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Okra To Lower Blood Sugar

Okra And Type 2 Diabetes

Okra And Type 2 Diabetes

Okra is an interesting vegetable because, depending on where you live, you may eat it every single day or you may have never heard of it in your life! This green pod vegetable is widely consumed in the southern United States, particularly in Creole cuisine, and some people even refer to it as “gumbo pods” or “lady’s fingers.” It’s originally from Egypt, where it’s thought to have been growing since about the 12th century. Today, okra is eaten around the world and prepared in so many different ways. As its green hue suggests, okra is a fantastic vegetable for any diabetic diet. It can be eaten in abundance by anyone wishing to stay healthy and feel great! Okra Nutrition Facts Okra is a super low calorie, low carbohydrate food. 1 cup contains just 33 calories and 7 grams carbs. It’s high in fiber – 1 cup will give you 3 grams fiber, which means it’ll keep you full! Okra is also a fantastic source of calcium, potassium, folic acid, and vitamins A, C, B6, and K. Okra has a low glycemic index of 32. Health Benefits of Okra Vitamin C: This antioxidant lowers blood pressure, boosts the immune system, and prevents respiratory problems. Vitamin B6: Bolsters the immune system and helps regulate blood glucose levels. Calcium: Can help regulate glucose metabolism. Fiber: Promotes satiety and healthy gut bacteria and helps prevent blood sugar spikes. Folic acid: Lowers cardiovascular risk and may prevent birth defects. Research on Okra and Type 2 Diabetes There isn't a great deal of research but the science available confirms that okra is beneficial for your health. Fascinating studies have shown that okra consumption can reduce blood sugar level and lower lipid levels by preventing the absorption of cholesterol. Okra extract has been found to have the same effec Continue reading >>

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

Benefits Of Okra For Diabetes

What Is Okra? Okra, also known as “lady’s fingers” and “gumbo,” is a green flowering plant. Okra belongs to the same plant family as hibiscus and cotton. The term “okra” most commonly refers to the edible seedpods of the plant. Okra has long been favored as a food for the health-conscious. It contains potassium, vitamin B, vitamin C, folic acid, and calcium. It’s low in calories and has a high dietary fiber content. Recently, a new benefit of including okra in your diet is being considered. Okra has been suggested to help manage blood sugar in cases of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Incidences of diabetes diagnoses are only increasing, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The verdict is out on whether okra can be used successfully as a direct diabetes treatment. However, the okra plant does have many proven health benefits. Read on to see if okra could be a viable part of your diabetes treatment plan. Studies on Okra and Diabetes Medical research on okra for diabetes management is still in early stages. We do know that according to one study, okra water improved the blood sugar levels of pregnant rats that had gestational diabetes. Roasted okra seeds, which have long been used in Turkey to treat diabetes, have also been studied and proven to have a positive effect on lowering blood sugar. Okra Benefit #1: Dietary Fiber Okra is high in fiber. Eight medium-sized pods are estimated to contain 3 grams of fiber. This bulk fiber quality has several benefits. It helps digestion, cuts hunger cravings, and keeps those who eat it fuller for longer. Foods that are high in fiber content are an important part of dietary treatment options for diabetes. Increased dietary fiber intake has been shown to promote better glycemic control a Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Okra For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Benefits Of Okra For People With Diabetes?

Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes contributes to the development of deadly conditions like cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Consuming a healthy diet can help those who have type 1 and 2 diabetes control their blood sugar, and help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are a number of diabetes-related benefits of adding okra to your healthy eating plan. Video of the Day The glycemix index (GI) is a measurement of how quickly carbohydrates in foods turns to sugar in your blood. Regularly consuming low GI foods like okra can help even out roller coaster blood sugar levels and aid in weight control. Okra has a GI below 20, which is considered a "low GI" food. Almost half of all cases of kidney disease are the result of diabetes. Keeping your blood sugar within a healthy range, treating high blood pressure and maintaining a normal body weight can reduce your risk of kidney disease. Additionally, regularly consuming okra can keep kidney disease at bay, according to study results published in the October 2005 "Jilin Medical Journal." In this study of diabetics, those who ate okra daily reduced clinical signs of kidney damage more than those that simply ate a diabetic diet. Nearly 50 percent of the fiber found in okra is in the form of soluble fiber. This type of fiber slows digestion, delaying and reducing the impact of carbohydrate-rich foods on blood sugar levels. Eating at least 25 g of fiber per day can help reduce high blood sugar levels. Soluble fiber may also keep your appetite under control, making weight loss easier. People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart disease than those that don't. Diabetics who regularly consume vegetables in general, including okra, reduce their heart disease Continue reading >>

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

How To Make Okra Water To Support Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Okra is a comfort food in some parts of the world – often served battered and fried, it nevertheless has numerous health benefits when prepared properly. Also known as lady fingers, bhindi, or bamia, okra is a pod vegetable, filled with seeds and is often added to soups like gumbo for extra texture and flavor. What many people may not know about this often underrated veggie is that there is a well established connection between okra and diabetes treatment. Although all studies in this area to date have been done in animal models the evidence is hard to deny. Managing Blood Sugar Levels One study, published in the Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences, found that diabetic rats given a solution of water with okra soaked in it had lower blood sugar levels than the control group of rats, who were given a cellulose gum instead. The study concluded that the seeds and peel of the okra plant have anti-diabetic properties: “The present study, for the first time, confirms that A. Exculentus peel and seed possess blood glucose normalization and lipid profiles lowering action in diabetic condition.”(1) Preparing Okra Water For Diabetes Treatment Although there is, so far, only anecdotal evidence of okra water being used to treat diabetes in humans, there’s no reason why you can’t give it a try yourself. Some people claim that okra water can help stave off the development of type 2 diabetes, and help individuals maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Preparing okra water is an easy step by step process: Wash 4 or 5 medium-sized okra pods. Clip both ends off the pods, then split the pods in half or pierce each side of the pods with a knife. Place the pods in a large mason jar, then cover them with water. Soak the pods overnight, at least eight hours (up to 24 hours). In Continue reading >>

What Is Okra?

What Is Okra?

Tweet Okra is fast gaining a reputation as a so-called 'superfood' for people with or at risk of diabetes or cancer. Commonly referred to as ladyfingers, or by its biological names Abelmoschus esculentus and Hibiscus esculentus, okra is known to have a positive effect on blood sugar control, among many other health benefits. Okra is a tall-growing vegetable that traces its origin from ancient Ethiopia (Abyssinia) through to Eastern Mediterranean, India, the Americas and the Caribbean. Parts of the plant (immature okra pods) are widely used vegetables in tropical countries and are typically used for making soups, stews or as a fried/boiled vegetable. These tender pods are very low in calories, providing just 30 calories per 100 g, and contain no saturated fats or cholesterol. They are also rich in nutrients, completely non-toxic, and have no adverse side effects. How can it help treat diabetes? Evidence of okra having anti-diabetic properties has increased in recent years, with multiple Vitro (laboratory) and Vivo (animal) studies confirming okra as a potent blood glucose-lowering (or anti-diabetic) food. In one study, published 2011 in the Journal of Pharmacy & BioAllied Sciences, researchers in India found that diabetic mice fed dried and ground okra peels and seeds experienced a reduction in their blood glucose levels, while others showed a gradual decrease in blood glucose following regular feeding of okra extract for about ten days. Outside of scientific research, many people with diabetes have reported decreasing blood sugar levels after soaking cut-up okra pieces in water overnight and then drinking the juice in the morning, while in Turkey roasted okra seeds have been used as a traditional diabetes medicine for generations. What's behind this effect? The superior Continue reading >>

