500 people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes across the UK. However, experts warn thousands could be living with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The condition, which can be caused by being overweight and poor diet can cause blindness, limbs to be amputated - every week diabetes causes 150 amputations - and even kidney failure. It has even been linked to a reduce life expectancy if the condition it not managed well. People also need to ensure they look after their feet properly as high levels of blood glucose can cause foot problems. This can stop nerves working so people might not feel when they have cut their feet or burned themselves. The main symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Urinating more often than usual - particularly at night Excessive urination can be triggered by excess glucose in the blood which interferes with the kidney’s ability to concentrate urine. Feeling thirsty Kidneys have to work harder in people with type 2 diabetes. Puldisia is the term given to excessive thirst. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body Feeling tired Feeling tired could be a symptom of many conditions - but it can be caused in people who have low blood sugar. Itching around the penis or vagina Thrush - a yeast infection - tends to affect warm, moist areas of the body such as the vagina, penis, mouth and certain areas Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Nhs Leeds North Clinical Commissioning Group

Diabetes | Nhs Leeds North Clinical Commissioning Group

NHS Leeds North Clinical Commissioning Group Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a persons blood sugar level to become too high.There are two main types of diabetes type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes .Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. There are 3.9 million people living with diabetes in the UK. Thats more than one in 16 people in the UK who has diabetes (diagnosed or undiagnosed). Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes.This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased.Its very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. You should therefore visit your GP as soon as possible if you have symptoms, such as feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual, and feeling tired all the time. urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days.Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general.See your GP if you think you may have diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, whe Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

Prediabetes Label Unhelpful, Experts Argue

“Pre-diabetes label ‘worthless’, researchers claim,” reports the BBC. The headline is based on an opinion piece published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) by John Yudkin and Victor Montori, both of whom are professors of medicine. They argue that diagnosing people with “prediabetes” puts people at risk of unnecessary medicalisation and creates an unsustainable burden on healthcare systems. The piece is part of an ongoing BMJ series called “Too much medicine”, which is examining what is known as over-medicalising – treating “problems” that don’t actually require treatment. They argue that money would be better spent changing food, education, health and economic policies. This is an opinion piece. Although the authors support their opinions with studies, other evidence available could contradict their views. What is meant by ‘prediabetes’? Prediabetes is used to describe people at risk of diabetes because they have impaired glucose metabolism, but who do not meet the criteria for diabetes and often have no noticeable symptoms. It is a term that was introduced by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), but has not been accepted by other health organisations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO). It may be defined as: impaired glucose tolerance above normal glucose blood concentration after fasting above normal glycated haemoglobin (a marker of average blood glucose concentration) Supporters of the term’s usage argue that it allows doctors to identify high-risk patients, so they can be treated in order to prevent diabetes from occurring. What objections do the authors have about the use of the term? The authors point out that there has been little support for the ADA’s prediabetes label from other expert groups, including WHO, the Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Pre-diabetes

Insulin Resistance And Pre-diabetes

Insulin resistance means a person's body doesn't process sugars properly, allowing blood glucose levels to rise. This insulin resistance may not be enough for a diabetes diagnosis , but it may be a sign of a condition called prediabetes . It is estimated that between a third and two-thirds of people with prediabeteswith raised or impaired blood glucose levels will go on to develop type 2 diabetes . Conditions associated with insulin resistance include the following: Normally, food is absorbed into the bloodstream in the form of sugars such as glucose and other basic substances. The increase in sugar in the bloodstream signals the pancreas - an organ located behind the stomach -to increase the secretion of a hormone called insulin . This hormone attaches to cells, removing sugar from the bloodstream so that it can be used for energy. In insulin resistance, the body's cells have a diminished ability to respond to the action of the insulin hormone. To compensate for the insulin resistance, the pancreas secretes more insulin. People with this condition have insulin resistance and high levels of insulin in the blood as a sign of the condition rather than a cause. Over time, people with insulin resistance can develop high sugar levels or diabetes as the high insulin levels can no longer compensate for elevated sugars. What is the treatment for insulin resistance? Specific prescribed medications are approved to treat the insulin resistance that occurs with type 2 diabetes. These drugs make your body more sensitive to the actions of insulin. Other drugs, such as cholesterol -lowering drugs or anti-hypertensive drugs, are usually necessary to treat the different conditions that are often associated with the insulin resistance. Yes. If you live a healthy lifestyle, you may be ab Continue reading >>

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, is a condition that develops before someone gets type 2 diabetes. It’s also known as impaired fasting glucose or glucose intolerance. It basically means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but they’re not quite high enough to be considered diabetes. During the prediabetes phase, your pancreas usually still produces enough insulin in response to ingested carbohydrates. The insulin is less effective at removing the sugar from the bloodstream, though, so your blood sugar remains high. This condition is called insulin resistance. If you have prediabetes, you should know you’re not alone. In 2015, it was estimated that 84.1 million people age 18 and older had the condition. That’s 1 in 3 Americans. Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you’ll definitely develop diabetes. It is a warning of what could lie ahead, however. People with prediabetes have a 5 to 15-fold higher risk for type 2 diabetes than someone with normal blood sugar levels. Those chances increase if you don’t make any healthy changes to your diet or activity habits. “Prediabetes is not pre-problem,” says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Someone with insulin resistance in its early stages can develop type 2 diabetes if it continues long enough. Only 10 percent of people with prediabetes even know they have it because they don’t display any symptoms. “Often, people consider these symptoms part of their normal day, so they’re ignored,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and co-author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Any of these risk factors can increase your chances of developing prediabetes: being inacti Continue reading >>

