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Pcos Low Blood Sugar

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Vs. Or Same As Insulin Resistance

Hypoglycemia Vs. Or Same As Insulin Resistance

Hypoglycemia vs. or same as insulin resistance I noticed many of you are on metformin. I have mild PCOS and hypoglycemia quite badly. One practitioner told me this was insulin resistance but if I took metformin I would probably faint or something! Do any of you have symptoms of hypoglycemia (dizzy, hungry, shaking if you don't eat, etc.) I know a low-glycemic diet is recommended for PCOS which also helps hypoglycemia. Hard to figure this out - my gyno said that my PCOS was not related to hypoglycemia which of course is ridiculous, I know it is but don't know why metformin helps people without diabetes.. Thanks! Any google search will show that PCOS and insulin resistance go hand in hand. I was diagnoses in 1999 with PCOS and was told there was only 2 options...go on the bc pill or get preg. He said that for me though I would never be able to get preg due to my weight/PCOS combination. Thanks for nothing Doc! I did a lot of research myself and read that a majority of women with PCOS will develop Type 2 diabetes. So when I got T2 diabetes in 2003, I wasn't really surprised. I was put on Metformin and Glucotrol. The thing with the different diabetes meds are that some help your body process the sugar better and some help lower your insulin resistance. So by lowering the insulin resistance, you are helping not just the diabetes but also the PCOS. Since starting my new medication regimen, I have had my period on time every month and got my blood sugar under control. I definately get shakey and nauseated if I do not eat regularly. I have had boughts that I felt like I was going to pass out. I have recently been put on Metformin and have not had such extreme highs and lows. Have you looked into going to a reproductive endocrinoligist (RE)? This type of dr was my godsend! GL! Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar At Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Pcos, Topic 143920

Low Blood Sugar At Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome Pcos, Topic 143920

Learn How to Destroy Parasites And Be Free of Your Unbearable Symptoms Yes - exactly. The ideal diet for hypoglycemics is the same as for diabetics: eating vegies, proteins, and non-refined grains. That means porridge, not boxed breakfast cereals. It means throwing the Sugar and white flour out of your kitchen and replacing it with real food that comes from the earth. It requires cooking! :) I had horrible hypoglycemia for years, and even though it improved when I began to eat lower glycemic foods, it didn't go away until my hormones found a better balance. (artificially - I switched to the Diane pill). I'm just mentioning that in case it's relevant in your case; it might not be. When my hormones were out of wack, my hypoglycemia was at its worst. Julia Chang relates hypoglycemia to a weak spleen. The spleen, she says, will take care it itself when you cleanse the liver. I am in no way a doctor...but I had what I called bouts of low Sugar also....I called reactive hypoglycemia.....after eating etc...I would become so tired and sleep for hours depending on how much Sugar or carbs I ate...... Do a search on Insulin Resistance....that is what I found out it is called... the suggested help is Chromium it helps to get your metabolism straighted out and cuts the craving for Sugar and carbs...because it helps your body to use the sugars.... after just 3 days of taking it....I feel 100% better....have enough energy to get off the couch... also once you are done studying that...if this applies to you, i found that chelated chromium is better than chromium picolinate......because it is easier absorbed by your body.... chromium is just a naturally occuring amino acid in your body..... Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia In Lean Young Women With Pcos And Correlations With Insulin Sensitivity And With Beta Cell Function.

Reactive Hypoglycemia In Lean Young Women With Pcos And Correlations With Insulin Sensitivity And With Beta Cell Function.

