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Pasta And Blood Sugar

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

5 Foods That Increase Blood Sugar Levels

Common sense dictates that diabetics should avoid cakes, pies and cookies. Since their systems already have difficulty breaking down glucose, eating sugary treats can quickly spike a diabetic's blood sugar level. And that's not good. High levels of glucose, over time, can result in long-term health issues. In reality, most diabetics can have a small pastry from time to time - if they adjust other portions of their food intake and adjust their medicine accordingly, especially if they are insulin-dependent. While the impact of sugary goodies on a diabetic seems apparent, there are other not-so-obvious foods that can also cause blood sugar spikes. hey also contain simple carbohydrates - which the body breaks down into sugar and sends along to the blood stream. A properly functioning pancreas produces insulin that turns the sugar molecule into energy. A diabetic's pancreas, though, either cannot produce enough insulin or none at all. That's why careful consumption of "hidden sugar" foods is an important part of managing a diabetic's care. Here are 5 "hidden sugar" foods that surprisingly contribute to blood sugar issues: White Rice Who doesn't love a favorite chicken dish served over a bed of rice? One cup of cooked white rice, though, packs as many carbohydrates as three slices of white bread. Rice also has very little fiber, which helps keep blood sugar levels constant. White Bread Peanut butter and jelly between two slices of white bread might be a meal of choice for many children. But the white bread can be more of a problem than the jelly for a diabetic. White bread is made from refined flour - which the body turns quickly into sugar and causes rapid blood sugar fluctuations. Pasta and Marinara Sauce Diabetics must be careful when the dinner group votes "Italian". Ther Continue reading >>

Whole-wheat Pasta & Glycemic Index

Whole-wheat Pasta & Glycemic Index

Written by Christina Nagle; Updated July 20, 2017 Whole-wheat pasta is a low glycemic index food. Carbohydrate Value of Pasta vs. Whole-Grain Pasta The glycemic index is a measure of how much carbohydrate-containing foods or drinks raise blood sugar levels after eating. Foods and beverages with high GI scores are more quickly digested by the body and cause a sharper spike in blood sugar. Those with low GI scores are digested more slowly and raise blood sugar more gradually. Whole-grain foods such as whole-wheat pasta typically have a lower GI ranking than their more processed counterparts. The GI value is determined by how much a particular food or drink raises blood sugar compared to pure glucose. A high GI score is between 70 and 100, medium is between 56 and 69 and low is 55 or under. Only foods and beverages that contain carbohydrates are given a GI value, since carbohydrates have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Studies have shown that low-GI foods are more satiating than high-GI foods. High-GI foods cause a sharper rise and fall in blood glucose -- the sharp drop signals the body that it is time to eat again. Several factors affect a food or drinks GI. Refined grains that have had the bran and the germ removed have a higher GI than whole grains. Ripe fruits and vegetables are higher in sugar than unripe ones and have a higher GI. Foods that are higher in fiber have less digestible carbohydrates and thus a lower GI. The more fat or acid a food contains, the slower it is digested and the lower its GI. Coarsely ground grain is more slowly digested than finely ground grain and has a lower GI. Some studies have associated high-GI foods with an increased risk for heart disease, diabetes, overweight, age-related macular degeneration, infertility and colorectal cancer. Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Can I Eat Pasta If I Have Diabetes

