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Painless Glucose Meter

Abbotts New Freestyle Flash: Instant, Painless Glucose Monitoring Without Finger Sticks

Abbotts New Freestyle Flash: Instant, Painless Glucose Monitoring Without Finger Sticks

Abbotts New Freestyle Flash: Instant, Painless Glucose Monitoring Without Finger Sticks A new glucose monitoring system has recently received U.S. FDA approval, which removes the need for routine finger sticks and is still reliably accurate enough to use for insulin dosing. The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring (FGM) System by Abbott Diabetes Care is designed to help adults over 18 years old with diabetes to achieve tighter control over their blood sugar levels. Jeffrey Brewer, CEO of Bigfoot Biomedical, who has partnered with Abbott to bring this technology to the U.S., said, FreeStyle Libre is a dramatic advance the first product that truly makes life with diabetes easier and addresses the most important problem plaguing people with diabetes: real-world, day-to-day, moment-to-moment usability. The FreeStyle Libre launched in Europe in October of 2014 and just received U.S. FDA approval on September 28, 2017. Abbott expects that it will be available for purchase in the States by the end of the year. Similar to continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), the FreeStyle Libre consists of a sensor embedded just under the skin that tests your glucose levels every minute. Other CGMs take readings about every five minutes and send those automatically to a readout device. The FreeStyle Libre stores up to eight hours of readings. You get your current glucose level and a graph showing the last eight hours when you scan the sensor using a mobile, handheld reader device. The reader has a touchscreen for ease of use. It can take a reading through clothing as thick as four centimeters, so checking your glucose levels is now much more convenient and discreet. The reader allows you to also add tags to each scan, such as carbs, insulin, exercise, and customizable options, explained Dia Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Prickless Glucose Monitoring System

Fda Approves Prickless Glucose Monitoring System

FDA Approves Prickless Glucose Monitoring System By Mark Rubinshtein, Ph.D. January 23, 2018 The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced approval of Abbotts FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitoring system for certain diabetes patients. The glucose monitoring tool will allow patients to monitor their glucose levels the without painful and inconvenient finger pricks of traditional glucose monitoring. According to an Abbott press release , the FreeStyle Libre system will allow patients to self-apply the sensor (which is about the size of two stacked quarters) to the back of the upper arm and capture real-time glucose readings with painless scans of a small hand-held reader over the scanner. This is in contrast to traditional blood glucose monitoring, which may require some patients to finger stick up to 12 times per day. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , over 29 million Americans have diabetes. The FreeStyle Libre system, which became available by prescription from most retail pharmacies in the U.S. by the end of 2017, should enable patients to better manage their disease. Healthline reports that the product has been available for several to patients in other areas of the world. Dr. Maria Tulpan of Lenox Hill Hospital in New York, NY commented : What we see with the FreeStyle Libre system is patients gaining a better understanding of the impact of food, exercise and specific medications on their glucose levels due to availability of the data, which is important in the day-to-day management of diabetes and for behavioral changes towards improved diabetes control. Abbott states that the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System is based on proprietary technology and lists over 50 U.S. Patents issued to Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc., th Continue reading >>

Mit's New Glucose Meter Checks Blood Sugar Levels With Painless Infrared Light

Mit's New Glucose Meter Checks Blood Sugar Levels With Painless Infrared Light

Medical device makers have been trying to come up with a better way for diabetics to measure their blood glucose levels for decades, but while a handful of promising methods have enjoyed measured success, the finger-pricking, blood-drawing glucose meter is still the most common tool for everyday use. But a new development in an old research pursuit at MIT may finally provide diabetics with a painless means of checking their sugar, by simply shining a light on their skin. Researchers at MIT's Spectroscopy Lab have been working for more than a decade on a method of using Raman spectroscopy to measure glucose levels. That approach involves shining near-infrared light on the patient's arm or finger and using the ensuing vibrations put off by the chemical bonds in various molecules in the skin to measure the amount of glucose present. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done The method works well, but the IR light can only penetrate about half a millimeter below the skin. That means glucose readings are actually measuring the amount of sugar in the interstitial fluid surrounding skin cells rather than the bloodstream. To overcome this problem, the team developed an algorithm that relates the two different gl Continue reading >>

