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Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours

The Overnight Blood Sugar Conundrum

The Overnight Blood Sugar Conundrum

How do I stay in range while sleeping? In the past week, I’ve seen these two 24-hour CGM traces: It’s amazing that the same overnight insulin dose produced those two markedly different midnight-to-9am glucose outcomes (left side of each graph). The example on the right, I believe, was caused by: (i) a big late-night dinner after barely eating all day, and (ii) changing my pump’s infusion set and reservoir right before bed, without confirming a few hours later that it was working properly. Whatever the cause, I woke up at 7:50 am on Tuesday at 262 mg/dl – exhausted, frustrated, and late for a team event. I changed my pump site quickly, took a huge six-unit insulin bolus, and decided at the last minute to ride my bike 4.5 miles to the event. Halfway down the steep hill from my house, I had that sinking feeling: “Gah! I should go back home and get glucose tabs, just in case.” I cycled back, grabbed the tabs, and then my prediction turned out to be correct 15 minutes later – halfway to the event, my glucose was dropping faster than I’d ever seen in my life. I ate three tabs as a buffer and luckily avoided going low. By 9:05 am, I had arrived for our team photo event covered in embarrassing business-casual sweat, but back in range. And from there, the workday could actually begin. I tell this story to illustrate a larger point – overnight blood sugar has a major impact on the next day. Unfortunately, keeping glucose in range every single night is very difficult without an automated system. This article shares some of my Bright Spots for beating this nighttime conundrum, gleaned from those nights like the example above on the left. Enjoy, and get all my Bright Spots & Landmines here (free PDF) or at Amazon. Overnight BGs in a tight, safe range (80-140 mg/dl) Continue reading >>

Why Doesn’t My Average Blood Glucose Match My A1c?!

Why Doesn’t My Average Blood Glucose Match My A1c?!

So, you test your meter for accuracy and everything looks good. You take your average BG and convert it to A1C using a table, calculator, or equation you find online. Then, you get your blood work done and learn that your actual A1C is… Not even close! What’s the deal? As it turns out, the relationship between average BG and A1C isn’t as clear as most of us think. After doing some research, I came across a couple reasons why someone’s actual A1C may be higher or lower than expected… But before we get into that, let’s briefly go over why A1C is used to approximate average glucose over ~3 months: As glucose enters your blood, it attaches to a protein in your red blood cells called “hemoglobin.” Hemoglobin is the same protein that carries oxygen in your bloodstream, and it is what gives blood its red color A1C measures the total amount of glucose that has attached to your hemoglobin over the lifespan of your red blood cells (typically ~3 months). OK, now that we’ve got the science down, here’s why your average BG and lab-measured A1C values might not match up: 1. BG meter average does not usually reflect the average over a full 24 hours This reason is pretty obvious. If you are not on a CGM, it’s tough to get a full picture of your average blood glucose throughout the day. We generally test much more during the day than at night, and nighttime glucose values may be very different from daytime values. We also tend to test more often before eating (when glucose is typically lower), and less often after meals (when glucose is typically higher). So, for most people, BG meter average doesn’t accurately reflect average blood glucose over a full 24 hours. A1C, on the other hand, does. If you want your BG meter average to better reflect your A1C values, che Continue reading >>

How Much Should Sugars Fluctuate Before & After Meals?

How Much Should Sugars Fluctuate Before & After Meals?