Having diabetes does NOT mean that if you like or love pasta, you will now have to give it up…nope, it does not. It DOES however mean that you should be choosier about the types of pasta you eat, your portion size and maybe how often you include pasta with your meals. We all need carbohydrates in our diet—it provides our bodies with the necessary fuel to keep us going. The critical question is how much and what kind of carbohydrate. Whole Grain Pasta versus Regular Pasta Whole grain pasta in general has lower calories, more fiber and more nutrients than regular pasta made from refined flour. Refining strips fiber, vitamins and minerals from the grain (usually wheat grain) and in return, you get a softer, smoother texture. 1 serving (1 cup) of whole grain pasta contains 174 calories, 37 grams of carbohydrate and 6.3 grams of fiber as compared to a serving of regular pasta with 221 calories, 43 grams of carbohydrate and 3 grams of fiber. That extra fiber in whole grain pasta (with fewer carbohydrates) can slow down the absorption of sugars from your digestive tract and this can mean that your blood sugars will not spike as much as they might with regular pasta. In addition, whole wheat pasta has a glycemic load of 15 while regular pasta has a glycemic load of 23. In both whole wheat pasta and regular pasta, about 80% of the calories are derived from carbohydrates.[1], [2] Put all this together and serving for serving, whole grain pasta gives you more fiber, more nutrients, fewer calories and fewer carbohydrates than regular pasta, making whole grain pasta a better choice, overall. Also, you can always opt for non-wheat based pasta such as corn, quinoa or rice-based pastas. I advise you to read the following diet tips for diabetes: Portion Size All the numbers given ab Continue reading >>

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

Pasta: To Eat, Or Not To Eat?

One of my favorite foods is pasta. I think I could eat pasta every day and never tire of it. And when I’ve had a rough day, nothing comforts me as much as a plate of pasta with butter (or trans-fat-free margarine), Parmesan cheese, and freshly ground black pepper. Yet pasta is much maligned in the diabetes world. I’ve noticed that people who have diabetes become very passionate when discussing this food. There’s the camp that is indignant at the idea that pasta even exists — it spikes up blood glucose, causes weight gain, and may just be responsible for global warming (OK, that’s an exaggeration). There’s another camp who still eats pasta, but feels horribly guilty for doing so, and will swear with their right hand in the air that, “I really only ate a half a cup” (and 99% of the time, it’s just not the case). I don’t mean to trivialize the subject. Pasta can be tricky to fit into one’s diabetes eating plan. But not because it sends blood glucose levels to the moon. My belief (and you’re welcome to disagree with me) is that most of us struggle with portion control. It’s been engrained in us that pasta is a main dish: that it should be piled high on the plate and smothered in red sauce, with a crusty, buttery slice of garlic bread resting on the side. This is where the problems come in. Here’s what I mean. Take a look at the calories and carbs in the pasta meal that I just mentioned: 3 cups of pasta: 135 grams of carbohydrate, 663 calories 1 cup of sauce: 30 grams of carbohydrate, 185 calories 1 slice of garlic bread: 24 grams of carbohydrate, 170 calories Total: 189 grams of carbohydrate, 1,018 calories If you dine in an Italian restaurant and manage to clean your plate, you’ll consume even more carbohydrate and calories. When you look at p Continue reading >>

Which Types Of Pasta Raise Blood Sugar?

Which Types Of Pasta Raise Blood Sugar?

Tortellini in cream sauce.Photo Credit: Eising/Photodisc/Getty Images Sara Tomm began writing in 1971. She holds certificates in the medical, physiological and nutritional principles and treatment modalities for eating disorders. As a weight-management consultant, Tomm authored educational materials relating to the medical, psychological, environmental and social aspects of eating disorders, nutrition and physical fitness. She studied at Columbia University, Henry George School of Social Science, Farmingdale State College and Suffolk Community College. Carbohydrates contain sugars, starches and cellulose. During the digestive process, the rate at which carbs are broken down and absorbed into the bloodstream depends on their molecular structure whether they are simple or complex carbs. The foods eaten with carbohydrates also play a role in the rate of absorption into the bloodstream. Because they are carbohydrates, certain types of pasta can elevate blood sugar. If you are watching your weight or have a health problem, such as diabetes, it is important for you to know your pastas. Your body keeps a check on blood sugar levels by releasing the hormone insulin into the bloodstream whenever blood sugar levels become elevated. Pasta made from semolina, farina and refined durum wheat flour are digested more quickly than pasta made from whole-grain durum wheat. The speed at which pasta and other simple carbs made from refined flour products are digested influences your blood sugar levels and contributes to those sugar highs and lows that deplete energy and trigger hunger. Eating these products over an extended period can contribute to obesity and damage health. The way you cook pasta can contribute to elevated blood sugar. The longer you cook it, the softer pasta becomes. The Continue reading >>