How To Use Okra For Treating Diabetes

How To Use Okra For Treating Diabetes

By Jenny Hills, Medical Writer and Researcher Food & Nutrition , Health Okra is considered a comfort food by all who love it. Although okra or Abelmoschus esculentus (sometimes referred to as lady fingers,bamia or bhindi) is often served fried and battered, it is quite the healthy food and boasts many health benefits when prepared without a beer-battering and deep-frying. I discussed the 10 health benefits of okra in the past and briefly talked about research linking okra consumption to improvements with diabetes. I also included okra as part of my list of 14 foods that can control type 2 diabetes . Okra packs a potassium punch, has many vitamins and minerals and is nearly calorie-free. Now, lets take an in-depth look at the okra-diabetes connection, and learn more about how preparing okra in a specific way can help fight existing diabetes and stave off diabetes in those who have been diagnosed as pre-diabetic (also be aware of the 13 Early Warning Signs of Diabetes You Shouldnt Ignore ). Please note that all solid research to date has been conducted on animals, and although rat and rabbit studies may translate well to human applications, the human evidence for okra as an anti-diabetic treatment are limited to anecdotes at this time. Okra as a Natural Cure for Diabetes the Research Several research studies have shown that okra can help treat diabetes. One animal study published in the Journal of Pharmacy & BioAllied Sciences and performed by researchers from India used rats in which diabetes had been induced. This study found that the seeds and peel of okra have anti-diabetic properties which led the rats to stabilized blood glucose levelsthe prime concern in all diabetic animals, including humans. In this study the okra pods were soaked in water and one group of rats Continue reading >>

8 Great Benefits Of Okra

8 Great Benefits Of Okra

Okra is a tradition on many dinner tables, but did you know its packed with great health benefits, too? Its true: studies show nutrient-rich okra can make you look and feel great. Okra is high in Vitamin A, Vitamin C and a very special type of fiber that can really boost your health. New research is revealing more and more about this traditional dinner side. Okra can lower your blood sugar, regulate your digestive system and support a healthy pregnancy, scientists say. Here are 8 great benefits of okra. Diabetes isnt a recent phenomenon. In fact, it has a long history. Written reports from Greece and Turkey listing symptoms date back as far as two thousand years ago. The word diabetes is Greek for a siphon, as sufferers were seen to pass urine like a siphon (in other words, excessively). The seeds of the okra plant have been used for centuries in Turkish folk medicine to treat diabetes. And interestingly, current science is backing this age-old wisdom. Studies show that okra seeds can lower blood glucose , a component in treating diabetes and in controlling pre-diabetes as well. Diabetes develops when the bodys insulin is no longer able to keep up with glucose in the blood. This may be due to the body making too little insulin, or to the body beginning to resist insulins efforts. Lowering blood glucose can go a long way toward increasing insulin sensitivity in other words, allowing insulin to do its job. By adding okra to their health regimen, some individuals may be able to keep a full-blown diabetic condition from developing. And, while its important that you follow your doctors instructions, natural methods such as eating okra could help you feel better, experts say. Theres no doubt that diabetes is a serious condition that requires management. But potentially even Continue reading >>

Does Okra Help Reduce Blood Sugar?

Does Okra Help Reduce Blood Sugar?

Okra provides significant amounts of manganese and vitamins C and K, making it a nutritious vegetable choice. Diabetics don't need to worry that okra is going to greatly increase their blood sugar levels. In fact, preliminary research shows that eating more okra may help you lower your blood sugar levels. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked sliced okra has just 3.6 grams of carbohydrates. Nonstarchy vegetables, such as okra, that contain less than 5 grams of carbohydrates are counted as "free" foods for diabetics who are counting carbohydrates -- as long as you eat fewer than three servings per meal. At that amount, they aren't likely to significantly increase your blood sugar levels. Research Results The research on the effects of okra on blood sugar is still in the preliminary stages, but a study published in the "Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences" in 2011 using rats found a potential beneficial effect. Diabetic rats given powdered okra peel and seed had reductions in their blood sugar levels at the end of the 28-day study, compared to rats in the control group that didn't get powdered okra. Another study, published in "ISRN Pharmaceutics" in 2011, found that a solution made from okra helped decrease the absorption of glucose in rats with diabetes. Potential Mechanism Each 1/2-cup serving of sliced, cooked okra has 2 grams of fiber, or 8 percent of the daily value. Of this fiber, about one-fourth consists of soluble fiber, which is the type that slows the emptying of the stomach and the movement of sugars into the bloodstream. Fiber helps improve blood sugar control in diabetes, with a high-fiber diet potentially decreasing after-meal blood sugar levels by as much as 21 percent, according to a review article published in "Nutrition Reviews" in April 2009. Safety Cons Continue reading >>