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

New Device For Diabetes Eliminates The Need For Painful Finger Pricking

Source:Supplied AUSTRALIAN adults with diabetes now have the option of using a new glucose monitoring device, which eliminates the need for regular finger pricking. The system, which has been available in Europe for several years, involves a small sensor the size of a 20 cent coin worn on the upper arm for 14 days. Many diabetics have to draw blood and test their blood glucose levels up to 12 times a day. Instead of doing that, they can now scan the sensor and get a reading in less than a second. The Abbotts FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System also displays an eight-hour history and a trend arrow showing the direction the glucose is heading. The device will make life easier for people living with diabetes who use insulin, whether type 1 or type 2, said Diabetes Australia spokeswoman Renza Scibilia. Source:Supplied “Finger pricking is painful, inconvenient and intrusive, which is often why people don’t check their levels as often as they ideally should,” she told news.com.au. “It’s very different from just wearing a device on your arm and scanning it.” The disposable, water-resistant sensor needs to be replaced every 14 days and costs $95, while the reader is the same price. The Freestyle Libre can be purchased online via the official website. Ashley Ng, 26, from Melbourne, has been testing the device for two weeks and is a big fan. “I didn’t realise how much a burden finger-pricking was until I stopped,” Ms Ng told news.com.au. “Normally I’d prick myself 6-10 times a day. It’s something that I’ve always lived with and gotten used to, and now I don’t have to do it. She said she felt no pain when inserting the sensor into her arm. “The first couple of days I was like ‘Is this for real?’ I was feeling really great. My fingers f Continue reading >>

New No Finger-prick Glucose Monitor Approved By Fda For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetics

New No Finger-prick Glucose Monitor Approved By Fda For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetics

Most people live a life full of expectations, tasks, day to day activities and functions needed to meet our ambitions, dreams and financial goals. These activities and tasks require a lot of energy to do them efficiently and correctly. Every part of our body needs the energy to function effectively. This energy comes from glucose, which is gotten from the breakdown of foods we eat every day. Now there is a new no finger-prick glucose monitor approved by FDA for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Glucose is vital for the body to grow well and efficiently function. Glucose can be derived from processed foods such as carbohydrates, and from glycogenolysis by the liver when the body is low on glucose. The liver commences a process called glycogenolysis to supply the body with glucose. When there is too much glucose in the body, it is reduced by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) over an extended period. The excessive glucose can be due to reduced insulin or the cells of the body not responding to this insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for controlling the glucose level of the body. This insulin hormone is produced by an organ called the pancreas. Types of Diabetes Diabetes type 1: This is the kind of diabetes that occurs as a result of reduced insulin. It is also termed insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(IDDM) because the etiology is due to reduced insulin production by the pancreas. It is common in younger people and called juvenile diabetes. The reason for the reduced production of insulin by the pancreas in unknown. When the insulin production is reducing, the decreasing glucose function of the body is impaired leading to hyperglycemia. Diabetes type 2: in this kind of diabetes, the i Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Painless Way For Diabetes Patients To Measure Blood Glucose

Painless Way For Diabetes Patients To Measure Blood Glucose

Painless way for diabetes patients to measure Blood Glucose Abbott Diabetes Care recently released FreeStyle Libre Flash , a glucose monitoring system that lets patients collect blood sugar readings by attaching a small wireless sensor on their arm, which then communicates with a mobile device that records and tracks blood glucose; theres no need for finger pricking . Patients perform a 1 second scan by placing the device close to the wearable sensor to obtain their current glucose reading, a trend arrow that tells them in which direction their glucose levels are going, as well as an 8 hour glucose history. (The glucose reading device should be held within 1 to 4 cm of the sensor.) The sensor is only 35 mm by 5 mm and can be worn under ones clothing. It can remain on the patients skin for up to 2 weeks and is water resistant. According to Abbott, the monitoring system measures interstitial fluid glucose levels and is intended for adults 18 years of age and older. DiaTribe, a non-profit organization that offers education and support to patients with diabetes and prediabetes, says the FreeStyle Libre received a CE mark in September 2014 to market the device in Europe. Its not yet approved in the United States. FreeStyle Libre is accurate enough from which to dose insulin, with performance similar to Dexcoms G4 Platinum CGM and it gave an excellent picture of glucose trends through real-time and on-device reports, according to DiaTribe. The non-profit group tested the new system by having one of its staff members use it to monitor his blood glucose levels over time. He found that on average it varied from readings on a traditional blood glucose monitor by only 12%; it varied by 13% when compared to the Dexcom G4 system. Abbott recently completed a trial to satisfy US regu Continue reading >>