Pasta And Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways To Eat Pasta

Pasta And Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways To Eat Pasta

Pasta and Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways to Eat Pasta Pasta and Diabetes: 5 Healthy Ways to Eat Pasta Here's how to put some pasta on your plate without sending your blood sugars soaring! Written by Marina Chaparro, RD, CDE, MPH For me, little compares to a meal of freshly-made fettuccine with a sprinkle of olive oil. Fortunately, it's possible to eat spaghetti without sending blood sugar soaring. Pasta! Mangia bene pasta! For meand countless othersthere's nothing like eating freshly-made fettuccine with a sprinkle of olive oil, parmesan cheese and a nice glass of wine. Yet, for many people with diabetes, pasta is on the top 10 list of worst foods to eat. For years, the health message given to people with diabetes was to avoid pasta at all cost. Reasons included causing blood glucose spikes, weight gain, spiking excessive insulin and simply being a white food with too many carbs. Yes, pasta can be problematic for some people with diabetes. But, the problem with pasta is not the grain itself, but rather the quantities Americans are accustomed to eating. The appropriate serving size is not what you get at Olive Garden (equivalent to 3 cups of pasta), but rather the size of your fist or about 1 cup. Contrary to what most people think, pasta is a l ow glycemic food . One cup of fettuccine, which yields 45 grams of carbohydrates, has a glycemic index of 32 and a glycemic load of 15. Compare that to the same portion of Jasmine rice and the glycemic index more than triples,111 glycemic index and 45 glycemic load. Does pasta make you gain weight? Not according to the research. A recent Italian study published in the Journal Nutrition & Diabetes surveyed over 14,000Italians and found that those who ate more pasta had, in fact, a lower body mass index and smaller waist circumference, Continue reading >>

Pasta And The Gylcemic Index - Meals - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Pasta And The Gylcemic Index - Meals - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Pasta is sometimes referred to as a low-glycemic-index (GI) or medium-GI food because the GI of many pastas are in the 40s or 50s, much lower than the GI of white bread or rice cakes. By way of comparison, the GI of sucrose (table sugar) is about 60, the GI of white bread is about 70, and the GI of white rice is about 65. The glycemic index is measured by giving volunteers enough of the test food to contain 50 g of carbohydrate and then measuring the area under the blood glucose (BG) curve for 2 hours. The higher the GI, the faster the food will raise your blood sugar. Many of us prefer foods with GIs much lower than that of pasta, but others are able to tolerate reasonable amounts of such foods, so having an accurate GI is important for them. I myself have given up pasta altogether, as it raises my BG too much, and when I feel a need for some type of noodle in a dish, I eat either tofu shirataki or bean thread noodle made from pea starch. The former contains almost zero digestible carbohydrate (its mostly soluble fiber), and the latter, although it does contain a lot of carbohydrate, raises my BG levels much less than other pasta. Theres one aspect of regular pasta that is not commonly known, or commonly accepted, and that is the fact that pasta will often give you two peaks, one at the usual 1 or 2 hours (depending on how much fat you eat with the pasta) and the other much later, at 4 or 5 hours. What this means is that you could measure your postprandial (PP) BG level at the usual time, 1 or 2 hours after eating some pasta, and find that the number was within your target ranges. Youd conclude that pasta was an OK food for you. But then, 4 or 5 hours later, your BG would go up and you wouldnt know it. Furthermore, because the official GI measurements are stopped afte Continue reading >>