Simply Adding Okra To Your Diet Helps Lowering Blood Sugar

Simply Adding Okra To Your Diet Helps Lowering Blood Sugar

Okra not only lowers your blood sugar but help reverse diabetes If you are diabetic and searching for natural remedies you might have already heard of okra. If you’re from the south of the United States you probably had it in gumbos and soups. Some people don’t like okra because they produce a slimy juice but this is actually what helps with diabetes. Some people don’t know okra at all because they can’t find it where they live. Even though the medicinal properties of okra have been known for thousands of years in India it is relatively new to the west. Above and beyond medicinal properties okra also has many nutrition benefits: Protein, niacin, riboflavin, phosphorus, zinc, copper, potassium, Vitamins A, B6, C, and K, thiamine, magnesium, folate, calcium, and manganese. For those who don’t like okra because of undesirable slime juice there are several ways to prepare it so the slime is eliminated. Many people fail to appreciate okra because they simply do not know how to use it. The first mistake gardeners make is to let the pods become too old and tough before harvesting. They grow very fast, and in hot weather and become unfit for use in less than a week after the pods are developed but still tender. The pods must be harvested three to five days old. If you select them at the market one trick is to try to break the tips, if they don’t break or just bent its a sign they are not fresh. In some regions, the leaves are also used for human consumption. Okra is not a very easy to find fresh and tender in some parts of the world where they are brought from faraway, but okra can be grown just about anywhere where the summers are hot. Hibiscus esculentus. Okra or lady fingers are the names most often used in the United States. In the Philippines is also okra but w Continue reading >>

Fact Check: Okra Cures Diabetes?

Fact Check: Okra Cures Diabetes?

Rumor claims drinking water in which okra has been soaked overnight will make 'diabetes go away.' Claim: Drinking water in which okra has been soaked overnight will make diabetes go away. TRUE: Okra may have some beneficial effect in helping to regulate blood sugar levels. FALSE: Okra can cure diabetes or eliminate the need for diabetics to take insulin. Examples: [Collected via Facebook, January 2014] Someone posted that soaking okra ends in water over night and drinking the water next day helps cure blood sugar levels in diabetics, is this true. Origins: An item widely circulated via social media in January 2014 (shown above) advocated cutting the ends off a few okra slices, soaking the slices in water overnight, then drinking the water the following morning as a way of making diabetes go away and eliminating the need for There is a bit of truth to this claim in the sense that okra (also known as ladys finger, bendi, and gombo) does possess some anti-diabetic properties, namely that the viscosity of okras carbohydrates helps to slow the uptake of sugar into the blood by reducing the rate at which sugar is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, thereby reducing the glycemic load of glucose in the blood that can disrupt the bodys ability to properly process the sugars (and that in some cases can lead to the onset of diabetes): Soluble fiber, found in porridge oats, okra, strawberries and aubergines among other foods, forms a kind of gel inside the bowels. This slows down the absorption of food from the gut, evening out the peaks in blood glucose that occur after meals. Soluble fiber also draws in bile acids that contribute to raised cholesterol, allowing the body to pass the acids out of the system rather than reabsorbing them into the blood. Soluble fiber therefore Continue reading >>

Extract Of Okra Lowers Blood Glucose And Serum Lipids In High-fat Diet-induced Obese C57bl/6 Mice.

