diabetestalk.net

Nursing Smart Goals For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan And Diagnosis For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan And Diagnosis For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan and Diagnosis for Diabetes This nursing care plan is for patients who have diabetes. Diabetes is where the body is unable to control blood sugar levels due to either the body not being able to produce enough insulin or because the body is resistant to insulin. A normal blood sugar level ranges between 70-150. Anything below 70 is considered hypoglycemia and anything above 150 is considered hyperglycemia. In this care plan we will be talking about hyperglycemia. In patients who havea high blood sugar the classic three Ps will present such as polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. Uncontrolled diabetes is mostly common caused by patient knowledge deficient of notknowing how to manage their diabetes properly.Many patients lack the knowledge about diet regimes, how to give insulin properly, sliding scale dosages, common signs and symptoms of high blood sugar, dosing insulin when sick,and how insulin works. It is the nurses responsibility to educate the patient about diabetes. Some doctors will educate the patient but many times this falls to the nurse. Remember that uncontrolled diabetes can lead to blindness, peripheral vascular disease, and heart problems. Below is a nursing care plan with diagnosis and nursing interventions/goals for patients with diabetes. What are nursing care plans? How do you develop a nursing care plan? What nursing care plan book do you recommend helping you develop a nursing care plan? This care plan is listed to give an example of how a Nurse (LPN or RN) may plan to treat a patient with those conditions. Important Disclosure: Please keep in mind that these care plans are listed for Example/Educational purposes only, and some of these treatments may change over time. Do not treat a patient based on this care plan. Care Plans are Continue reading >>

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

S.m.a.r.t. Weight Loss With Type 2 Diabetes

Make losing weight with diabetes easier by setting S.M.A.R.T. goals. S.M.A.R.T. stands for Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound. When your goals are S.M.A.R.T., it will be simpler to stay on track with your diet. To help manage your diabetes, you need to spread carbs out more evenly throughout the day. So, for example, a S.M.A.R.T. goal is “I will eat a breakfast containing 45 grams of carbohydrates every day for the next 2 weeks.” Here’s the S.M.A.R.T. breakdown: Specific: targeted to breakfast Measurable: 45 grams, every day Attainable: Breakfasts with about 45 grams of carbs are very doable. A few options: 1 cup cooked oatmeal (32 grams), 1/2 medium banana (13 grams), a hard-boiled egg, black coffee 2 scrambled eggs, 1 small whole wheat pita (15 grams), 1 orange (18 grams), 1 cup 1% milk (14 grams) 3 rye crispbreads (24 grams), 1/2 cup nonfat cottage cheese (5 grams), 1 cup of blackberries (15 grams) Relevant: Spreading carbs out is relevant because it helps you curb hunger, so you don’t overeat. To hit 45 grams, you have to plan to eat protein and fat in addition to carbs at a meal. A piece of toast with an egg, for instance, will keep you feeling full longer than two slices of toast with jam. When you’re more satisfied, you’re likely to eat less overall. Time-bound: This goal will be your focus for 2 weeks. At the end of that time, you can decide if you want to do it again or set a different goal. Setting S.M.A.R.T. goals helps keep big projects, like losing weight or managing blood sugar, from being overwhelming. Your steps for success are clearly spelled out so that you know when you’ve met the goal. The biggest payoff comes from turning short-term goals into long-lasting, healthy habits. Continue reading >>

Effective Care Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Dyslipidemia: A Nurse'sperspective.

Effective Care Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes And Dyslipidemia: A Nurse'sperspective.

1. Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2005 Jun;68 Suppl 2:S23-7. Epub 2005 Apr 14. Effective care of patients with type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia: a nurse'sperspective. (1)University College London NHS Foundation Trust Hospitals, Middlesex Hospital, London W1N 8AA, UK. [email protected] By 2030, it is predicted that type 2 diabetes will affect 4.4% of the world'spopulation, an estimated 366 million individuals. Diabetic dyslipidemia is amodifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is a major cause ofpremature mortality in type 2 diabetes. The management of diabetic dyslipidemiarequires a multidisciplinary approach and the role of the nurse within thehealthcare team is pivotal. Their broad remit positions nurses not only at theforefront of care, where they are well placed to recognize the clinical signs of the condition, but also as patient advisor, counselor, educator, monitor andmotivator during the continuum of care. Poor concordance is a common problem for patients receiving multiple medications. Educating the patient about theimportance of lifestyle change, and ensuring that lifestyle and pharmacologicalinterventions are sustained are important components of effective care. Choosing therapies that enable patients to reach their treatment goals with a simpledosage regimen may also help to maximize patient concordance. Nurses must remain up to date with treatment options and management guidelines in order that theycan communicate relevant information to patients, empowering them to makeinformed decisions about their health. Specific, measurable, achievable, relevantand time-specific (SMART) goals should be set for each patient. This form ofindividualized care, in which the patient becomes fully engaged with theirtreatment plan and personal goals appear at Continue reading >>

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Teaching Plan For Diabetes Mellitus

Please read about my new book This is a powerful antioxidant therapy which has natural ingredients to combat effects of oxidative stress to promote health and wellness. Please visit our other website by Louise Diehl, RN, MSN, ND, CCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C Nurse Practitioner - Owner Doctor of Naturopathy Lehigh Valley Wellness Center Before you begin your teaching plan be sure to define the characteristics of the clinical site and patient population. The teaching plan should be customized to this population. This is a sample teaching plan that you can use and customize to your needs. You may want to design a pre-test and post-test to give your patients would are attending the teaching program. Based on statistics from the Centers for Disease Control website, 17.0 million people in the United States, approximately 6.2% of the population, have diabetes. Of this 17 million people, 11.1 million are diagnosed and 5.9 million are undiagnosed. In the different age groups, about 151,000 people less than 20 years of age have diabetes, approximately 0.19% of people in this age group. In the 20 and older age group 16.9 million and 8.6% of people have diabetes. The 65 and older age group has 7.0 million and 20.1% of all people with diabetes (www.cdc.gov/diabetes). The Identified Learning Need Patients with Diabetes have very comprehensive learning needs. The learning needs are focused on managing their glucose levels and preventing complications of diabetes. Learning needs for managing diabetes are complex and include: monitoring blood glucose levels, menu/food planning, exercise, medications, skin care, management of co-existing disease processes, knowledge of medications, knowledge of the disease process and how to manage hypo/hyperglycemic episodes. Many patients are diagnosed with dia Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plans: Examples, Nanda Plans, Plans For Diabetes, Characteristics

Nursing Care Plans: Examples, Nanda Plans, Plans For Diabetes, Characteristics

Nursing care plans are an important part of providing quality patient care. The care plans record the outcome of the discussion between the patient and the health-care professional and list any actions agreed. Care plans also help to define the nurses role in the patients treatment and specific goals for an individual patient. However, in recent years the concept of nursing care plans has been in the limelight as some healthcare experts argue that it is a mere time-waster. Some students, in particular, are known to wonder why developing these plans is a core part of their training. However, while embracing this culture may seem like a hectic task, there are solid studies that show that it indeed has lots of benefits. In addition, there are many tangible reasons why planning can improve the quality of healthcare. Let us have a look at what it takes to create nursing care plans and their benefits. Nursing Care Plans Nursing Interventions The purpose of creating professional nursing care plans is to identify problems of a patient and find solutions to the problems. This is usually done basically in five main steps including assessment, diagnosis, planning, intervention, and evaluation. The first step involves comprehensive and accurate assessment. This is usually accompanied by a routine assessment of the patients health status demand. For a comprehensive assessment, you should ask yourself questions such as: Why is the patient seeking medical care? What is the overall look of the patient? Also referred to as a diagnostic statement, nursing diagnosis involves professional judgment concerning the patients response to either potential or actual health problems or needs. It, therefore, acknowledges the potential or actual health condition and labels it. Some questions nurses Continue reading >>