Reactive hypoglycemia in lean young women with PCOS and correlations with insulin sensitivity and with beta cell function. Division of Endocrinology Metabolism Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Reactive hypoglycemia (RH), which is a postprandial hypoglycemic state, occurs within 2-5 h after food intake. It is classified as idiopathic, alimentary, or diabetic reactive hypoglycemia. We studied the incidence of reactive hypoglycemia and looked for any correlations between it and the presence of insulin sensitivity and/or beta cell function in young lean polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study in 64 lean young women with PCOS (BMI < or = 25 kg/m2). Various indices of insulin sensitivity and beta cell function derived from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) results were used. We found the rate of RH to be 50% in lean young women with PCOS. DHEA-S and PRL levels were found to be lower in subjects with RH (P < 0.05 and P > 0.05, respectively). Beta cell function indices such as the insulinogenic index (at 120 min), CIR (at 120 min) and HOMA beta cell index were found to be insignificantly higher in the RH group than the nonreactive hypoglycemia (NRH) group. The 4 h glucose level, but not the 3 h glucose level, was significantly correlated with insulin resistance indices, such as fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, Quicky index, and FIRI in the RH group. Significantly decreased DHEA-S levels were an interesting finding. In conclusion, there is an urgent need to investigate RH in lean young women with PCOS. Our results indicate that more definite insulin resistance occurs in subjects with RH in the fourth hour of the OGTT than those with RH in the third Continue reading >>

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

What Tests Should I Get For Insulin Resistance And Pcos?

Is Insulin Resistance Causing Your PCOS? Insulin resistance and PCOS commonly occur together. Have you got PCOS, but never been tested for insulin resistance? Or maybe you have been tested, but your doctor has told you that your blood sugar is normal? If so, you may have been left wondering what’s causing your PCOS. During my second year at university we did an experiment where were measured our blood glucose levels after eating different foods. We’d just been learning about how blood glucose could be lower in athletes due to higher muscle mass and increased insulin sensitivity. At the time, I was training for 20 hours a week. You can imagine my shock when I found that my results were close to the top end of the normal range. However, when I queried my doctor about this she assured me that it was still within the normal range. She told me that I needn’t be worried. I’m going to explain to you why this is incorrect and why even slight changes in blood glucose can be a sign of insulin resistance. Studies have shown that up to 70% of women with PCOS have insulin resistance. I’m always amazed at the number of women I talk to who have been diagnosed with PCOS, but not tested for insulin resistance. You were not born with PCOS. PCOS is a condition that develops due to your environment interacting with your genes. Your ‘environment’ includes what you eat, how much you exercise, stress levels, environmental toxins, etc. It’s therefore easy to see that there is always something in your environment causing your PCOS. If you can find out what this is then you can remove it, then reverse your PCOS symptoms. I’ve written about the main causes of PCOS and how insulin resistance is the main one. Now I want to further explore insulin resistance: – What is it? – Ho Continue reading >>

Women With Pcos Usually Have High Blood Sugar. But Could You Also Have Hypoglycemia?

Women With Pcos Usually Have High Blood Sugar. But Could You Also Have Hypoglycemia?

Have you ever experienced symptoms like shakiness, sweating, weakness and excessive hunger after a meal? This situation is called "reactive hypoglycemia", or low blood sugar in response to a meal. You've probably heard that women with polycystic ovarian syndrome have a problem with their blood sugar being too high, not too low. The problem is the refined carbohydrates, sweets and sugar in your meals. When you take in a lot of refined carbs and sugar at one time, your blood sugar can increase too much and too fast. So, the body has to respond to this critical problem. For one thing, your body will produce more insulin to bring your blood sugar down. When you're digesting a lot of refined carbs, you tend to overproduce insulin, which makes your blood sugar drop too much. Now have hypoglycemia. By the way, if you always have too much insulin floating around, it stimulates your ovaries to increase male hormone production, and stimulates your pituitary gland to produce more LH (luteinizing hormone). You don't want either of these things to happen. In addition, your pancreas gland can get worn out from producing insulin all the time. At some point, you won't be able to produce enough insulin and you have the chronically high blood sugar levels associated with diabetes. Your adrenal and pituitary glands also respond when you have reactive hypoglycemia after a meal. It appears that in response to hypoglycemia, they produce a number of hormones (cortisol, DHEA, growth hormone, etc.), which have the effect of increasing your weight and insulin resistance. When you consume a diet that is laden with refined carbohydrates or sugar, and when you nibble away on sweets, you have excessive blood sugar fluctuations that in effect force your glands and organs to make your PCOS problems w Continue reading >>