Extract Of Okra Lowers Blood Glucose And Serum Lipids In High-fat Diet-induced Obese C57bl/6 Mice.

J Nutr Biochem. 2014 Jul;25(7):702-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2014.02.010. Epub 2014 Mar 18. Extract of okra lowers blood glucose and serum lipids in high-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice. School of Pharmacy, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China. Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China. School of Pharmacy, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203, China. Electronic address: [email protected] Okra is an important tropical vegetable and source of dietary medicine. Here, we assayed the effects of an ethanol extract of okra (EO) and its major flavonoids isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside on metabolic disorders in high-fat diet-induced obese mouse. We found that treatment with EO, isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside reduced blood glucose and serum insulin levels and improved glucose tolerance in obese mice. Meanwhile, serum triglyceride levels and liver morphology in the mice were significantly ameliorated by EO and isoquercitrin treatment. Total cholesterol levels in isoquercitrin and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside treated mice were also reduced. We also found that EO inhibited the expression of nuclear receptor transcription factor PPAR, which is an important regulator of lipid and glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, we determined that EO and quercetin 3-O-gentiobioside have antioxidant activity in vitro. Our results indicate that okra may serve as a dietary therapy for hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Diabetes; Hyperlipidemia; Insulin resistance; Okra Continue reading >>

How Okra Normalized My Blood Sugar | Philstar.com

How Okra Normalized My Blood Sugar | Philstar.com

WELL-BEING - Mylene Mendoza-Dayrit (The Philippine Star) - May 27, 2014 - 12:00am February 14 this year was extra memorable to me because that was the day I was declared diabetic! My mother is, but I am the only one whos diabetic among my siblings. I am taking medicines, exercising regularly, and dieting and while all of that significantly reduced my blood sugar by 20% in one week, it was a tip from a friend in Arizona which helped bring down my blood sugar to normal. She sent me a link about okra aka ladyfingers or bhindi or gumbo pods (although in my research, it seems it is popular globally as okra) and how it helps diabetics. The online discussions were encouraging. There were lots of testimonials on how simple yet effective the treatment was. So many swear by it and have stuck with the regimen for years. Heres the recipe: Prepare okra water by using two fresh okras soaked overnight. Cut the ends of the two okras and slit them in the middle before placing in a glass of water. Keep overnight in room temperature. You can also cut the okras into four pieces each. You then take the water first thing in the morning on an empty stomach which should be slimy with the okras mucilage. It is disturbing at first try, but the wonderful results encourage you to go on. When I was diagnosed, my fasting blood sugar was 220. After taking medication, it went down to 180. But after a week of okra water (plus my medication), my blood sugar went down to 110 and is now between 86 and 92. I always knew that a combination of exercise, diet, and medication helps diabetics. My doctor proclaimed he would help me be normal in three months so he was extremely surprised when I did it in one month. One of my colleagues, whos at least 10 years younger than me, already takes insulin shots. I have Continue reading >>

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

Is Okra Good For Diabetes?

According to a handful of recent studies, okra may reduce symptoms of diabetes - a group of diseases that includes type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes claimed the lives of 75,578 Americans in 2013, according to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2014, 8.5 percent of adults worldwide had the condition, the World Health Organization (WHO) report. By 2030, diabetes may be the seventh leading cause of death. A number of factors increase a person's risk of developing diabetes, including a family history of the disease. Lifestyle factors also play a role, so doctors routinely recommend diet changes and increased exercise to reduce blood sugar levels. Okra may help reduce blood sugar levels in some people with diabetes. Research into the effects of this seedy vegetable is still in the early stages, but the results are promising. Contents of this article: What is okra? Okra thrives in temperate climates, producing large hibiscus-like flowers that eventually give rise to green seed pods. It is a member of the mallow family, which includes a number of other popular plants, including hibiscus, cocoa, and cotton. Scientifically known as Abelmoschus esculentus, okra may have been grown as long ago as 2000 BCE in Egypt. Okra's flavor is mild, and the entire seed pod can be eaten. This vegetable-like fruit also has a long history in traditional medicine. Kew Royal Botanic Gardens report that in Eastern traditional medicine, okra leaves and fruit were used as pain relievers, moisturizers, and to treat urinary disorders. In Congolese medicine, okra is used to encourage a safe delivery during childbirth. Can okra help with symptoms of diabetes? Diabetes can often be well-managed with increasing a hormone called insulin Continue reading >>