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

We are developing a new non-invasive glucose monitor that will help you take control of your life. (Caution: GlucoWise is still under development and not available for public testing. If you are interested please use the "Get involved" signup form on this page. Due to the overwhelming demand we are unable to respond to individual emails - we are focused on getting the device to the market quickly). Glucowise™ is a non-invasive, 100% pain-free device that makes traditional blood sampling a thing of the past. Our unique sensor technology will allow you to monitor blood glucose levels without the need to pierce your skin. Simple yet highly reliable, Glucowise™ will exceed industry standards for self-monitoring blood glucose accuracy. You will be able to sample as often as you like and wherever you like, ensuring you avoid sudden hypoglycemic events. Our App and Smart Cloud technology delivers personalised advice and alerts, helping you to fully manage your condition. Intelligent analytics will use your current and historical data to calculate and forecast immediate trends in your blood glucose levels, allowing you to adjust your food or medication intake according to your activities or how you are feeling. Glucowise™ will offer unlimited testing without the need for costly consumables, so you can test as often as you like without having to worry about the cost or pain. The compact design will offer you high levels of privacy. It will take no more than 10 seconds to provide a simple, fast and highly discrete testing experience – anytime, anywhere. The data can then sent wirelessly and securely to your smartphone or tablet. Take control There are many situations whereby conventional testing is challenging. Often people with diabetes will unnecessarily expose themselv Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Blood Sugar Testing Goes Wireless, Painless For Diabetes Patients

Open this photo in gallery: Now that is cool: Testing your sugar without needles and without blood droplets. In Europe, the medical company Abbott has just released its FreeStyle Libre system, which may usher in a revolution in diabetes care. And both doctors and patients can't wait. Prabahar Gopalakrishnan, 26, is a type 1 diabetic who has taken daily insulin injections since the age of seven. "I've probably pricked my fingers almost 15,000 times so far," he tells me. When I tell him about the new system, he finds it hard to believe. "You mean I might never have to poke myself again?" Chandroutie Permaul, a 65-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes, also finds routine self-testing problematic. "My flesh gets so tender," she complains. "And when I wash the dishes, it just burns and burns." These hassles may soon be a thing of the past. The Libre system uses an advanced, coin-size sensor that is worn on the arm for two weeks at a time. According to the instructions, a tiny "filament is inserted just under the skin and held in place with a small adhesive pad." It comes with a hand-held scanner which looks like a largish smartphone. Swiping the scanner over the sensor instantly measures your sugar, displaying the result in "less than one second." Speaking at the European launch in Vienna, Jared Watkin, a technology vice-president at Abbott, also demonstrated that you can even scan the sensor "through your clothes." You don't even need to calibrate the system with a test drop of blood. That's remarkable – and unheard of in the diabetes world. "Patients would fly with this," says Dr. Susan Burlacoff, a Toronto family physician. She believes there will be great utility of this bloodless system in her own practice. "It's painless, convenient, without needles and [patients] woul Continue reading >>

Israeli Company Develops Painless Glucose Monitor

Israeli Company Develops Painless Glucose Monitor

Israeli company develops painless glucose monitor The new device, which is expected to reach the US market during the second half of this year, is called GlucoTrack, and unlike other non-invasive measurement devices, it combines three independent technologies that are operated simultaneously to provide an accurate and reliable on-the-spot reading of glucose levels in the blood. The technologies include ultrasound, conductivity, and heat capacity. In the US, a massive 20.8 million people have diabetes (7% of the population), of which 6 million are unaware that they have the condition, according to statistics from the American Diabetes Association. These figures are also rising dramatically. The association points out that a further 41 million Americans suffer from pre-diabetes, or Impaired Glucose Tolerance. GlucoTrack, which was developed by Ashkelon start-up, Integrity Applications, consists of two parts, the main monitoring system which includes a portable display and is about the same size and weight as a cellphone, and a small sensor that contains the sensors and calibration electronics, and clips onto the earlobe like a clip-on earring. This can be adjusted to fit just as easily. Users input their data into the machine, and can then after a short calibration start using the battery-operated device. The ear clip is attached painlessly to the ear, and users can painlessly measure blood glucose levels as many times a day as they want. The combined result is displayed on a digital screen. If blood glucose levels rise too high or too low, measurements predetermined by the user, an automatic visual and audible alarm goes off. We made it as simple as possible to operate because many diabetic patients are elderly, says founder and CEO, 51-year-old Avner Gal. They just tur Continue reading >>