Everyone’s blood sugar, or blood glucose levels, will fluctuate throughout the day. The main factors that affect blood sugar include what and how much you eat and how long it’s been since your last meal. Activity level, stress, infection or illness can also affect glucose levels. Generally, your blood sugar is lowest when you’ve fasted overnight, or for at least eight hours, and highest within an hour or two after eating foods that are high in carbohydrates. Blood glucose can be measured by a blood test in a lab or from a finger stick and a glucose meter. A normal blood glucose reading after fasting overnight is between 70 and 100 milligrams per deciliter. Most healthy people's blood sugar will be within this range for most of the day and night because the body’s hormones insulin and glucagon work to keep glucose from going too high or low. On the High End If your blood glucose is checked after you’ve eaten, it may be higher, but how high depends on what you ate and how long it’s been since you ate. Foods that are rich in carbohydrates, like breads, pasta, potatoes, sugary drinks or desserts, will raise blood sugar the highest. Blood sugar goes up for an hour or two after you eat, and then it starts to return to normal. Even after meals, a healthy person’s blood sugar is usually less than 140 mg/dl. If It’s Too High Blood glucose levels that are too high may mean you have prediabetes or diabetes. Prediabetes, also know as impaired fasting glucose, is diagnosed when your fasting blood glucose is higher than the normal range and between 100 and 125 mg/dl. This increases the risk of diabetes. A diagnosis of diabetes is made if fasting blood glucose is over 126 mg/dl or you have two random glucose measurements over 200 mg/dl. Occasionally, medical problems o Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Glucose Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours

Normal Blood Glucose Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours

Normal Blood glucose Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours – Endocrine glands inside the pancreas generate the human hormones insulin along with glucagon. These human hormones control the blood glucose (glucose) levels in our body. Insulin helps bring about the move of blood glucose to body cells. The cells absorb the particular glucose in the blood and also convert it into electricity. Insufficient insulin generation, or problem in assimilation of glucose by cells can bring about diabetes. Abnormal variances in blood glucose can lead to serious wellness complications. Related Keyword : Normal Blood Sugar Levels After Eating Australia, Normal Blood Sugar Levels With Metformin and Normal Blood Glucose Levels During The Day. Related Image Of Normal Blood glucose Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours Diabetes because of severe deficiency of insulin is termed type 1 diabetes, and it truly is more frequent in grownups. It is an autoimmune problem. When cells become immune system to insulin, the condition is known as type 3 diabetes. As the cells build insulin amount of resistance, blood glucose levels increase. Pancreas produces an increasing number of insulin to control the elevated levels. But on account of insulin weight, it will become difficult to manipulate those ranges. Capacity of the pancreas to provide insulin is fixed and this high amounts of insulin produced by the pancreas also seem to be insufficient to lessen the blood glucose levels. High glucose levels are known as hyperglycemia and low blood sugar levels are known as hypoglycemia. Tests to be able to Measure Blood glucose A straightforward blood analyze helps measure the quality of sugar inside blood. The amount of sugar with blood, before as well as after ingesting, is drastically different. So, Continue reading >>

About Glucose Curves

About Glucose Curves

Go to site For Pet Owners The glucose curve is a great tool to differentiate between an insufficient insulin dose and the Somogyi effect. It helps to determine insulin effectiveness and the maximum and minimum levels of glycemia, which ideally should be between 120–300 mg/dL (5.6–16.7mmol/L) for cats for most of the day.8 Try our online glucose curve generator. Veterinarians commonly adjust the insulin dose based on a blood glucose curve. When creating a glucose curve, remember that stress can affect the reliability of results, and the glucose curve is only one tool among others that can help diagnose and monitor diabetes mellitus. Take clinical signs (or lack thereof) into account when contemplating any change in the insulin therapy. The ultimate goal in regulating the diabetic cat is to control the clinical signs adequately so that the patient enjoys a good quality of life. How to complete a glucose curve The procedure is as follows: shortly after the animal has been given its first meal (preferably at home), the first blood sample is taken just prior to the insulin injection in the morning. Thereafter, blood samples are collected every 2 hours throughout the day for 12 hours, if possible. These data are then plotted on a graph to generate a curve. Veterinarians can determine based on the nadir whether the dose needs to be increased or decreased (or remain as is). How to interpret a glucose curve The aim of treatment is to alleviate clinical signs of diabetes. To achieve this goal, keep blood glucose concentrations below the renal threshold and avoid hypoglycemia. Thus, the goal is to maintain blood glucose concentrations roughly between 120 to 300 mg/dL in cats for the majority of the day.8 The duration of insulin action is measured from the time of Vetsulin® (p Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