Okra For Diabetes

Okra For Diabetes

Okra is a vegetable used in cooking in warm climates. Recently, some websites have posted that it is a “diabetes cure.” What is the science on okra? How can it help you? Okra’s scientific name is Abelmoschus esculentus. It is used as a thickener in stews because of the goopy stuff in its seed pods. That same goop keeps many of us from eating it at all, but it may contain powerful medicine. Like bitter melon, okra has been tested successfully in rodents, but not in humans, and not in America. In researching this article, I found articles from Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Taiwan, and Japan, and the studies are definitely worth looking at. A 2005 study from Taiwan published in the journal Planta Medica tested okra in rats with diabetes. Researchers purified a chemical called myricetin from the okra. They gave the rats the solution by IV. The myricetin greatly increased rats’ muscles’ ability to absorb glucose, which in turn reduced their blood sugar levels. A study from Bangladesh was published in the online journal ISRN Pharmaceutics, based in Cairo, Egypt. The study showed that purified okra given to rats orally through a feeding tube slowed glucose getting out of the intestines, which sharply reduced after-meal glucose level spikes. In a study from India published in the Journal of Pharmacy & Bioallied Sciences, in 2011 researchers fed diabetic rats powdered okra seed and peel extracts. After up to 28 days of consuming the extracts, the rats showed a significant reduction in blood sugar levels. Their triglyceride (lipid) levels also returned to near normal. In just these three studies, we see evidence that okra may help insulin function or even act as a substitute for insulin. It also slows glucose from getting into the blood in the first place, like drugs suc Continue reading >>

Health Benefits Of Okra (lady’s Fingers)

Health Benefits Of Okra (lady’s Fingers)

Okra is also known as “lady’s finger” in some parts of Asia. And various other names in other parts of the world. The plant is cultivated in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions around the world. Okra is an edible pea pod and can be eaten raw. It is an acquired raw taste and you may like the crunchiness. You can lightly blanch, steam or give it a quick stir-fry to reduce the “green” taste. Use when it’s tender, as it gets very fibrous when it’s older. In the okra pods, the white soft seeds (edible) are arranged in 5 to 10 vertical columns, giving it the angled appearance on the outside. Nutritional Benefits Of Okra Okra is very low in calories and dense with nutrients. It is high in fiber, vitamin A, C, and folate content. It is also a good source of the B vitamins, vitamin K, calcium, potassium, iron, zinc, and traces of magnesium and manganese. Okra is one of those few vegetables which have the highest content of phytonutrients and antioxidants such as beta-carotene, xanthin and lutein. Health Benefits Of Okra Okra is one of the best medicinal vegetable although it is not everyone’s favorite. You may like to try it if you knew about its immense health benefits: Anemia: Helps red blood cells production and prevent anemia. Anti-Cancer: The high antioxidants in okra helps protect the immune system against harmful free radicals and prevent mutation of cells. Asthma: The high antioxidants and vitamin C content make okra useful for reducing asthmatic attacks. Bone Strength: Folate in okra builds strong bones and density, preventing osteoporosis. Cholesterol: The soluble fiber helps to lower serum cholesterol, thus also reducing atherosclerosis and the risk of heart diseases. Constipation: The rich fiber and mucilaginous (slimy) content in okra po Continue reading >>

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