Pcos And Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Pcos And Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the chances are good that you have experienced low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) at one point or another. It's a common symptom of PCOS wherein the body's inability to regulate insulin results in sudden dips in blood sugar levels, affecting both the health and quality of life of women living with the disease. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia While a glucose meter can tell you exactly how low your blood sugar is, most people can recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia the moment they happen. The most common include: Headaches Anxiety or nervousness Sweating, chills, or clamminess Irritability Dizziness Nausea Confusion Fatigue Hunger Causes of Hypoglycemia All in all, the body does a pretty good job of regulating glucose levels in the blood. When the levels rise in response to stress, the body will type release insulin to transport the glucose from the blood to cells where they are stored for future use. But it doesn't always work perfectly, and there are things that cause glucose to drop suddenly and dramatically. Among them: Exercising far more than usual Waiting too long between meals or skipping meals Not eating enough food or carbohydrates Drinking excessive alcohol Taking medications that can lower blood sugar, including beta-blockers, MAO inhibitors (antidepressants), Bactrim (an antibiotic), and Metformin (used to treat diabetes) It is not unusual for women with PCOS to experience hypoglycemia even if they do not have diabetes. PCOS is associated with an exaggerated insulin response wherein the body releases excessive amounts of insulin when certain foods are eaten. High levels of insulin then push glucose quickly into cells, causing blood sugar levels to plummet. Diagnosis of Hypoglycemia Doctors will regularly check the insulin Continue reading >>

Your Blood Sugar May Be The Key To Your Hormone Imbalance

Your Blood Sugar May Be The Key To Your Hormone Imbalance

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy I remember frommy early medical training that the first question a doctor should ask a patient with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is, Are you trying to get pregnant? If the answer is no, hand them the birth control pill . If the answer is yes, choose between clomid, a fertility drug, and metformin, an insulin sensitizer. No questions related to lifestyle, stress, nutrition, total toxic burden I had29 more patients to get to that day. It turns out that research showsmany lifestyle changescan pull someone out of the metabolic chaos of PCOS, anddecrease herchances of developing co-morbidities such as diabetes , heart disease , hypertension , sleep apnea , anxiety , depression and infertility . RELATED: What You Should Know About Infertilitys Most Common Cause Insulin resistance is one of the root physiological imbalances in most, if not all, PCOS. This is where your pancreas needs to pump out more and more insulin in response to high blood sugar levels. Insulin lowers the blood sugar by storing the glucose in cells. The cells become resistant to the constant insulin and need more to be signaled to lower the blood sugar. When this resistance goes on for a while, you have high insulin and high blood sugar. Incidentally, insulin is a fat-storage hormone, concentrating fat in the belly region. High insulin levels can tell the ovaries to make more testosterone. Thats why some women with PCOS have symptoms of excess androgens, like dark hairs on the face and belly. If you have PCOS, ask your doctor for a fasting insulin and fasting glucose level to be drawn, along with a HgbA1C (an average of blood su Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

A Common Cause of Carbohydrate Cravings, Fatigue, Depression and Obesity Many people with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, overweight, or sugar/starch cravings are suffering from dysglycemia, which is a disruption in blood sugar metabolism caused primarily by diet. Other conditions that can also be linked to this problem include high blood pressure, some types of high cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, adult onset diabetes, and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Blood sugar problems occur on spectrum of disease with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, and cravings at one end, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the middle, and prediabetes and adult-onset diabetes at the other end. ---------|-----------------------|----------------------|---------------------|---------------------|----------------------|---- Hypoglycemia Fatigue Depression Weight gain Insulin resistance Metabolic syndrome Prediabetes Diabetes All of these conditions are caused by the same basic problem, dysglycemia, with where you are on the spectrum indicating the severity of your disease. It is important to point out here that not everyone with fatigue, depression, high cholesterol or high blood pressure has dysglycemia or insulin resistance, but many of them do. Virtually everyone with metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, or adult-onset diabetes, however, does have insulin resistance. Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance occurs when cells which would normally take sugar out of the blood, and hence lower blood sugar, become resistant to the action of insulin. It therefore takes more insulin to keep a person’s blood sugar in check. People with insulin resistance syndrome will consequently have normal blood sugar levels and elevated insulin levels. People with insulin resistance tend Continue reading >>