Normal blood sugar level is between 3.8 and 7.5 millimoles per liter. The body maintains sugar in the form of glucose in the blood at all times, even during rest or sleep, and this is available to provide energy to the organs and cells. The level is usually described in millimoles per liter (mmol/L) or milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). The conversion rate between the two is 18.02, simply multiply mmol/L by this factor to get mg/dL. Divide by this factor going the other way. So normal level is 3.8 to 7.5 mmol/L or 68 to 135 mg/dL. There is a regulatory mechanism in the body which controls the blood sugar level. If this mechanism does not work properly, or is overloaded, it can lead to problems. If it falls too low the person may faint or fall into a coma, if it gets too high it can cause damage to organs in the body, particularly the kidneys and eyes, as well as causing discomfort. The above chart shows a fairly typical blood sugar level over a 24 hour period. It reaches it's lowest level just before breakfast and climbs to it's highest point shortly after the evening meal. As can be seen from the chart there are three spikes which correspond to the regular meals. It is beneficial to keep these spikes to a moderate level, they can put a strain on the body's regulatory mechanism, and over time lead to health problems. The ideal way to reduce the height of the blood sugar spikes is to eat less but more often, and to choose foods with a lower glycemic load. High Blood Sugar Symptoms Unfortunately the symptoms of hyperglycemia and not very obvious in the short term. Examples may be: 1. Thirst. 2. Frequent urination. 3. Excessive hunger. 4. Dry mouth. 5. Fatigue. 6. Blurred vision. But the symptoms may not be obvious so it is worth having occasional tests as part of an overal Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is essential to your mental and physical health. The normal blood sugar levels chart below shows the range to shoot for and the diabetes blood sugar levels chart shows levels to avoid. What is blood sugar? It’s the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream that your body uses to produce energy. For most people, normal blood sugar levels range from 80 up to 140 – naturally fluctuating throughout the day. A healthy body has effective ways of regulating normal blood sugar levels. For example, if your blood sugar falls too low, extra glucose stored in your liver is absorbed into your bloodstream to make up the difference. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood sugar is the fuel your body needs for energy. Insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, helps you maintain normal blood sugar levels. This blood sugar levels chart below shows a normal blood sugar range. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart TIMING OF BLOOD SUGAR NORMAL RANGE (mg/dl) When you wake (before eating) 80 to 120 Before eating a meal 80 to 120 Taken 2 hours after eating Less than 140 Bedtime blood sugar range 100 to 140 Eating high glycemic carbohydrates is the main cause of higher than normal blood sugar levels and can lead to heart disease, diabetes, blindness, kidney disease and limb amputation from gangrene. Very high blood sugar can even lead to a diabetic coma. The chart below compares diabetes blood sugar levels to normal blood sugar levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels vs Normal Blood Sugar Levels BLOOD SUGAR CLASSIFICATION FASTING MINIMUM FASTING MAXIMUM 2 HOURS AFTER EATING Normal Blood Sugar 70 120 Less than 140 Early Diabetes 100 125 140 to 200 Established Diabetes Over 125 Over 125 More than 200 *All numbers are mg/dl. How to Use Your Blood Sugar Lev Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Curves I’ve Done On My Diabetic Cats And What Those Curves Told Me.

Blood Glucose Curves I’ve Done On My Diabetic Cats And What Those Curves Told Me.

But! If my errors help you then a little of my shame is worth it! This is a blood glucose curve on Paris, on 1.5 units of PZI insulin once a day, injected at 8:30 in the morning. The blood sugar range for a non-diabetic cat is about 4-8 millimoles per litre. (mmol/l) For a diabetic cat, I would suggest that an acceptable range would be between about 6-15 mmol/l. Not so low that you risk a hypo episode, and not too high that the kidneys are being stressed. (Your vet may decide on a different range for your cat.) The first thing this chart shows me is that poor poor Paris should NOT have had an insulin shot at all this day - with a reading of 8.5 mmol/l he was only just outside the range for a normal cat! Consequently, Paris spent approximately 12 hours from 11:00am to 11:00pm being under the normal range, thus risking a potentially fatal hypoglycaemic episode. The good news is that this chart seems to show that one shot per day of this insulin gives adequate coverage for him. In other words it kept his blood glucose levels down from 8:30am in the morning until about 1:00am when his blood glucose level started to rise. Just to prove that I can learn from my own mistakes, his closing reading on this chart (5.3 mmol/l) which was his reading at 8:30am the following morning meant he didn’t get an injection that day! This second image is one of Tatty’s early charts. It shows her readings on Lente insulin twice a day. She was getting two units in the morning at 9:30am and one unit at 7:00pm. Again the yellow band covers readings from 5 to 15 millimoles per litre (mmol/l) which I would consider acceptable. Above about 12-15 the kidneys are overwhelmed and the renal threshold exceeded - and long-term damage to the kidneys could result. This chart is too spiky. She starts the Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

