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Normal Blood Sugar Level For 70 Years Old

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is essential to your mental and physical health. The normal blood sugar levels chart below shows the range to shoot for and the diabetes blood sugar levels chart shows levels to avoid. What is blood sugar? It’s the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream that your body uses to produce energy. For most people, normal blood sugar levels range from 80 up to 140 – naturally fluctuating throughout the day. A healthy body has effective ways of regulating normal blood sugar levels. For example, if your blood sugar falls too low, extra glucose stored in your liver is absorbed into your bloodstream to make up the difference. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood sugar is the fuel your body needs for energy. Insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, helps you maintain normal blood sugar levels. This blood sugar levels chart below shows a normal blood sugar range. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart TIMING OF BLOOD SUGAR NORMAL RANGE (mg/dl) When you wake (before eating) 80 to 120 Before eating a meal 80 to 120 Taken 2 hours after eating Less than 140 Bedtime blood sugar range 100 to 140 Eating high glycemic carbohydrates is the main cause of higher than normal blood sugar levels and can lead to heart disease, diabetes, blindness, kidney disease and limb amputation from gangrene. Very high blood sugar can even lead to a diabetic coma. The chart below compares diabetes blood sugar levels to normal blood sugar levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels vs Normal Blood Sugar Levels BLOOD SUGAR CLASSIFICATION FASTING MINIMUM FASTING MAXIMUM 2 HOURS AFTER EATING Normal Blood Sugar 70 120 Less than 140 Early Diabetes 100 125 140 to 200 Established Diabetes Over 125 Over 125 More than 200 *All numbers are mg/dl. How to Use Your Blood Sugar Lev Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Overtreatment Of Elderly Diabetics

Overtreatment Of Elderly Diabetics

The last time I was directly responsible for treating diabetes was fifty years ago, when I was an intern in medicine at UCLA. In my subsequent career as a psychiatrist I was not directly responsible for diabetes care, and as an individual, I don’t have the condition. As a result, I haven’t kept up on diabetes treatment, so a June 11 article on “Diabetes Overtreatment in Elderly Individuals: Risky Business in Need of Better Management” was news to me. The opening two sentences of the American Diabetes Association’s article on “Tight Diabetes Control” make it sound as if “tight control” should be the goal of treatment: “Keeping your blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible can be a lifesaver. Tight control can prevent or slow the progress of many complications of diabetes, giving you extra years of healthy, active life.” In my uninformed state, that’s how I understood how diabetes should be managed, even for over 65ers. But I was wrong. Several paragraphs later there’s a very clear statement that elderly people with diabetes should be treated differently: “Elderly people probably should not go on tight control. Hypoglycemia [overly low blood sugar] can cause strokes and heart attacks in older people. Also, the major goal of tight control is to prevent complications many years later. Tight control is most worthwhile for healthy people who can expect to live at least 10 more years.” The American Geriatrics Society gives precise guidelines for the goal of diabetes treatment in over 65ers. The key measure of diabetes control is hemoglobin A1c. For healthy over 65ers with long life expectancy, the target should be 7.0 – 7.5%. For those with “moderate comorbidity” (so-so health) and a life expectancy of less than 10 years the targe Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar In People Over 60?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar In People Over 60?

Age isn’t a factor when it comes to determining a safe blood sugar level. However, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes does increase with age. Diabetes is a condition that occurs when blood sugar levels rise because the body can’t use a type of sugar called glucose normally. If you’re overweight and over age 45, the American Diabetes Association recommends being tested for diabetes during your next routine medical exam. If your weight is normal and you're over 45, ask your doctor if testing is appropriate. Video of the Day Glucose is the body’s main source of energy, and glucose levels in the blood are regulated by the hormone insulin, which is made in the pancreas. Type 1 diabetes occurs if the pancreas doesn’t make any or enough insulin. In the far more common type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t respond normally to insulin secretions. Both children and adults can suffer from diabetes. Symptoms include extreme thirst, increased urination and unexplained weight loss. To test if you have high blood sugar or might be at risk of developing diabetes, you can take a fasting glucose test, or FGT, or an oral glucose tolerance test, or OGTT. You need to fast overnight before taking either test. With the FGT test, blood glucose is measured first thing in the morning before eating. With the OGTT test, blood glucose is measured after fasting and two hours after drinking a glucose-rich drink. Your fasting blood glucose level is considered normal if it’s below 100 milligrams per deciliter. You’re considered borderline diabetic if your blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL. If you measure 126 mg/dL or more on two different days, you have diabetes. Without testing, you might not even be aware that your blood sugar is higher than normal, but treatment is important. Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Levels For Women