In Goal Setting, Let Your Patient Lead

In Goal Setting, Let Your Patient Lead

Goal setting is a skill that is taught and learned, and it is an essential component of diabetes education. Author Geoffry F. Abert once said, The most important thing about goals is having one. Most people know what they should do to live a healthier life. When asked, the person on the street will say that he or she should lose weight, exercise more, eat less, or quit smoking. Although these are important steps to take toward a healthy lifestyle, many people not just people with diabetes find it difficult to take them. For people with diabetes, it is critical that these steps are taken, but changing ones behavior and habits has emotional, psychological, physical and environmental barriers. So, in the limited amount of time that we have to spend in each encounter with patients, how do we support their efforts to change their behavior and achieve positive long-term health outcomes? The key to behavior change is goal setting. The AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors provide a patient-friendly language to use when discussing healthy behaviors and diabetes self-care, but it is not the end of the story. Once patients understand that healthy eating, being active, monitoring, taking medication, problem solving, healthy coping, and reducing risks are key behaviors that are essential to successful diabetes self-management, they then move on to set goals and make a plan to achieve those goals. Goal setting is a skill that is taught and learned, and it is an essential component of diabetes education. It is not enough for patients to understand that they need to lose weight or exercise more. They must learn to set goals that are SMART: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely. By setting achievable goals that can be accomplished in small steps, patients are encouraged to keep m Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Grab Free Cheat Sheet Quick! Is this aPTT Count Dangerous? Hesitant? Never Feel Anxious About Lab Values Again... Diabetes Mellitus is when blood glucose (sugar in the blood) is unable to move into the cells and help in the making of ATPAKA energy. The body makes insulin to assist with this process. Insulin is a hormone that allows the sugar in the blood to move across the cell wall so the body can use to to produce ATP. There are two types of diabetes. Type I and Type II. Type I is an autoimmune disorder where the cells attack the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. Thus the body is producing very little or no insulin leaving the sugar in the blood and the cells starve. Type II is when the cells dont respond to the insulin trying to get sugar into them, called insulin resistance. Thus the sugar stays in the blood and the cells starve. The cause for Type I diabetes is unknown, but hypothesized to be potentially genetic or triggered by a virus. The cause for Type II diabetes is caused by a storm of events culminating such as weight gain, lack of activity, genetics, and stress levels. Blood sugar control with minimal side effects. Diabetes Mellitus (Type I and Type II) Nursing Care Plan Blood sugar monitoring: Normal range 70-180 mg/dL *patient may have a different target blood sugar level, make sure to know what each patients target is. The physician will make a target blood glucose level. Teach the patient that they need to monitor their blood glucose.They need to call their primary care physician if they have blood glucose levels higher than their target for multiple days or if they have 2 readings of greater than 300 mg/dL. Teach the patient how to use their glucometer and record their results. Insulin administration -Rapid Acting: Humalog Novolog -Fast/short Ac Continue reading >>

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Nursing Care Plan For Diabetes

Diabetes is really prevalent. Just recall all the patients you saw today and theres probably a handful of them who are diabetic. According to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health PromotionDivision of Diabetes Translation, up to 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes. Because of how prevalent it is, nurses need to be highly knowledgeable and skilled when it comes to educating and caring for their patients. That includes preparing the right nursing care plan for diabetes. Diabetes ordiabetes mellitusis a metabolic disease where blood glucose levels are abnormally high. Symptoms of high blood glucose levels include: In general, there are three types of diabetes and each one varies in terms of treatment and management. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent and juvenile-onset diabetes. This type of diabetes often begins early in childhood. Its an autoimmune disorder where the bodys immune system attacks its own pancreas, inhibiting its capacity to produce insulin. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the 95% of diabetes cases in the US. Onset is usually late in adulthood. It happens when the pancreas is unable to produce adequate insulin to meet the bodys needs or when the bodys cells become resistant to it. Type 2 diabetes can be managed with lifestyle and diet changes as well as intake of oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Gestational diabetes is characterized by pregnancy-induced insulin resistance. It affects roughly 2% to 10% of pregnancies. Diabetic patients need complex nursing care. Here are some of the most important NCPs for diabetes: 1. Deficient knowledge regarding disease process, treatment, and individual care needs verbal statements of concerns or misconceptions improper or inadequate follow-through of instructions de Continue reading >>

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Management Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Adults

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes, making it a medical emergency. Nurses need to know how to identify and manage it and how to maintain electrolyte balance Continue reading >>