Diabetics On A Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetics On A Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetes is a disorder of glucose intolerance. What happens when a diabetic eats a low-carbohydrate diet? Here's a graph of blood glucose over a 24 hour period, in type II diabetics on their usual diet (blue and grey triangles), and after 5 weeks on a 55% carbohydrate (yellow circles) or 20% carbohydrate (blue circles) diet: The study in question describes these volunteers as having "mild, untreated diabetes." If 270 mg/dL of blood glucose is mild diabetes, I'd hate to see severe diabetes! In any case, the low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet brought blood glucose down to an acceptable level without requiring medication. It's interesting to note in the graph above that fasting blood glucose (18-24 hours) also fell dramatically. This could reflect improved insulin sensitivity in the liver. The liver pumps glucose into the bloodstream when it's necessary, and insulin suppresses this. When the liver is insulin resistant, it doesn't respond to the normal signal that there's already sufficient glucose, so it releases more and increases fasting blood glucose. When other tissues are insulin resistant, they don't take up the extra glucose, also contributing to the problem. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a measure of average blood glucose concentration over the preceding few weeks, also reflected a profound improvement in blood glucose levels in the low-carbohydrate group: At 5 weeks, the low-carbohydrate group was still improving and headed toward normal HbA1c, while the high-carbohydrate group remained at a dangerously high level. Total cholesterol, LDL and HDL remained unchanged in both groups, while triglycerides fell dramatically in the low-carbohydrate group. When glucose is poison, it's better to eat fat. Graph #1 was reproduced from Volek et al. (2005), which re-plotted data fr Continue reading >>

* What Is A Normal Blood Sugar?

* What Is A Normal Blood Sugar?

Normal blood sugars after a high carbohydrate breakfast eaten at 7:30 AM. The blue line is the average for the group. The brown lines show the range within which most readings fell (2 standard deviations). Bottom lines show Insulin and C-peptide levels at the same time. Click HERE if you don't see the graph. Graph is a screen shot from Dr. Christiansen's presentation cited below. The term "blood sugar" refers to the concentration of glucose, a simple, sugar, that is found in a set volume of blood. In the U.S. it is measured in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dl. In most of the rest of the world it is measured in millimoles per liter, abbreviated as mmol/L. The concentration of glucose in our blood changes continually throughout the day. It can even vary significantly from minute to minute. When you eat, it can rise dramatically. When you exercise it will often drop. The blood sugar measures that doctors are most interested in is the A1c, discussed below. When you are given a routine blood test doctors usually order a fasting glucose test. The most informative blood sugar reading is the post-meal blood sugar measured one and two hours after eating. Doctors rarely test this important blood sugar measurement as it is time consuming and hence expensive. Rarely doctors will order a Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, which tests your response to a huge dose of pure glucose, which hits your blood stream within minutes and produces results quite different from the blood sugars you will experience after each meal. Below you will find the normal readings for these various tests. Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Fasting blood sugar is usually measured first thing in the morning before you have eaten any food. A truly normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a norm Continue reading >>