Overview

Overview

Hyperglycaemia occurs when there's a higher than normal level of glucose in the blood. It's generally found in people with diabetes. Brought to you by NHS Choices Introduction There are two types of diabetes: type 1 (insulin-dependent) and type 2 (non-insulin dependent). Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin. Insulin is a hormone that's released by the pancreas and helps the body to control its blood sugar level. If you have type 1 diabetes you'll require life-long treatment, and will need to check the level of sugar (glucose) in your blood regularly. The condition needs to be carefully monitored in order to prevent any complications from developing. Type 2 or non-insulin dependent diabetes In type 2 diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, or cannot use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. This type of diabetes is usually linked to obesity. It is sometimes referred to as maturity onset diabetes because it occurs mostly in people over the age of 40. Hyperglycaemia often only affects people with type 1 diabetes. If you have hyperglycaemia, it's normally easy to recognise the signs, and you can take appropriate steps to get it back to normal. This will usually involve adjusting the level of insulin (which is normally taken by people with type 1 diabetes) to control your condition. If you have type 2 diabetes, you can manage your diabetes by carefully controlling your diet, or by using a combination of diet and tablets. There are some people with type 2 diabetes who also need to take insulin. Symptoms Symptoms of hyperglycaemia Symptoms of hyperglycaemia are the same as those of untreated diabetes. They do not appear suddenly, but develop gradually, over a period of time. Symptoms include: th Continue reading >>

Southview Medical Practice - Pre-diabetes

Southview Medical Practice - Pre-diabetes

The surgery address and telephone numbers YOUR GUIDE TO PRE-DIABETES Printable PDF Pre-diabetes is the name given to those patients who are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Other names your GP may have used include non diabetic hyperglycaemia, impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose all of which relate to someone having a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes compared with the general population. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is a serious condition where the body cannot keep blood glucose (sugar) levels within a healthy range. We know this can develop over a long time and by the time people find out they have diabetes they often have complications caused by their diabetes such as eye or kidney disease. Pre-diabetes is the stage where blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as diabetes. However, without intervention pre-diabetes is likely to become type 2 diabetes in 10 years or less. It means you're drinking in the last chance saloon if you want to avoid a condition, which increases your risk of heart attack, kidney damage, blindness and amputation. But it also carries risks in its own right, even if you feel perfectly healthy. Often pre-diabetes has no symptoms and is found on routine testing of you blood sugar. At this practice we often test your HBA1C. This blood test measures what your blood glucose (sugar) levels have been over the past 8-12 weeks. There are three main things that contribute to becoming prediabetic, and the progression to diabetes: 1. What you eat: Being overweight affects the bodys ability to process sugar in the blood. 2. What you do: Long periods of inactivity (e.g. watching television all evening) reduce the ability of insulin to deal with sugar in the blood. By the same token, be Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin These pages are about type 2 diabetes. Read more about type 1 diabetes. Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear after birth. Symptoms of diabetes The symptoms of diabetes occur because the lack of insulin means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to reduce blood glucose levels by getting rid of the excess glucose in your urine. Typical symptoms include: passing urine more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very thirsty feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk Read more about the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible as it will get progressively worse if left untreated. Read about how type 2 diabetes is diagnosed. See your GP if you think you have diabetes. Causes of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. This means glucose stays in the blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Type 2 diabetes is often associated with obesity and tends to be diagnosed in older people. It's far more common than type 1 diabetes. Read more about the causes and risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Treating type 2 diabetes As type 2 diabetes usually gets worse, you may event Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes include feeling very thirsty, passing more urine than usual, and feeling tired all the time. The symptoms occur because some or all of the glucose stays in your blood and isn't used as fuel for energy. Your body tries to get rid of the excess glucose in your urine. The main symptoms, which are common to both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, are: urinating more often than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired unexplained weight loss cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision – caused by the lens of the eye becoming dry The signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes are usually obvious and develop very quickly, often over a few weeks. These signs and symptoms aren't always as obvious, however, and it's often diagnosed during a routine check-up. This is because they are often mild and develop gradually over a number of years. This means you may have type 2 diabetes for many years without realising it. See your GP as soon as possible if you think you may have diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment for type 2 diabetes is very important as it may reduce your risk of developing complications later on. Hyperglycaemia Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach, can't produce enough insulin to control your blood glucose level, or when the cells in your body don't respond properly to the insulin that is produced. This means your blood glucose levels may become very high, and is known as hyperglycaemia. Hyperglycaemia can occur for several reasons, including: eating too much being unwell ineffective diabetes medication, or not taking enough Hyperglycaemia causes the main symptoms of diabetes, which include extreme thirst and frequent urination. Next review due: 27/06/2018 Type 2 diabetes occurs when t Continue reading >>

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