Normal Blood Sugar Levels For Women

Glucose is the main source of energy and is derived from carbohydrates. Whenever we eat carbohydrate foods, they are broken down or metabolized into simple sugar molecules, known as glucose. From the bloodstream, glucose enters the body cells and tissues. This process is facilitated by the hormone insulin, secreted by the beta cells of the pancreas. Whenever we eat food, the level of glucose in blood rises, which in turn stimulates the pancreas to release insulin. Insulin then enables the cells and tissues of the body to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a result, the level of blood sugar drops down to the normal level. In this way, the level of blood sugar is maintained at a normal range. Normal Blood Glucose Levels for Women The level of blood sugar can fluctuate to an extent throughout the day. As has been mentioned already, the blood sugar levels rise after meals. Normally, the level of blood sugar is lower in the morning, and then rises after meals. Therefore, more than one test is used to measure the level of blood sugar in both men and women. Blood sugar levels are measured in two ways, either randomly throughout the day or after fasting. Random Blood Sugar Test: In general, the range of normal blood sugar, when measured randomly throughout the day is 70 to 140 mg/dL. For women, normal blood sugar levels after eating can be around 135 to 140 mg/dL. Sometimes, the level can go up to 180 mg/dL within one hour from the time of eating a meal. Fasting Blood Sugar Test: The normal range for fasting blood sugar levels for women is 70 to 100 mg/dL. The fasting blood sugar level is measured after fasting for at least eight hours. To measure this blood sugar level, an individual is required not to eat or drink anything (except water) for at least 8 hours. 2-hour Post Continue reading >>

For Elderly Diabetics, Questions About Aggressive Care

For Elderly Diabetics, Questions About Aggressive Care

The more I talk to researchers about caring for older people, the more a couple of themes emerge. Namely: a) Sometimes less really is more. Overtreatment can create big problems, as a recent post on prescribing antibiotics for common urinary tract infections reported, and it happens frequently. b) Older bodies respond differently from younger ones, a reality health care providers don’t always take into consideration. A routine that includes a few late-day cocktails, to take one of many examples, can be a pleasure for a 40-year-old but a danger for an 80-year-old. The latest conversation I’ve had along those lines, with Dr. Sei J. Lee, a geriatrician at San Francisco’s V.A. Medical Center, concerned diabetes, a huge health issue for seniors. More than a quarter of adults over 65 have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Should the elderly respond to Type 2 diabetes in the same way as younger patients? Maybe not, Dr. Lee suggested in a recent commentary in The Journal of the American Medical Association. People with Type 2 diabetes hear a lot about “glycemic control,” keeping their blood sugar levels down through diet and exercise and, when necessary, medications. The target number, for most adults under most guidelines, is 7 percent on the commonly used A1C hemoglobin test. “For younger patients, if we can get them down to near-normal levels, then over the long term — 10 or 20 years — the risk of severe complications, like the need for kidney dialysis, are lower,” Dr. Lee explained. Lower blood sugar substantially reduces the odds of diabetics’ developing blindness and kidney disease, research shows; it also appears to help ward off heart attacks, strokes and amputations, though that’s less well documented. Maintaining that numb Continue reading >>

What Blood Sugar Range Is Considered Normal For A 65-year-old Male?

What Blood Sugar Range Is Considered Normal For A 65-year-old Male?

Normal blood sugar (glucose) is the same irrespective of gender or adult age. Frequently treatment goals are confused with the normal values which define whether one is normal, has Prediabetes, or Diabetes. Also the answer varies between fasting blood sugar or post-prandial (after eating). So with that preamble: Normal fasting blood sugar is 60–99 mg/dL Normal post- prandial blood sugar is < 140 Prediabetes (fasting) 100–125 Prediabetes (postprandial) 140–199 Diabetes (fasting) > 125 (on 2 separate occasions) Diabetes (postprandial) = or > 200 (on 2 separate occasions unless uniquely high or accompanied by classic diabetes symptoms) Also the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) can be used for diagnosis. This represents a measure of the average blood sugar over the last 3 months. Normal is <5.6% Prediabetes 5.6–6.4% Diabetes >6.4% Treatment goal align with these numbers align but are not the same as the normal numbers, and differ between the ADA (American Diabetes Assn), AACE (American Assn of Clinical Endocrinologists) and the European societies. However the goals are relaxed when someone is older, sicker, more impaired or fragile due to the risks of hypoglycemia- especially if treating with sulfonylureas or insulin. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