Patterns Of Glycemia In Normal Pregnancy

Patterns Of Glycemia In Normal Pregnancy

Despite the well-known influence of maternal glucose on infant birth weight (BW), the prevalence of large for gestational age (LGA) infants (≥90th percentile for age) has been increasing steadily over decades, particularly in pregnancies complicated by pregestational or gestational diabetes mellitus (1). Although the overall prevalence of macrosomia (BW ≥4,000 g) is 17–29% in women with untreated gestational diabetes, the majority of macrosomic infants are born to women with obesity but no gestational diabetes (2,3). Moreover, epidemiologic data show that a higher BW is associated with higher BMI and glucose intolerance later in life (4,5), suggesting life-long metabolic implications for offspring. Recent data from the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes (HAPO) study suggested that concentrations of maternal glucose below the previously accepted diagnostic thresholds for gestational diabetes are predictive of LGA and fetal hyperinsulinemia (6). On the basis of this landmark study, the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommended new lower diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes (7,8). However, a significant number of women with gestational diabetes whose glucose values are within the current targeted therapeutic ranges deliver macrosomic infants (9). Although glucose plays a major role in fetal growth, this paradox underscores the likely role of other nutrients in fetal growth, but also the need to critically reexamine our definition of “normal” maternal patterns of glycemia and the effects on fetal growth. The new diagnostic criteria recommended by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group and ADA are expected to increase the prevalence of gestatio Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Curves In The Diagnosis & Regulation Of Diabetes In Cats

Blood Glucose Curves In The Diagnosis & Regulation Of Diabetes In Cats

A blood glucose profile (or curve) is a graph of blood glucose levels over time. It is the most effective way to determine the type, dose, and frequency of administration of insulin, necessary to keep the blood glucose at acceptable levels. Each cat responds very differently to insulin, and so the appropriate insulin therapy must be determined for each individual cat. In addition, a cat's insulin needs may change dramatically over time, so blood glucose profiles may need to be performed periodically for the lifetime of the cat. Blood glucose profiles are necessary because each cat reacts differently to the types of insulin, dosage, and intervals at which insulin is given. By performing a blood glucose profile, we can determine if an insulin was effective, when the peak effect occurred (i.e., when the glucose level was at its nadir (lowest point), how long the effect lasted, and the degree of fluctuation in the glucose level. Changes can then be made in the type of insulin, the dosage or the dosing intervals in order to maintain the blood glucose at the optimal level throughout a 24-hour period. In some cases, up to five or more blood glucose curves may need to be performed before a satisfactory regimen is determined. Because of the cost, abbreviated profiles (fewer samples) are sometimes used. In addition to the blood glucose profile, the response of the cat is noted. The amount the cat is eating, drinking, and urinating; activity level; and weight all help determine if the insulin regimen is effective. How is a blood glucose profile performed? To perform a blood glucose curve, a blood sample is taken to check the blood glucose level, the cat is fed and the insulin is administered. Additional blood samples are taken at regular intervals throughout the day to monitor the Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours

Normal Blood Sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours

Normal Blood sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours – Endocrine glands from the pancreas discharge the the body’s hormones insulin and glucagon. These testosterone control the blood sugar (glucose) levels in your body. Insulin helps bring about the move of blood glucose levels to body cells. The cells absorb the glucose on the blood as well as convert the item into power. Insufficient insulin production, or trouble in ingestion of blood sugar by cells can cause diabetes. Abnormal variations in blood sugar levels can lead to serious wellbeing complications. Related Keyword : Normal Blood Sugar Levels In Dogs, Normal Blood Sugar Levels For Diabetes Type 2 Chart and Normal Blood Sugar Levels For Juveniles. Related Image Of Normal Blood sugar Count | Normal Blood Sugar Graph 24 Hours Diabetes caused by severe lack of insulin is referred to as type 1 diabetes, and it truly is more prevalent in adults. It is surely an autoimmune problem. When body cells become resistant to insulin, the condition is known as type only two diabetes. As the actual cells build insulin level of resistance, blood sugar levels improve. Pancreas produces a lot more insulin to control the increased levels. But due to insulin weight, it becomes difficult to manage those ranges. Capacity with the pancreas to provide insulin is fixed and the high numbers of insulin made by the pancreas also appear to be insufficient to lower the blood glucose. High blood glucose levels are termed as hyperglycemia in addition to low blood glucose levels are referred to as hypoglycemia. Tests in order to Measure Blood sugar levels A uncomplicated blood test out helps measure how much sugar with blood. The number of sugar within blood, before in addition to after feeding on, is significantly different. So, norm Continue reading >>

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