Risk Of Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

Risk Of Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

Gestational diabetes occurs when women who have never had diabetes before develop an impaired ability to process glucose during pregnancy, resulting in high blood sugar. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) are at greater risk for developing gestational diabetes, or GD. High blood glucose associated with gestational diabetes can lead to complications including a high birth weight, preterm birth , respiratory issues at birth, low blood sugar, and jaundice . It can also cause problems for the mother and child at delivery. Fortunately, a carefully balanced diet with or without medication can help manage blood sugar levels and prevent complications. Women who are older than 25, have had gestational diabetes with prior pregnancies, who are overweight, who have prediabetes, or who have close family members who have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are at greater risk for developing gestational diabetes. Women with PCOS are a part of that group because of the association with insulin resistance and prediabetes. Most women dont experience any symptoms of gestational diabetes, though very rarely, they may notice excessive thirst and urination. While the condition usually resolves after giving birth, a woman with gestational diabetes is more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life. All women are monitored for gestational diabetes with a routine blood sugar screening at 24 to 28 weeks. Since PCOS can result in higher blood sugar due to insulin resistance, women with the condition are often screened for gestational diabetes earlier in the pregnancy. There are two different ways to screen for gestational diabetes the glucose challenge test and glucose tolerance testing. Both methods require that you drink a sugary solution, though the amount differs depending on Continue reading >>

Pcos And Diabetes: What Research Suggests About Their Link | Everyday Health

Pcos And Diabetes: What Research Suggests About Their Link | Everyday Health

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a leading cause of infertility in women, but that's not its only possible effect: Those with PCOS also may be at a greater risk of type 2 diabetes. When she was in her late teens, Michelle Elkins suffered from irregular, painful periods, and she was grappling with excess body hair, particularly around her face, chin, and neck. She was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), an endocrine (or hormonal) condition that affects about 10 million women in the world and is a leading cause of infertility, according to the PCOS Awareness Association . Then, in her early thirties, Elkins received more bad health news: She had type 2 diabetes . During routine blood work, I started noticing that my fasting blood sugar was rising. My dad also has type 2, and for a long time, I was nave and didnt want to admit that I had it, she says. RELATED: What to Know About Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk if a Parent Has the Disease Even without a family history, having PCOS dramatically raises your risk of type 2 diabetes. One study published in October 2017 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found women with PCOS had four times higher odds of developing the disease, and were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at an earlier age than those women without PCOS. Now 40, Elkins says that looking back on her PCOS diagnosis, she was never told that type 2 diabetes was something that should be on her radar. Back when I was diagnosed, the message was, you have this thing called PCOS, but we really dont know what comes from it, she says. Its a sentiment echoed by doctors, too. In the past, PCOS was thought of as a reproductive disorder related to fertility. In the last few years, people are becoming aware that its a metabolic condition, says Fiona McC Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

Gestational Diabetes And Pcos

What is Gestational Diabetes and what does it mean to my unborn baby? Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of female infertility because it causes many types of menstrual irregularities, including the absence of a period.4 If you don’t ovulate or this process is impaired, then pregnancy is unlikely. So treating PCOS symptoms and addressing a condition called Insulin Resistance, which influences PCOS, is very important for women wishing to conceive.4 If a woman does conceive in spite of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome it is not all smooth sailing. Unfortunately, there will be a new series of health issues concerning PCOS and pregnancy.3 Women with PCOS have a higher risk of several pregnancy problems, including gestational diabetes, miscarriage, premature delivery, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and babies with high birth weight.8 It is crucial for women with PCOS to work closely with their obstetrician during pregnancy to minimize the risk of these problems. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes happens when a pregnant woman’s body has an impaired ability to process glucose. This results in high blood glucose levels that can cause serious complications for the woman and her growing baby.9 During pregnancy elevated blood sugar can be passed to the baby through the placenta producing a larger baby with potentially immature lungs. A large baby also means a more dangerous birth for both mother and child. Gestational diabetes affects about seven percent of all pregnancies and usually develops after the 20th week.5 Since gestational diabetes can be the cause of serious complications for both mother and baby, it is crucial to be under an obstetrician’s care, especially if you have PCOS or present with any other risk factors. Since PCOS in itself Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Pcos

