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Normal Blood Sugar Range For Non Diabetic Child

Blood Sugar Levels For Kids And Teens With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Kids And Teens With Diabetes

Well-controlled blood sugars help children with diabetes grow and develop normally. Your doctor will help you figure out what levels are right for your child, since targets change as kids get older. Test your child's blood sugar several times a day so you'll know what you need to do to adjust it. Your goal is simple: Get it into the target range when it isn't. What causes ups and downs? Food Growth and hormones Illness Stress and other emotions No one expects a growing child's blood sugar levels to be normal all the time. And when your child enters puberty, his hormones could cause problems with blood sugars changing wildly. Remember, the numbers on the meter aren't "good" or "bad" -- they're just numbers. They give you information about how to keep your child healthy. Since you or your child might not notice symptoms, testing is the best way to avoid dangerously high and low levels. Help kids learn to manage their diabetes on their own. Encourage good habits. Praise your child when he tests, regardless of the result. Don't let him feel bad or blame him when his levels are out of range. Offer support to get him back on track. Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose In Non Diabetic Child?

High Blood Glucose In Non Diabetic Child?

High blood glucose in non diabetic child? I am very scared, today my daughter was watching me test and was bugging me to test her blood too! So, I changed the lancet and tested her as well OMG 11.8 (we are in Canada but I think that is equal to 200 or more) Immediately pulled out a new strip and tested her again trying not to scare her at the same time11.2. O.K I now these are not lab results but Im scared! We are about to have dinner so I will be testing her again 1.5 to 2 hrs after we eat. Then i guess well do a 8hr fasting reading and pray to God we dont have to take her to get lab work done. Im so worried for her! there are a lot of factors as to this, before you get all crazy with worry. Thats about 200ish, US numbers (handy converter at Wikibetes ). Given the way kids dont wash, put things in their mouths, get candy over their hands, etc. it is possible that its a sugar-on-hands high, rather than a glucose-in-body high. (I know I cant trust a fingertip reading for at least three thorough adult hand-washings after balsamic vinegar gets on my hands.) Please let us know how everything turned out. First I am sorry I did not run across your post last April. Do not worry at this point. We went through a very similar situation here and I can relate with the anguish that you likely feel. I have had t1 diabetes for 26 years and work as a product line rep for Accu-Chek. My wife is a pediatrician. We had a blood sugar reading in the mid 200s (mg/dl) on our 4 year old approx 1.5 years ago. Major panic. Did hand wash and many tests in sucession and they were in the mid to high 200s for approx 2 hours. Ketones were small. I was convinced that it was diabetes - I mean what else could it be? We immediately took her in for labs (insulin antibody, islet antibody, GAD, HBA1c, and o Continue reading >>

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Are Blood Sugar Target Ranges? What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level?

Understanding blood sugar target ranges to better manage your diabetes As a person with diabetes, you may or may not know what your target ranges should be for your blood sugars first thing in the morning, before meals, after meals, or at bedtime. You may or may not understand what blood sugar ranges are for people without diabetes. You may or may not understand how your A1C correlates with your target ranges. How do you get a clear picture of what is going on with your blood sugar, and how it could be affecting your health? In this article, we will look at what recommended blood sugar target ranges are for people without diabetes. We will look at target ranges for different times of the day for people with diabetes. We will look at target ranges for Type 1 versus Type 2 diabetes. Is there a difference? We will also look at what blood sugars should be during pregnancy for those with gestational diabetes. We will look at other factors when determining blood sugar targets, such as: Age Other health conditions How long you’ve had diabetes for Stress Illness Lifestyle habits and activity levels We will see how these factors impact target ranges for your blood sugars when you have diabetes. We will learn that target ranges can be individualized based on the factors above. We will learn how target ranges help to predict the A1C levels. We will see how if you are in your target range, you can be pretty sure that your A1C will also be in target. We will see how you can document your blood sugar patterns in a notebook or in an “app,” and manage your blood sugars to get them in your target ranges. First, let’s look at the units by which blood sugars are measured… How is blood sugar measured? In the United States, blood sugar is measured in milligrams per deciliter (by w Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Glucose In Children

Normal Blood Glucose In Children

Children grow at a rapid rate and for the normal functioning of their brain and organs, their bodies require optimal amount of glucose. Usually, children develop type 1 diabetes due to imbalance of glucose. In childhood, it is difficult at times to recognise the indications of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia). Every child has different needs; ask your doctor to determine the best glucose levels for your child. Right Blood Sugar Range The blood sugar levels of healthy children lie between 70 and 150 mg/dL. It is normal if your child's blood sugar fluctuates in this range. Blood sugar is typically higher after having a meal and lower after intense physical workout. To help keep your child’s blood sugar in the normal range, ensure that you are giving him healthy diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables. Normal blood sugar level according to age groups 0-5 years Normal blood sugar range in babies from newborns to five year olds is 100 to 200mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars should be near 100 mg/dL. Blood sugars after having meals and before going to bed should be somewhat close to 200mg/dl. If it is found below 150mg/dL before bedtime, it must be reported to your child's health care provider. He may recommend a bedtime snack and/or testing before going to bed. 5-11 years For children who are aged between 5-11, normal blood glucose levels are 70 to 150mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars must be close to the lower end of normal sugar level. Blood sugar after meals and before bedtime should be close to the upper end. Glucose level below 120mg/dL during night calls for medical attention. Age 12 and above For children who are 12 or above, normal blood sugar levels are similar to those of adults. Your doctor will recommend a bedtime snack if your child’s blood glucose level is lower than 1 Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Definition: Normal Blood Sugar Ranges

Definition: Normal Blood Sugar Ranges

What are normal blood sugar ranges for non-diabetic people? The term “normal” blood sugars applies to a set of standards recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). From time to time these standards have been adjusted to more adequately diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes. The most recent changes in ADA standards lowered the thresholds for diagnosing diabetes and for diagnosing pre-diabetes. The revised ADA standards mean that more people now fall into the category of having pre-diabetes. This allows for earlier detection of people at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. What are the blood sugar ranges for diagnosing pre-diabetes? Blood sugar levels higher than normal, but lower than diabetic ranges,classify a person as having impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), both of which are used to diagnose pre-diabetes. To check for pre-diabetes, and see how a person reacts to a glucose load, an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may be given to check blood sugar levels 2 hours after being given 75 grams of glucose to drink. The following general guidelines are for normal blood sugar ranges in non-diabetics are from the American Diabetes Association. These guidelines are not intended for “target blood sugar” ranges for people with diabetes. Young children, people newly diagnosed with diabetes, or who are beginning insulin pump therapy will have different target ranges set by their doctor. Fasting Blood Sugar Ranges (per the American Diabetes Association Guidelines) Fasting Glucose Ranges Indication From 70 to 99 mg/dL, or 3.9 to 5.5. mmol/L Normal glucose tolerance, not diabetic From 100 to 125 mg/dL, or 5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L Impaired fasting glucose (IGF), or Pre-diabetes 126 mg/dL or higher, or 7.0 or higher Diabetes Note: Morning Continue reading >>

Can You Have Hypoglycemia Without Having Diabetes?

Can You Have Hypoglycemia Without Having Diabetes?

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when the sugar levels in your blood are too low. Many people think of hypoglycemia as something that only occurs in people with diabetes. However, it can also occur in people who don’t have diabetes. Hypoglycemia is different from hyperglycemia, which occurs when you have too much sugar in your bloodstream. Hypoglycemia can happen in people with diabetes if the body produces too much insulin. Insulin is a hormone that breaks down sugar so that you can use it for energy. You can also get hypoglycemia if you have diabetes and you take too much insulin. If you don’t have diabetes, hypoglycemia can happen if your body can’t stabilize your blood sugar levels. It can also happen after meals if your body produces too much insulin. Hypoglycemia in people who don’t have diabetes is less common than hypoglycemia that occurs in people who have diabetes or related conditions. Here's what you need to know about hypoglycemia that occurs without diabetes. Everyone reacts differently to fluctuations in their blood glucose levels. Some symptoms of hypoglycemia may include: You may have hypoglycemia without having any symptoms. This is known as hypoglycemia unawareness. Hypoglycemia is either reactive or non-reactive. Each type has different causes: Reactive hypoglycemia Reactive hypoglycemia occurs within a few hours after a meal. An overproduction of insulin causes reactive hypoglycemia. Having reactive hypoglycemia may mean that you’re at risk for developing diabetes. Non-reactive hypoglycemia Non-reactive hypoglycemia isn't necessarily related to meals and may be due to an underlying disease. Causes of non-reactive, or fasting, hypoglycemia can include: some medications, like those used in adults and children with kidney failure any d Continue reading >>

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Non Diabetics Vs. Diabetics

Healthy Blood Sugar Levels For Non Diabetics Vs. Diabetics

Although commonly referred to as a single condition, diabetes is actually a group of diseases that are considered metabolic conditions whereby a person’s blood glucose becomes elevated beyond healthy blood sugar levels. There are multiple reasons why this might occur, but in most cases it is either related to reduce levels of insulin production or an improper physiological response to insulin. However, what we generally consider healthy blood sugar levels are not always easy to identify and can vary based on age, type of condition present and time since last meal. The first of these considerations is simply timing. Obviously, when food is ingested, it can cause the sugar levels in blood to increase. This can be particularly true depending on what types of food are being ingested. Although in almost all cases, sugar levels in blood will increase following a meal, the types of food ingested can significantly impact this number. For instance, foods high in carbohydrates tend to have the most profound impact on sugar levels both in persons with and without diabetes. At the same time, it is not uncommon for low or even abnormally low blood sugar levels to be present before a meal. This fluctuation occurs both in persons with and without diabetes, although its more greatly apparent in persons without normal, healthy blood sugar levels. Aside from meals, age also plays a factor in what is considered appropriate for blood sugar levels normal range readings. For instance, a diabetic adult with Type 1 diabetes might expect to find a blood glucose level of somewhere under 160 mg/dL following a meal (a period known as postprandial). However, A child with the same condition will find that after a meal, their blood sugar levels normal range might be closer to 180 mg / dL. This is n Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Young Children With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Young Children With Diabetes

Children's blood sugar levels -- especially when they're little -- can be all over the place. No one expects that they'll be perfect all the time. Your goal is simple: Get it into the target range when it isn't, because your child's body can't. Test his blood sugar several times a day so you'll know what you need to do to adjust it. What causes the ups and downs? Food Growth Illness Stress and other emotions Remember, the numbers on the meter aren't "good" or "bad" -- they're just numbers. And they give you information about how to keep your child healthy and happy throughout the day and night. Testing is the best way to avoid dangerously high and low levels. You might not notice symptoms, and your child may not be able to explain what's happening. If he can't talk yet, he certainly can't tell you he feels funny. As your child gets older, his targets will change. Your doctor will help you figure out what levels are right for your child. Continue reading >>

What Are Healthy Glucose Levels In Children?

What Are Healthy Glucose Levels In Children?

Children grow rapidly, and their bodies need glucose for normal development. At the same time, young children can have problems recognizing or communicating the symptoms of low blood sugar or hypoglycemia. Consequently, healthy glucose levels in children are usually higher than healthy glucose levels in adults. Different children have different needs; your child's health care provider can determine the best glucose levels for your child as he grows and develops. Elevated glucose levels could indicate a need for diabetic testing. Video of the Day For children from birth to age 5, normal blood sugar targets are 100 to 200mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars should be near the low end of the range. Blood sugars after meals and before bedtime should be near the upper end of the range. If the blood sugar before bedtime is below 150mg/dL, your child's health care provider may recommend a bedtime snack and/or testing during the night. Ages 5 to 11 For children who are between the ages of 5 and 11, normal blood sugar targets are 70 to 150mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars should be nearer to 70mg/dL. Blood sugar after meals and before bedtime should be near 150mg/dL. If the blood sugar before bedtime is below 120mg/dL, your child's doctor may recommend a bedtime snack and/or testing during the night. For a child who is 12 or older, healthy glucose levels are essentially the same as those of adults: near 70 mg/dL when fasting and 150 mg/dL after meals. If the blood sugar before bedtime is below 100 mg/dL, ask your child's doctor about a bedtime snack or testing during the night. Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Range For Non Diabetic Child

Normal Blood Sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Range For Non Diabetic Child

Normal Blood sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Range For Non Diabetic Child Endocrine glands within the pancreas relieve the the bodys hormones insulin and glucagon. These hormones control the blood glucose (sugar) levels in this body. Insulin advances the transportation of blood sugar to cells. The solar cells absorb the glucose through the blood in addition to convert the idea into vitality. Insufficient insulin generation, or difficulty in absorption of sugar and carbohydrates by cells can result in diabetes. Abnormal movement in blood glucose levels can bring about serious health and fitness complications. Related Keyword :Normal Blood Sugar Of Adults,Normal Fasting Blood Glucose Levels Canadian Diabetes Association andNormal Blood Sugar Levels Mg/ml. Related Image Of Normal Blood sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Range For Non Diabetic Child Diabetes as a result of severe scarcity of insulin is called type 1 diabetes, and it really is more prevalent in older people. It is usually an autoimmune condition. When cells become the immune system to insulin, the condition is known as type 3 diabetes. As your cells create insulin level of resistance, blood mister levels improve. Pancreas produces a lot more insulin to manipulate the raised levels. But because of insulin resistance, it gets to be difficult to overpower those amounts. Capacity with the pancreas to make insulin is bound and this high levels of insulin made by the pancreas also are most often insufficient in order to reduce the blood sugar. High glucose levels are known as hyperglycemia and low blood sugar levels are often known as hypoglycemia. A easy blood test helps measure the degree of sugar inside blood. The amount of sugar inside blood, before along with after having, is appreciably different. So, normal Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Blood Sugar Level Ranges

Tweet Understanding blood glucose level ranges can be a key part of diabetes self-management. This page states 'normal' blood sugar ranges and blood sugar ranges for adults and children with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and blood sugar ranges to determine people with diabetes. If a person with diabetes has a meter, test strips and is testing, it's important to know what the blood glucose level means. Recommended blood glucose levels have a degree of interpretation for every individual and you should discuss this with your healthcare team. In addition, women may be set target blood sugar levels during pregnancy. The following ranges are guidelines provided by the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) but each individual’s target range should be agreed by their doctor or diabetic consultant. Recommended target blood glucose level ranges The NICE recommended target blood glucose levels are stated below for adults with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and children with type 1 diabetes. In addition, the International Diabetes Federation's target ranges for people without diabetes is stated. [19] [89] [90] The table provides general guidance. An individual target set by your healthcare team is the one you should aim for. NICE recommended target blood glucose level ranges Target Levels by Type Upon waking Before meals (pre prandial) At least 90 minutes after meals (post prandial) Non-diabetic* 4.0 to 5.9 mmol/L under 7.8 mmol/L Type 2 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L under 8.5 mmol/L Type 1 diabetes 5 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L Children w/ type 1 diabetes 4 to 7 mmol/L 4 to 7 mmol/L 5 to 9 mmol/L *The non-diabetic figures are provided for information but are not part of NICE guidelines. Normal and diabetic blood sugar ranges For the majority of healthy ind Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Type 1 Diabetes In Children

Print Diagnosis There are several blood tests for type 1 diabetes in children: Random blood sugar test. This is the primary screening test for type 1 diabetes. A blood sample is taken at a random time. Regardless of when your child last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11.1 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), or higher suggests diabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This test indicates your child's average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample is taken after your child fasts overnight. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 1 diabetes. Additional tests Your doctor will likely recommend additional tests to confirm the type of diabetes that your child has. It's important to distinguish between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes because treatment strategies differ. These additional tests include: Blood tests to check for antibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes Urine tests to check for the presence of ketones, which also suggests type 1 diabetes rather than type 2 After the diagnosis Your child will need regular follow-up appointments to ensure good diabetes management and to check his or her A1C levels. The American Diabetes Association recommends an A1C of 7.5 or lower for all children. Your doctor also will periodically use blood and urine tests to check your child's: Cholesterol levels Thyroid function Kidney function In addition, your doctor will regularly: Assess your child's blood pressure and growth Check the sites Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

BLOOD SUGARS: THE NONDIABETIC VERSUS THE DIABETIC Since high blood sugar is the hallmark of diabetes, and the cause of every long-term complication of the disease, it makes sense to discuss where blood sugar comes from and how it is used and not used. Our dietary sources of blood sugar are carbohydrates and proteins. One reason the taste of sugar—a simple form of carbohydrate—delights us is that it fosters production of neurotransmitters in the brain that relieve anxiety and can create a sense of well-being or even euphoria. This makes carbohydrate quite addictive to certain people whose brains may have inadequate levels of or sensitivity to these neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers with which the brain communicates with itself and the rest of the body. When blood sugar levels are low, the liver, kidneys, and intestines can, through a process we will discuss shortly, convert proteins into glucose, but very slowly and inefficiently. The body cannot convert glucose back into protein, nor can it convert fat into sugar. Fat cells, however, with the help of insulin, do transform glucose into fat. The taste of protein doesn’t excite us as much as that of carbohydrate— it would be the very unusual child who’d jump up and down in the grocery store and beg his mother for steak or fish instead of cookies. Dietary protein gives us a much slower and smaller blood sugar effect, which, as you will see, we diabetics can use to our advantage in normalizing blood sugars. The Nondiabetic In the fasting nondiabetic, and even in most type 2 diabetics, the pancreas constantly releases a steady, low level of insulin. This baseline, or basal, insulin level prevents the liver, kidneys, and intestines from inappropriately converting bodily proteins (muscle, vital organs) into g Continue reading >>

Testing And Your Child

Testing And Your Child

An essential part of managing your child’s diabetes is frequently testing their blood sugar levels (also known as blood glucose levels) to help avoid highs and lows – and knowing when to test for ketones. At times, this testing may be difficult – both for you and your child, especially if they’re very young. Good diabetes management is important both for your child’s day-to-day health and to help prevent any diabetes-related problems in later life. Regular testing of your child’s blood sugar level is a key part of this. Your paediatric diabetes team will give you a blood glucose meter, used to check your child’s blood sugar levels. Normally, there are a few to choose from and your diabetes team will help you and your child make the right choice. Your meter comes with a finger-pricking device and an initial supply of lancets (to take a drop of blood from the finger) and testing strips (to apply a drop of blood to, in order to get the result). Your diabetes team will also explain to you how to get further free supplies of these on prescription from your GP. Many parents worry or are anxious about testing their child’s blood sugar levels. Pricking their fingers can be painful, especially at first, and no parent wants to hurt their child. Then there’s the anxiety about what the levels will be. You’ll be told your child’s target levels to aim for, and it can be frustrating and even scary if you’re not meeting these. Wash your child’s hands. Prick the side of your child’s finger rather than the tip, as this keeps pain to a minimum. Don’t prick too near the nail and don’t prick the index finger or thumb. Devices are now available that allow you to take blood from different parts of the body, such as the base of the thumb or the arm. Talk to your Continue reading >>

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