Reader’s Digest Says Pasta Doesn’t Spike Your Blood Sugar

Reader’s Digest Says Pasta Doesn’t Spike Your Blood Sugar

At the start of every new year, lists abound detailing what we should and should not eat. These how-to eat-healthy headlines beckon as the one thing standing between us and perfection. Thankfully the lists target everyone, not solely those of us with diabetes, but I’d had enough when I spied a Reader’s Digest article touting the 50 Best Healthy-Eating Tips of All Time. The phrase “of all time” is probably what threw me over the edge. The problem with making big sweeping statements about what we should eat is that we are all radically different. Regardless of the commonalities we might share––taking insulin, watching our weight, avoiding gluten––we are of different genetic makeup, weight, age and gender. Tufts University recently came out with a study that showed that low glycemic and high glycemic foods react differently in different people. I always assumed that if two people ate a ripe banana they would have the same basic reaction: their blood sugar would rise quickly. But, in “repeated tests involving 63 healthy adults, researchers found that individual blood sugar responses after consuming a fixed amount of white bread could range across all three glycemic index categories (low, medium, or high).” A similar study out of Israel that tracked the blood sugars of 800 people after eating certain good and bad meals, came to similar conclusions. “The huge differences that we found in the rise of blood sugar levels among different people who consumed identical meals highlights why personalized eating choices are more likely to help people stay healthy than universal dietary advice,” said Professor Eran Segal of the Weizmann Institute of Science, which conducted the study. Interesting right? Even what we think is definitive isn’t, and even the stud Continue reading >>

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar

1 / 8 7 Foods That Spike Blood Sugar If you have type 2 diabetes, you know about the importance of making healthy mealtime choices. But just as important is staying away from the wrong foods — those that can spike your blood sugar. That's because simple carbohydrates, like white bread and sugary soda, are broken down by the body into sugar, which then enters the bloodstream. Even if you don't have diabetes, these foods can lead to insulin resistance, which means your body's cells don't respond normally to the insulin produced by the pancreas. Here are seven foods you should avoid for better blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Pasta From Increasing Blood Sugar Levels

How To Prevent Pasta From Increasing Blood Sugar Levels

How to Prevent Pasta from Increasing Blood Sugar Levels A lot of people avoid pasta to prevent them from fattening or increasing their blood sugar levels. The truth is, pasta contains carbohydrates which after being broken down in the guts are absorbed like simple sugars. This, in turn, causes spikes in their blood sugar. As a result, the body produces more insulin to bring back their blood sugar levels down to normal. However, a quick increase in blood sugar levels, followed by a rapid fall can make them feel hungry soon after having their meal. And, its not just pasta that leads to this, but other carb-rich foods as well. They include white rice , potatoes , white bread, as well as sugary sweets and cakes. Thats why dieticians recommend eating high-fiber foods since they cause a much more gradual increase and drop in blood glucose levels. But, what if we can turn our carb-rich pasta into food that acts like fiber to the body? That would be great, enjoying our pasta without feeling guilty or afraid of spiking our blood sugar. How to Prevent Pasta from Increasing Blood Glucose Levels Scientists explain we can turn the structure of our pasta into a resistant starch which wont raise our blood sugar as much as carbohydrates. We can do this if we let our cooked pasta cool before eating. The resistant starch in cold pasta is resistant to the gut enzymes which break down carbs and release glucose, which, in turn, leads to blood glucose spikes. So, as the lead author, Dr. Denise Robertson, explains, cooking our pasta and letting it cool before eating will make our body see it as a fiber. This, in turn, will cause a smaller glucose peak and lower calorie absorption. So, by letting our pasta cool before eating well kill two birds with one stone well prevent a significant blood Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