Care Plan- Smart (specific, Measureable, Accurate/achievable, Realistic, Timeframe

Care Plan- Smart (specific, Measureable, Accurate/achievable, Realistic, Timeframe

care plan- smart (specific, measureable, accurate/achievable, realistic, timeframe hi , i am a late bloomer, need to do a care plan using SMART including three strategies per nursing diagnosis. Here goes...55 year male self-employed, home renovations. married, five children, with two children from previous marriage with no contact. client not a sporty person coaches 10yr old son soccer team on weekend. hobbies: likes to go fishing when can. Weight 90kg. Height 180cm. thinks he as carried his weight well. Diabetic (niddm) for 2yrs.BSL 16mmol when last checked with GP.Gave up smoking 5 yrs ago. Father died from heart attack age 50yrs. Doesn't understand about the tablet thing for his diabetes, Gp keen to address this issue with him. has asthma mild, well controlled, with preventers only. Wife has concerns for client eg. weight being an issue. The Question is to Contribute to planning care for client in a community setting . one nursing diagnosis relating to client's management of his physical conditiion . one nursing diagnosis relating to client's psychological needs . one nursing diagnosis relating to client's nutritional needs . one nursing diagnosis relating to diagnosis of asthma I really hope you can help me? HELP ME! HELP ME! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Melvin, a 32-year- old,always complains of his increasing need for water. He also feels an increasing need to urinate almost every now and then,and always feels hungry. There is tingling on his extremities and numbness. His once clear vision is now experiencing cloudiness. He already feels tired just a few hours after waking up even though he does not have any job and only stays at home. The wound on his right knee has been there weeks but no improvement is seen. 11 Nursing Management The major sources of the glucose that circulates in the blood are through the absorption of ingested food in the gastrointestinal tract and formation of glucose by the liver from food substances. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases that occurs with increased levels of glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus most often results in defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or even both. The classification system of diabetes mellitus is unique because research findings suggest many differences among individuals within each category, and patients can even move from one category to another, except for patients with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes has major classifications that include type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and diabetes mellitus associated with other conditions. The two types of diabetes mellitus are differentiated based on their causative factors, clinical course, and management. Diabetes Mellitus has different courses of pathophysiology because of it has several types. Insulin is secreted by beta cells in the pancreas and it is an anabolic hormone. When we consume food, insulin moves glucose from blood to muscle, liver, and fat cells as insulin level increases. The functions of insulin include the transport and metabolism of glucose for energy, sti Continue reading >>

Moving From Disease-centered To Patient Goalsdirected Care For Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditionspatient Value-based Care

Moving From Disease-centered To Patient Goalsdirected Care For Patients With Multiple Chronic Conditionspatient Value-based Care

Decision making in cardiology concentrates on disease-specific outcomes following practice guidelines for specific conditions. Quality metrics implemented for value-based purchasing and public reporting also largely focus on individual diseases. Disease-centered approaches are appropriate when individuals have a single predominant disease and everyone with the disease desires the same outcome, such as prolonged survival or stroke prevention. 1 This disease-centered framework is ill-suited, however, for persons with multiple chronic conditions, including most older adults with cardiovascular conditions and the majority of adult health care users of all ages. 2 Disease-centered decision making for this population results in treatment burden when patients must adhere to multiple guidelines and harm when guideline recommendations conflict. 3 Furthermore, disease-centered recommendations may not address what matters most to these patients who vary in their health priorities. 4 To consider an alternative to disease-centered decision making that better aligns care with what matters most to patients and reduces treatment burden, it is helpful to think of health care decisions as value propositions in which value = health outcome / cost. From the population perspective, health care value is defined as survival or disease benefit (output) per dollar spent (input). From patients perspective, however, the personal health outcomes that they hope to achieve are more appropriate outputs. 4 The appropriate inputs may include financial costs, but often more relevant are costs in terms of the time, discomfort, harms, and workload required to achieve their health outcomes. 3 When defined as what patients are willing and able to do for their health, these broader costs inform care prefere Continue reading >>