Pkvitality

Pkvitality

painless blood-free glucose monitoring K’Watch Glucose is the first wearable tracker that measures your glucose effortlessly, painlessly and in just a matter of seconds. K’Watch allows diabetics to self-monitor their glucose levels without the need for cumbersome and painful blood-based tests. K’Watch Glucose requires no calibration, just a simple press gesture on the watch to display the glucose level. How does it work ? K’Watch Glucose is equipped with K’apsul®, utilizing a revolutionary biosensor which, when in contact with the skin, tests glucose levels without the need of blood samples. Quite imperceptible and totally painless, K’apsul can take unlimited measurements within a 30-day period with results being displayed on the K’Watch screen as well as synced to its dedicated app. No bulky material, K’Watch Glucose can be discreetly worn all day long and in all conditions. Monitoring your blood glucose in every social setting becomes possible, whether you are at work or even when exercising – when glucose level are prone to spike. K’Watch Glucose can also track steps taken, distance traveled and calories burnt. K’Watch Glucose makes a diabetic’s life easier. In order to better monitor their health, users can connect K’Watch Glucose with its dedicated iOS and Android app to show a complete data history over time and share those results with a relative or a professional. K’Watch can also send alerts to remind users to check their glucose level. Diabetes is characterized by chronic hyperglycaemia, which is an excess of sugar in the blood. With 415M people affected (1 in 11 worldwide), diabetes is widespread and is progressing rapidly. It is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, lower limb amputation, and 1.5 mill Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Controlling your blood sugar, or blood glucose, level is key to managing diabetes. Accurate test results help people with diabetes adjust their diet, exercise routine, and treatment plan—which might help prevent complications and reduce the risk of seizures, kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. Anyone with diabetes can benefit from testing. Blood glucose monitoring can be important for those taking insulin or other diabetes medications, women with gestational diabetes (diagnosed during pregnancy), and those having difficulty controlling their diabetes. Today's blood glucose meters are smaller, faster, more accurate than older models, and come with more features. We tested dozens of models priced between $10 and $75. Use our guide to help you find the best monitor for your needs. All glucose monitors work in a similar way, but some have features and options that might better suit your specific needs. Talk with your doctor or diabetes educator about which monitor matches monitoring requirements lifestyle, and budget. Cost Don't just look at the retail price of the meters alone. What makes blood glucose monitoring expensive is the test strips, which you might use many times a day. At $18 to $184 per 100 test strips, the cost can add up to about $265 to $2,685 a year for people who test four times a day. Replacement lancets are another expense to consider. Insurance Medicare covers some diabetes-related supplies, and private insurance might cover some of the cost. See if there are certain brands of meters and test strips that insurance covers. Find out how many test strips, if any, are covered per month. Your strip coverage may depend, for example, on whether you use insulin. Automatic Coding Blood glucose meters need to be calibrated to each batch of test strips. Continue reading >>

The Quest For A Painless Way To Check Blood Sugar

The Quest For A Painless Way To Check Blood Sugar

MORE Eight-year-old Christiana Kirchner is a snacker, who likes nothing more than eating five or six mini meals throughout the day. But these days, she sometimes forgoes her favorite treats so she can avoid the necessary blood tests that precede them. Christiana was diagnosed with Type 1 juvenile diabetes last March, and now the Palatine, Ill., third-grader has to prick her finger to test her blood sugar before she eats. The pricks provide vital information about her blood glucose levels, but are painful and leave her tiny fingers calloused and throbbing. "There are times where she's like, 'Forget it, I don't want to eat,'" said her mother, Sue Kirchner. She and her husband sometimes prick their own fingers to just show their daughter that they feel her pain. Sue said she wishes there was a way to measure her daughter's blood glucose levels without having to collect blood. Currently, there are no noninvasive blood glucose monitors approved by the Food and Drug Administration. But if there was one, many people would stand to benefit: Nearly 26 million people in the United States — 8.6 percent of the population — have diabetes, according to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and that number continues to rise. The area is ripe for innovation, as nationwide spending on managing the disease balloons past $174 billion. A number of companies and universities have thrown their hat into the ring to attempt to devise an affordable, noninvasive way to effectively measure blood glucose levels. If they succeed, such a device would revolutionize the way people manage their diabetes, and would be a financial boon for its developers, said Mark A. Arnold, an expert in noninvasive technology and chair of the Department of Chemistry at the University Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

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