The fluctuation of blood sugar (red) and the sugar-lowering hormone insulin (blue) in humans during the course of a day with three meals. One of the effects of a sugar-rich vs a starch-rich meal is highlighted.[1] The blood sugar level, blood sugar concentration, or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose present in the blood of humans and other animals. Glucose is a simple sugar and approximately 4 grams of glucose are present in the blood of humans at all times.[2] The body tightly regulates blood glucose levels as a part of metabolic homeostasis.[2] Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle and liver cells in the form of glycogen;[2] in fasted individuals, blood glucose is maintained at a constant level at the expense of glycogen stores in the liver and skeletal muscle.[2] In humans, glucose is the primary source of energy, and is critical for normal function, in a number of tissues,[2] particularly the human brain which consumes approximately 60% of blood glucose in fasted, sedentary individuals.[2] Glucose can be transported from the intestines or liver to other tissues in the body via the bloodstream.[2] Cellular glucose uptake is primarily regulated by insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas.[2] Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimoles. Blood sugar levels outside the normal range may be an indicator of a medical condition. A persistently high level is referred to as hyperglycemia; low levels are referred to as hypoglycemia. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia from any of several causes, and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. There are different methods of testing and measuring blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Feature/diabetes Care For Older Adults

Feature/diabetes Care For Older Adults

Diabetes Spectrum Volume 12 Number 2, 1999, Pages 70 – 77 These pages are best viewed with Netscape version 3.0 or higher or Internet Explorer version 3.0 or higher. When viewed with other browsers, some characters or attributes may not be rendered correctly. Feature/Diabetes Care for Older Adults Mooradian and Associates Diabetes Care for Older Adults Arshag D. Mooradian, MD, Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, Cecilia Casey Boyer, RN, MSN, CDE, and Jewel Winter, BSN, GNP Abstract Diabetes is a common problem in older adults. Approximately 20% of individuals over 65 years of age have diabetes mellitus, and almost half of these individuals have not been diagnosed. However, there are widespread misconceptions about possible consequences of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, the rate at which diabetic complications develop, and the role of multidisciplinary management. Overall, management strategies for diabetes in older adults are no different from those of diabetes in younger groups, with some exceptions. Unlike younger people with type 2 diabetes, who are often overweight, obesity is not that common among older diabetes patients. In nursing homes, the problem of being underweight is as common as that of being overweight. Thus, nutritional management should focus on weight gain for underweight elderly patients as much as it is focused on weight loss for obese patients. In addition to diet and exercise, pharmacological therapy is often required for optimizing blood glucose control. Target blood glucose ranges should be individualized. In frail patients, fasting plasma glucose levels should range from 100 to 140 mg/dl, and postprandial values should be <200 mg/dl. Older subjects may require extra educational support to become proficient in self-monitoring of blood glucose. The discovery Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

www.CardioSmart.org What is a blood sugar reading? A blood sugar reading shows how much sugar, or glucose, is in your blood. A test of your blood sugar may be done to: • Check for diabetes. • See how well diabetes treatment is working. • Check for diabetes that occurs during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). • Check for low or high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). What are normal blood sugar readings? There are several types of blood sugar tests. Normal results can vary from lab to lab. Talk with your doctor about what any abnormal results might mean, and about any symptoms and other health problems you have. Normal values for adults who do NOT have prediabetes or diabetes Less than or equal to 100 When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 140 if you are age 50 or younger; less than 150 if you are age 50 to 60; less than 160 if you are age 60 and older 2 hours after eating (postprandial): Levels vary depending on when and how much you ate at your last meal. In general: 80 to 120 beforemeals or when waking up; 100 to 140 at bedtime. Random (casual): Target values for nonpregnant adults who have prediabetes or diabetes 80 to 130When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 1802 hours after eating (postprandial): What causes abnormal blood sugar? High blood sugar can be caused by: • Diabetes or prediabetes. • Certain medicines, such as corticosteroids. Low blood sugar can be caused by: • Certain medicines, especially those used to treat diabetes. • Liver disease, such as cirrhosis. Rarely, high or low blood sugar can be caused by other medical problems that affect hormone levels. Prediabetes and diabetes Blood sugar helps fuel your body. Normally, your blood sugar rises slightly af Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Glucose In Children

Normal Blood Glucose In Children

Children grow at a rapid rate and for the normal functioning of their brain and organs, their bodies require optimal amount of glucose. Usually, children develop type 1 diabetes due to imbalance of glucose. In childhood, it is difficult at times to recognise the indications of low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia). Every child has different needs; ask your doctor to determine the best glucose levels for your child. Right Blood Sugar Range The blood sugar levels of healthy children lie between 70 and 150 mg/dL. It is normal if your child's blood sugar fluctuates in this range. Blood sugar is typically higher after having a meal and lower after intense physical workout. To help keep your child’s blood sugar in the normal range, ensure that you are giving him healthy diet full of fresh fruits and vegetables. Normal blood sugar level according to age groups 0-5 years Normal blood sugar range in babies from newborns to five year olds is 100 to 200mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars should be near 100 mg/dL. Blood sugars after having meals and before going to bed should be somewhat close to 200mg/dl. If it is found below 150mg/dL before bedtime, it must be reported to your child's health care provider. He may recommend a bedtime snack and/or testing before going to bed. 5-11 years For children who are aged between 5-11, normal blood glucose levels are 70 to 150mg/dL. Fasting blood sugars must be close to the lower end of normal sugar level. Blood sugar after meals and before bedtime should be close to the upper end. Glucose level below 120mg/dL during night calls for medical attention. Age 12 and above For children who are 12 or above, normal blood sugar levels are similar to those of adults. Your doctor will recommend a bedtime snack if your child’s blood glucose level is lower than 1 Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Know the basic steps for managing your diabetes. Poorly managed diabetes can lead to many health problems. Know how to: Monitor your blood sugar (glucose) Find, buy, and store diabetes supplies If you take insulin, you should also know how to: Give yourself insulin Adjust your insulin doses and the foods you eat to manage your blood sugar during exercise and on sick days You should also live a healthy lifestyle. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Do muscle strengthening exercises 2 or more days a week. Avoid sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time. Try speed walking, swimming, or dancing. Pick an activity you enjoy. Always check with your doctor before starting any new exercise plans. Follow your meal plan. Take your medicines the way your health care provider recommends. Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about how often you should check your blood sugar. Not everyone with diabetes needs to check their blood sugar every day. But some people may need to check it many times a day. If you have type 1 diabetes, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Usually, you will test your blood sugar before meals and at bedtime. You may also check your blood sugar: After you eat out, especially if you have eaten foods you don't normally eat If you feel sick Before and after you exercise If you have a lot of stress If you eat too much If you are taking new medicines Keep a record for yourself and your provider. This will be a big help if you are having problems managing your diabetes. It will also tell you what works and what doesn't work, to keep your blood sugar under control. Write down: The time of day Your blood sugar level Th Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting Blood Sugar: Normal Levels And Testing

Fasting blood sugar provides vital clues about how the body is managing blood sugar levels. Blood sugar tends to peak about an hour after eating, and declines after that. High fasting blood sugar levels point to insulin resistance or diabetes. Abnormally low fasting blood sugar could be due to diabetes medications. Knowing when to test and what to look for can help keep people with, or at risk of, diabetes healthy. What are fasting blood sugar levels? Following a meal, blood sugar levels rise, usually peaking about an hour after eating. How much blood sugar rises by and the precise timing of the peak depends on diet. Large meals tend to trigger larger blood sugar rises. High-sugar carbohydrates, such as bread and sweetened snacks, also cause more significant blood sugar swings. Normally, as blood sugar rises, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin lowers blood sugar, breaking it down so that the body can use it for energy or store it for later. However, people who have diabetes have difficulties with insulin in the following ways: People with type 1 diabetes do not produce enough insulin because the body attacks insulin-producing cells. People with type 2 diabetes do not respond well to insulin and, later, may not make enough insulin. In both cases, the result is the same: elevated blood sugar levels and difficulties using sugar. This means that fasting blood sugar depends on three factors: the contents of the last meal the size of the last meal the body's ability to produce and respond to insulin Blood sugar levels in between meals offer a window into how the body manages sugar. High levels of fasting blood sugar suggest that the body has been unable to lower the levels of sugar in the blood. This points to either insulin resistance or inadequate insulin production, an Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

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