7 Long-term Goals Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Make

7 Long-term Goals Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Make

Some short-term type 2 diabetes goals are universal, such as eating a healthy diet and exercising more. But diabetes impacts many areas of your health and your lifestyle over the long term, too. It’s important to consider long-term goals as you move forward with your diabetes management plan. Long-term goals for people with diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your immediate goal should be to get and/or keep your blood sugar levels under control through diet, exercise, and, if needed, medications. Once you’ve accomplished that, it’s time to think about long-term goals to help you stay as healthy as possible and prevent diabetes complications. 1. Manage your cholesterol Your body needs cholesterol to perform many functions, and your liver makes all it needs. People with diabetes tend to have higher “bad” cholesterol (LDL) and triglyceride levels and lower “good” cholesterol (HDL). Eating a diet high in saturated and trans fats can increase your body’s production of bad cholesterol. High blood sugar levels and increased intake of simple sugars can increase triglyceride levels, as can chronically high alcohol intake. Smoking can decrease HDL levels. If you’ve never had your cholesterol levels checked, ask your doctor to order a lipid profile. If you know your levels are high, talk to your doctor about taking a cholesterol-lowering statin. Set a long-term goal to lower your levels by eating a heart-healthy diet and exercising regularly. Once your numbers are stable, have them checked at least once a year. 2. Stop smoking Smoking is bad for everyone, but even more so for people with diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, smoking can increase your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. It also makes it more difficult to control Continue reading >>

Goals & Objectives | Department Of Medicine

Goals & Objectives | Department Of Medicine

At the end of the Primary Care Ambulatory Medicine Clerkship, the fourth-year medical student should have a well-developed foundation of skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to provide for patients in office settings. Goal: You will develop and refine the basic clinical skills required to provide effective and efficient primary care. History and physical examination: obtain a patient's history and physical exam in a logical, organized and thorough manner while adapting to the urgency of the medical situation and the time available. Diagnostic decision making: formulate a differential diagnosis based on the key findings from the history and physical examination. Therapeutic decision making: understand risks, benefits, and compliance issues in choosing a treatment. Procedures: be able to perform such procedures as throat cultures, PAP smears, gram stains, wet mounts, and EKGs. 2. Comprehensive Care of Primary Care Patients Goal: You will recognize the spectrum of problems that occur in primary care and will understand how to provide, continuous comprehensive care to patients and their families. assessment of undifferentiated presentation, separating those problems that are serious and require immediate evaluation and consultations from those that do not. exposure to extended care centers including community clinics. Goal: You will develop effective communication skills with patients, families and other health care providers. Identify hidden agendas; recognize psychosocial issues; demonstrate listening skills with probing and clarifying; work with multiproblem patients, angry patients, and somatisizing patients. Make concise, accurate, and well-organized clinical notes and oral presentations and write prescriptions. 4. Application of Health Promotion and Disease Preven Continue reading >>

Setting Goals For Healthy Living

Setting Goals For Healthy Living

The value of a goal lies in the goal itself; and therefore the goal cannot be attained unless it is pursued for its own sake. –Arnold J. Toynbee Staying healthy with diabetes requires efforts on a variety of fronts. These include eating healthfully, being physically active, taking prescribed medicines at the right times in the right doses, scheduling and keeping numerous medical appointments every year, and being aware of not just blood glucose levels, but also blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels, the state of one’s feet, and the sources and level of stress in one’s life. Most people feel more confident about their efforts in some of these areas than in others. So what do you do when the areas you feel less confident about need attending to, such as when your doctor tells you that you need to “tighten up” your control to prevent diabetes complications? For starters, ask your doctor what action or actions on your part would be most beneficial to your health. Then talk about specific goals and the steps you would need to take to reach them. Ask yourself whether those steps sound like actions you are willing and able to take. And keep in mind that you are more likely to be willing to make the effort required to reach a goal that feels important and meaningful to you. If you don’t see the point to what your doctor or another health-care provider is recommending, ask for a more detailed explanation of how a particular change or action will improve your health. Diabetes care areas A tool that can be helpful in determining which actions may be most effective at improving your health with diabetes is the AADE7. This trademarked list of seven self-care behaviors was developed by the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) to help people with diabete Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar