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Pre Diabetes Symptoms And Treatment

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

7 Silent Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes

A little fatigue. An extra five pounds you can’t shake. A bruise that just won’t heal. None of these symptoms are especially eyebrow-raising on their own. But taken together, they could be signs of a silent epidemic that’s affecting more and more women across the country: pre-diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that at least 86 million Americans—more than one in three—have the condition, which is marked by blood sugar levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify as diabetic. But as many as nine in 10 sufferers don’t know they have it, says Ashita Gupta, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “That’s because it’s common for people to feel perfectly normal and healthy while the disease is progressing,” she explains. Still, there are signs and symptoms you can watch out for. And you should, since pre-diabetes can be treated and reversed through dietary tweaks and healthy lifestyle changes when it’s caught earlier. But the longer it goes undiagnosed and untreated, the greater the chance of it turning into full-blown diabetes, which is much harder to rebound from. So in honor of November, which is American Diabetes Month, we asked Gupta to share some of the most common red flags of pre-diabetes. If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms on the slides ahead, ask your doctor to test you as soon as possible. Sudden spikes and dips in your blood sugar (which are common in those with pre-diabetes) can impair your eye’s ability to bend and focus, leading to blurred vision, says Gupta. The blurriness should go away once you get your sugar levels back into normal range. (Here are 10 other Surprising Things Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health.) One of the more well-known sig Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Signs You Might Have Prediabetes And Increased Risk Of Stroke

Diabetes - Signs You Might Have Prediabetes And Increased Risk Of Stroke

Prediabetes is stage before type 2 diabetes diagnosis Lifestyle changes could bring blood glucose back to normal levels Few symptoms noticed as condition develops gradually Type 2 diabetes symptoms include fatigue, urinating more often than normal and having an unquenchable thirst Prediabetes is diagnosed by doctors when blood glucose is in danger of reaching type 2 diabetes levels. The number of people in England with prediabetes trebled in the eight years to 2011. One in three adults have the condition in the UK, according to Diabetes.co.uk. But, making dietary changes and doing more physical exercise could return blood sugar levels back to normal. Those with prediabetes don’t usually notice any symptoms, as the condition develops gradually. Some patients are only diagnosed with the condition after type 2 diabetes symptoms begin to develop. These include blurred vision, fatigue, sudden weight loss, urinating more often than normal, often feeling hungry, and having an unquenchable thirst. Diabetes patients are also at greater risk of strokes. In turn, this means prediabetes patients were at greater risk, too. Prediabetes patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, including transient ischemic attack, stroke, and recurrent stroke A study from the University of Belgrade this year said: “More than two thirds of prediabetes patients go on to develop type 2 diabetes. “Prediabetes patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, including transient ischemic attack, stroke, and recurrent stroke.” Those most at risk of developing prediabetes are those that are overweight, or have high blood pressure. Having a close relative who currently has, or had diabetes also increase the risk. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health co Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Symptoms: Are They A Reliable Indicator?

Prediabetes Symptoms: Are They A Reliable Indicator?

During your latest doctor’s appointment, your physician breaks the news that you have prediabetes. It means your blood-sugar levels are elevated, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes. You’re surprised not only by the diagnosis, but also by the fact that you experienced no prediabetes symptoms. After all, you reason, if you have a medical condition, wouldn’t you know it? But with prediabetes symptoms, they aren’t a reliable indicator of your condition because most of the time prediabetes offers up no telltale warning signs. Once you do experience symptoms, there’s a good chance you’ve already progressed to type 2 diabetes. To thwart this progression and safeguard your cardiovascular health, take action now by changing your lifestyle, improving your overall health (a diabetic diet will help), and, if necessary, following your doctor’s recommendations regarding medical therapy. Prediabetes Symptoms Are Silent Some 15 to 30 percent of people with prediabetes symptoms progress to type 2 diabetes within five years if they fail to make appropriate lifestyle changes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are diagnosed based on the following test results: Prediabetes Fasting glucose test: 100–125 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) Oral glucose tolerance test: 140–199 mg/dL Hemoglobin A1c: 5.7–6.4 percent Type 2 diabetes Fasting glucose test: 126 mg/dL or higher Oral glucose tolerance test: 200 mg/dL or higher Hemoglobin A1c: 6.5 percent or higher Trouble is, unless you see your doctor and get tested, there’s no way to know for certain if you’re on the path to type 2 diabetes. That’s because prediabetes symptoms are virtually nonexistent. Rather, symptoms aren’t likely to occur Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition where people don't produce enough insulin to meet their body's needs and/or their cells don't respond properly to insulin. Insulin is important because it moves glucose, a simple sugar, into the body's cells from the blood. It also has a number of other effects on metabolism. The food that people eat provides the body with glucose, which is used by the cells as a source of energy. If insulin isn't available or doesn't work correctly to move glucose from the blood into cells, glucose will stay in the blood. High blood glucose levels are toxic, and cells that don't get glucose are lacking the fuel they need. There are two main kinds of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. More than 90% of all people with diabetes have type 2. A 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) report estimated that about 3.4 million Canadians have diabetes. Only about two-thirds of people with type 2 diabetes are aware of it and are receiving treatment because, for many people, early symptoms are not noticeable without testing. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot make insulin. Everyone with type 1 diabetes requires insulin injections. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not make enough insulin or the body does not use insulin properly. It usually occurs in adults, although in some cases children may be affected. People with type 2 diabetes usually have a family history of this condition and are most often overweight. People with type 2 diabetes may eventually need insulin injections. This condition occurs most commonly in people of First Nations descent, Hispanics, and North Americans of African descent. Another less common form is gestational diabetes, a temporary condition that occurs during pregnancy. According to the CDA, depend Continue reading >>

Prediabetes – Know The Symptoms, Signs, Risks, Causes & Lifestyle Changes

Prediabetes – Know The Symptoms, Signs, Risks, Causes & Lifestyle Changes

Prediabetes? Is it for real? The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Govt., says “prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal—but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.” Blood glucose (sugar) levels are one the symptoms of prediabetes that people ignore. What Is Prediabetes? The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. Those with fasting blood sugar above 126 mg/DL or HbA1c 6.5% are said to have diabetes. Most of us think – we’re fine, going about our business, like normal. Then we visit the doc; either just for a regular physical or because we feel we’re using the washroom a lot more than before, so let’s figure out what’s happening. He/she orders some tests, the results arrive with a red mark against the blood sugar number and boom – we now have diabetes! That’s not quite how it all happens. Elevated levels of insulin and blood sugar cause diabetes damage to you body for years before you’re actually labelled “diabetic”. That period, often lasting years, is called prediabetes. It is like you are “on the fence.” Many experts refer to this condition as “borderline diabetes.” The mechanism through which elevated sugar and insulin levels harm your body is being better understood each day. The sooner we are able to catch the symptoms, the sooner we can prevent full blown diabetes from harming us. RELATED: Take A Prediabetes Risk Test Causes of Prediabetes While the exact causes of prediabetes is yet unknown, family history and genetics seem to play a role in its development. A sedentary, stressful lifestyle and poor food choices and Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes

What Is It? In pre-diabetes, blood sugar levels are slightly higher than normal, but still not as high as in diabetes. If diabetes is "runaway blood sugar" think of pre-diabetes as blood sugar that is "halfway out the door." People almost always develop pre-diabetes before they get type 2 diabetes. The rise in blood sugar levels that is seen in pre-diabetes starts when the body begins to develop a problem called "insulin resistance." Insulin is an important hormone that helps you to process glucose (blood sugar). If usual amounts of insulin can't trigger the body to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into your cells, then you have insulin resistance. Once insulin resistance begins, it can worsen over time. When you have pre-diabetes, you make extra insulin to keep your sugar levels near to normal. Insulin resistance can worsen as you age, and it worsens with weight gain. If your insulin resistance progresses, eventually you can't compensate well enough by making extra insulin. When this occurs, your sugar levels will increase, and you will have diabetes. Depending on what a blood sugar test finds, pre-diabetes can be more specifically called "impaired glucose (sugar) tolerance" or "impaired fasting glucose." Impaired fasting glucose means that blood sugar increase after you haven't eaten for a while – for example, in the morning, before breakfast. Impaired glucose tolerance means that blood sugar levels reach a surprisingly high level after you eat sugar. To diagnose impaired glucose tolerance, doctors usually use what is called a "glucose tolerance test." For this test you drink a sugary solution, and then you have blood drawn after a short time. Having pre-diabetes does not automatically mean you will get diabetes, but it does put you at an increased risk. Pre- Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes – where the body's immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin type 2 diabetes – where the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or the body's cells don't react to insulin Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 1. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2. During pregnancy, some women have such high levels of blood glucose that their body is unable to produce enough insulin to absorb it all. This is known as gestational diabetes. Pre-diabetes Many more people have blood sugar levels above the normal range, but not high enough to be diagnosed as having diabetes. This is sometimes known as pre-diabetes. If your blood sugar level is above the normal range, your risk of developing full-blown diabetes is increased. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. When to see a doctor Visit your GP as soon as possible if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes, which include: urinating more frequently than usual, particularly at night feeling very tired weight loss and loss of muscle bulk cuts or wounds that heal slowly blurred vision Type 1 diabetes can develop quickly over weeks or even days. Many people have type 2 diabetes for years without realising because the early symptoms tend to be general. Causes of diabetes The amount of sugar in the blood is controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is produced by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach). When food is digested and enters your bloodstream, insulin moves glucose out of the blood and into cells, where it's broken down to produce ene Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Pre-diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Pre-diabetes