Hypoglycemia And Pcos

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. I was recently diagnosed with hypoglycemia and a few weeks later the doctor found the PCOS. I am a little confused about what all of this means can someone help me? My mom had PCOS and back in her day they treated it with a hystaritamy so that at thirty she under went this surgery. I started having cysts that progressively got worse starting at 26 and now at 30 I was having multiple cysts almost all the time and then they would rupture every few months causes me to throw up and then not be able to eat for days. I also have hypothyroid disease so each time this would happen I would actually gain weight. I then started having problems with my blood sugar and when my OB gave me a five hour glucose test after seeing the results he sent me to the endro who diagnosed me with reactive hypoglycemia and put me on a no sugar diet. At the visit he ran some tests including the testrone test and found testrone high and after looking at a sonagram of mine and a CAT scan ruling out several cancers that can cause testrone to be high, he diagnosed the PCOS and put me on metaform. So my questions are: is hypoglycemia usually a side effect of PCOS? Is it at all possible to lose weight with PCOS, hypoglycemia, and hypothyroid disease? Will I never be able to eat sugar again? How will pregnancy work with hypoglycemia? Ok, so no one has posted any answers to my questions but I have been able to answer some of my own questions. So, I thought I would post them in case someone else is asking the same questions. Yes, hypoglycemia can b Continue reading >>

Normal To Have Low Blood Sugar Symptoms With Metformin?

Normal To Have Low Blood Sugar Symptoms With Metformin?

normal to have low blood sugar symptoms with Metformin? If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Did your OB-GYN help or hinder your knowledge about Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)? Take our Survey here ! normal to have low blood sugar symptoms with Metformin? I just started taking Meformin 500mg twice a day with meals on wednesday, and just as it peaks, I get low blood sugar symptoms (3-4 hours after I take it). I get lightheaded, nauseated, and sweaty. It resolves after I eat (although sometimes I have to drink juice to help it quickly resolve or I feel aweful for hours). I was just wondering if others have found this to be true. I also have been feeling like I am in a slight fog--I can't figure out if I am just tired, or maybe slightly depressed or if it is just the effects of the metformin. I read other people have stomach problems which I have had a little of, but I don't know if I just have to adjust to it, or if I should call my RE about the low sugar issues. Did your doctor give you the Met just b/c you have PCOS?? Or did you have to do the 2hr GTT?? I know some doctors give met just b/c of the PCOS...but if you dont have IR then you may be taking it and not really need it. This is why I ask. I did not know they did a 2 hour glucose tolerance test to dx insulin resistance. I know they do it to dx gestational diabeties, but I did not know they routinely did it for any one else. I thought is was odd that he did not do a fasting glucose, insulin, and Hemaglobin A1C. However, I was the one who asked if I nee Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

Blood Sugar Testing For People With Pcos And Chronic Stress

We take blood sugar pretty seriously ‘round these parts, for a host of reasons. Blood sugar instability (dysglycemia) wreaks havoc on our adrenal glands – those tiny endocrine powerhouses whose overproduction of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol can greatly impact thyroid function. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can trigger a cascade of hard-to-manage symptoms, including mood imbalance, energy dips, head fog, and insatiable cravings. And while our adrenals are pumping stress hormones, the hypothalamus gets a little distracted from its job spurring thyroid hormone production vis a vis disruption to the hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid (HPT) axis. Next thing you know, your thyroid has become sluggish. So, yes, we spend a lot of time coaching our thyroid and adrenal clients on how to maintain stable blood sugar and avoid hypoglycemic episodes. (Jill calls these hair-raising episodes “the pit.”) Although low blood sugar can cause short-term concerns for many of us, consistently high blood sugar poses serious, long-term risks. Anyone with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or people who are in prolonged periods of extreme stress, are at risk for elevated blood sugar, and would be well-served to monitor trends in blood sugar to nip any potential increases in the bud. PCOS is a condition characterized by hormonal imbalance. One such hormone impacted in women with PCOS is insulin, produced by the pancreas to allow our cells to access the energy available from our food. In essence, insulin regulates the amount of sugar in our blood. Women with PCOS are at a particular risk for insulin resistance (meaning that the body’s cells no longer respond as effectively to insulin) and type 2 diabetes. Those conditions, in turn, lead to higher risks of other complicati Continue reading >>

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