When people eat a food containing carbohydrates, the digestive system breaks down the digestible ones into sugar, which enters the blood. As blood sugar levels rise, the pancreas produces insulin, a hormone that prompts cells to absorb blood sugar for energy or storage. As cells absorb blood sugar, levels in the bloodstream begin to fall. When this happens, the pancreas start making glucagon, a hormone that signals the liver to start releasing stored sugar. This interplay of insulin and glucagon ensure that cells throughout the body, and especially in the brain, have a steady supply of blood sugar. Carbohydrate metabolism is important in the development of type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops gradually over a number of years, beginning when muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. This condition, known as insulin resistance, causes blood sugar and insulin levels to stay high long after eating. Over time, the heavy demands made on the insulin-making cells wears them out, and insulin production eventually stops. Glycemic index In the past, carbohydrates were commonly classified as being either “simple” or “complex,” and described as follows: Simple carbohydrates: These carbohydrates are composed of sugars (such as fructose and glucose) which have simple chemical structures composed of only one sugar (monosaccharides) or two sugars (disaccharides). Simple carbohydrates are easily and quickly utilized for energy by the body because of their simple chemical structure, often leading to a faster rise in blood sugar and insulin secretion from the pancreas – which can have negative health effects. Complex carbohydrates: These carbohydrates have mo Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Eat Pasta Here S How | Diabetic Connect

Diabetics Can Eat Pasta Here S How | Diabetic Connect

What if a diabetes diagnosis didnt have to mean throwing out all the pasta in your pantry? Well, it doesnt. Many with diabetes choose to eliminate pasta from their diet, because all those carbs can do some serious damage to your blood sugar. But if youre smart about which pasta you select, what you add to it, and how you cook it, you may still be able to include pasta dishes in your diabetes diet. According to research from Dr. Denise Robertson at the University of Surrey, cooking, cooling, and reheating your pasta before eating it can change the way your body reacts to this carb-heavy food. Like most carbohydrates, pasta is a starch. When starches are broken down in your gut, they get absorbed as simple sugars, which makes blood sugars soar. When you cook pasta and then cool it down before eating, some of these starches are transformed into a resistant starch through a process called retrogradation. Resistant starches are absorbed into your bloodstream in a different way, acting like soluble fiber that is resistant to digestion and passes through the digestive tract without transforming into a simple sugar. In a small clinical trial , Dr. Chris van Tulleken tested this and found that those who ate pasta that had been cooked, cooled, and reheated had a significantly lower rise in blood sugar than those who ate fresh, hot pasta. Everybodys diabetes is different, so its hard to say how your body will react to this pasta cooking method. We asked members in a discussion question whether anyone had tried it out. While some seemed skeptical and others found that even resistant starches caused problems for them, there were a couple who said they try to include resistant starches in their regular diet. If you want to try out the cook, cool, and reheat pasta method , make some Continue reading >>

The Right Way To Eat Pasta To Avoid Blood Sugar Spikes

The Right Way To Eat Pasta To Avoid Blood Sugar Spikes

A lot of people with diabetes are fearful of pasta just because of its infamously high carbohydrate content. They think eating pasta will spike their blood glucose levels to the moon and increase their body weight. The truth is, pasta does have high carbohydrate content that affects blood glucose levels, but you dont have to give it up if you have diabetes. Instead, you should pay attention to how much and what kind of pasta you should eat. If youre able to control your portion size and choose the right type of pasta, you can continue eating this Italian meal as part of your diabetes diet . Before telling you how to achieve that, lets explain how carbohydrates affect your blood sugar levels. Excessive carb intake can lead to high blood sugar or hyperglycemia. If you have high blood sugar levels for a longer time, it could lead to health complications associated with kidneys, eyes, heart, and nerves. So, to prevent blood sugar spikes , people with diabetes should limit their carb-rich food intake. However, they should not eliminate these foods completely, as carbohydrates are essential for the human body. Regular pasta made of refined flour strips vitamins, minerals, and fiber from the grain, resulting in a softer and smoother texture. On the other hand, whole grain pasta is higher in fiber and other nutrients but lower in calories. One cup (1 serving) of regular pasta contains 43g of carbs, 3 g of fiber, and 221 calories. In contrasts, the same amount of whole grain pasta has 37g of carbs, 6.3g of fiber, and 174 calories. The higher levels of fiber and lower levels of carbs in whole-grain pasta allow slower absorption of sugars in the digestive tract. In other words, whole-grain pasta wont raise your blood sugar as much as the regular. Whats more, the glycemic load of Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

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