How do I find out if I have pre-diabetes (or diabetes)? Understanding symptoms related to high blood sugar In addition to these tests, there are a number of symptoms that may be used to help diagnose diabetes, and people with pre-diabetes may already have one or more of these symptoms. However, many people with untreated pre-diabetes or diabetes have not yet had any of these symptoms. The tests mentioned above are the only way to know for sure. Symptoms can include: Unusually frequent urination Feeling very thirsty - even though you are getting plenty of water Feeling very hungry - even though you are eating Extreme fatigue Blurry vision Cuts/bruises that are slow to heal Tingling, pain, or numbness in the hands/feet If you are at risk, your healthcare provider will need to perform one of the following tests to determine whether you have pre-diabetes or diabetes. Blood Sugar Testing The ranges and targets given may be considered in combination or your healthcare provider may initially rely on a single method and may repeat the test to verify it. A1C (pronounced A-One-C) This test measures the average blood sugar over the past 2-3 months. A result over 5.7 indicates pre-diabetes, and a result over 6.5 indicates diabetes. Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG) This test measures blood sugar after you've gone at least 8 hours without eating or drinking anything other than water. A result over 100 indicates pre-diabetes, and a result over 126 indicates diabetes. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) OGTT requires drinking a special sweet drink and comparing the blood sugar readings right before drinking and then again two hours after drinking it. A result over 140 indicates pre-diabetes, and a result over 200 indicates diabetes. How often should I be checked for improvement or decline? Continue reading >>

Prediabetes - Symptoms

Prediabetes - Symptoms

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren's contracture when a "cord" can be felt. It is not known if XIAFLEX® is safe and effective in children under the age of 18. Do not receive XIAFLEX® if you have had an allergic reaction to collagenase clostridium histolyticum or any of the ingredients in XIAFLEX®, or to any other collagenase product. See the end of the Medication Guide for a complete list of ingredients in XIAFLEX®. XIAFLEX® can cause serious side effects, including: Tendon rupture or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX® may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider right away if you get numbness, tingling, increased pain, or tears in the skin (laceration) in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX® because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX®: hives swollen face breathing trouble chest pain low blood pressure dizziness or fainting Increased chance of bleeding. Bleeding or bruising at the injection site can happen in people who receive XIAFLEX®. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have a problem with your blood clotting. XIAFLEX® may not b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

Are You Having Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes?

Are You Having Symptoms Of Pre-diabetes?

The advancements in medical science and technology have had great successes in finding easy cures as well as completely getting rid of some of the diseases which were considered deadly and fatal in the previous centuries. You can take a look at the comparison between cases of tuberculosis, its life expectancy, and advanced treatment in the past twentieth century and current times. The cases have not only gone down to a big extent but most of the diagnosed have been treated successfully. You can actually have many treatment options available for a certain health condition depending on the current state, severity, and your choice. However, looking at the current health concerns and statistics, countries are now facing even worse issues. The previously considered health concerns have now been replaced with others. Coronary heart diseases, COPD, cancer, and diabetes have been listed as the most common causes of death in the United States and rest of the world. One thing you should note about these diseases is that they are interlinked many times. A person with coronary heart diseases is likely to have hypertension and fluctuating blood sugar levels leading to a diagnosis of diabetes or pre-diabetes. Diabetes has been becoming a huge issue in the United States. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Diabetes Statistics report, 37% percent of the population in the US over the age of 18 and 51% of adults over the age of 50 have diabetes symptoms. In addition, the latest report suggests that there are around 86 million adults solely in the United States with pre-diabetes or diabetes symptoms. The number of diabetes patients around the world is expected to increase to 471 million by International Diabetes Foundation. Pre-diabetes is the stage wh Continue reading >>

Symptoms And Treatment Of Pre Diabetes

Symptoms And Treatment Of Pre Diabetes

Symptoms In general, pre-diabetes is a symptom-less disease where most people who have pre-diabetes don’t even realize it. The disease typically only reveals itself during a blood test, but you may also have: Acanthosis nigricans: This is a condition where certain areas of the skin will be darker. Common areas that are affected include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Type 2 diabetes signs: Increased thirst, frequent urination, fatigue and blurred vision are all important to watch out for. If you start to feel these symptoms, then you may be in the later stages of pre-diabetes or early stage of type 2 diabetes. Because pre-diabetes is likely to not reveal any symptoms until it’s turned into type 2 diabetes, it’s important to get routine checkups if you have any of the following risk factors: Over the age of 45 Live a sedentary lifestyle Family history of type 2 diabetes Developed gestational diabetes while pregnant Sleep deprived and overweight If you’re African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American or a Pacific Islander Treatment Pre-diabetes can be reversed, but it requires a lifestyle change. Improving your diet and exercise regimen is vitally important to reversing the effects of pre-diabetes and preventing the development of type 2 diabetes. Also, studies have shown that sleep deprivation and stress cause the body to be less sensitive to insulin. Therefore, it’s important to employ stress management techniques including: yoga, meditation, taking walks, massage and whatever else puts you in relaxed state of mind. There are also certain medications that can be prescribed that will help improve the body’s response to the insulin it makes. If you are unable to regulate your blood glucose levels on your own, then this can be a via Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

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