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Non-invasive Blood Sugar Monitoring Device

Multisensor Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring System

Multisensor Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring System

A Thesis by Soumyashree Samadarsinee Bachelor of Technology, Siksha O Anusandhan (SOA) University, 2011 Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the faculty of the Graduate School of Wichita State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science All Rights Reserved MULTISENSOR NONINVASIVE BLOOD GLUCOSE MONITORING SYSTEM The following faculty members have examined the final copy of this thesis for form and content, and recommend that it be accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science with a major in Computer Networking. _______________________________________ Dr. Abu Asaduzzaman, Committee Chair _______________________________________ Dr. Deepak Gupta, Committee Member _______________________________________ Dr. Yi Song, Committee Member iii DEDICATION To the Almighty, my family for their ultimate encouragement throughout my education and for incomparable advice throughout my life and my gems Ishanee, Tisya, Adrisha, Swaraj, Swayum and Aayana who always find a way to cheer me up. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I am very thankful to my thesis advisor Dr. Abu Asaduzzaman for his continuous encouragement and support throughout my research work. His timely supervision of my work and guidance allowed this research work to be completed on time. He always had time and patience to guide me in accomplishing this work in spite of his busy schedule and offered me assistance from time to time. It has been an honor to work for him as a graduate research assistant. I express my sincere gratitude and thanks towards Dr. Deepak Gupta (Engineering Technology Program) and Dr. Yi Song (EECS Department) for taking time from their busy schedules and serve in my thesis committee. I take Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Towards A Wearable Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device

Towards A Wearable Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device

Towards a Wearable Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device Joseph Thomas Andrews1, J Solanki, Om P Choudhary, S Chouksey, N Malvia, P Chaturvedi and P Sen Published under licence by IOP Publishing Ltd National MEMS Design Centre, Applied Photonics Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Shri G S Institute of Technology & Science, Indore 452003 India Every day, about 150 Million people worldwide face the problem of diabetic metabolic control. Both the hypo- and hyper- glycaemic conditions of patients have fatal consequences and warrant blood glucose monitoring at regular interval. Existing blood glucose monitors can be widely classified into three classes viz., invasive, minimally invasive, and noninvasive. Invasive monitoring requires small volume of blood and are inappropriate for continuous monitoring of blood glucose. Minimally invasive monitors analyze tissue fluid or extract few micro litre of blood only. Also the skin injury is minimal. On the other hand, noninvasive devices are painless and void of any skin injury. We use an indigenously developed polarization sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography to measure the blood glucose levels. Current trends and recent results with the device are discussed. Gupta V, Khadgawat R, Saraswathy KN, Sachdeva MP and Kalla AK 2008 Int J Hum Genet 8 (1-2) 199 Continue reading >>

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

Imagine Living A Healthier Life With Glucowise™

We are developing a new non-invasive glucose monitor that will help you take control of your life. (Caution: GlucoWise is still under development and not available for public testing. If you are interested please use the "Get involved" signup form on this page. Due to the overwhelming demand we are unable to respond to individual emails - we are focused on getting the device to the market quickly). Glucowise™ is a non-invasive, 100% pain-free device that makes traditional blood sampling a thing of the past. Our unique sensor technology will allow you to monitor blood glucose levels without the need to pierce your skin. Simple yet highly reliable, Glucowise™ will exceed industry standards for self-monitoring blood glucose accuracy. You will be able to sample as often as you like and wherever you like, ensuring you avoid sudden hypoglycemic events. Our App and Smart Cloud technology delivers personalised advice and alerts, helping you to fully manage your condition. Intelligent analytics will use your current and historical data to calculate and forecast immediate trends in your blood glucose levels, allowing you to adjust your food or medication intake according to your activities or how you are feeling. Glucowise™ will offer unlimited testing without the need for costly consumables, so you can test as often as you like without having to worry about the cost or pain. The compact design will offer you high levels of privacy. It will take no more than 10 seconds to provide a simple, fast and highly discrete testing experience – anytime, anywhere. The data can then sent wirelessly and securely to your smartphone or tablet. Take control There are many situations whereby conventional testing is challenging. Often people with diabetes will unnecessarily expose themselv Continue reading >>

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Diabetes patients know that one of the greatest challenges in managing the ailment is tracking their blood sugar, or glucose, levels. To do that the only option available today is through the use of standard glucose meters — devices that require multiple finger pricks each day, a painful process. For years, researchers have been trying to find a noninvasive, quicker and easier way to monitor blood glucose. Even the most advanced devices in use today, like needle sensors, which can track glucose continuously, need to be inserted under the skin every one to two weeks. Free Sign Up Now, Caesarea-based startup Cnoga Medical Ltd. says it has come up with a way to track blood glucose levels without pricking or pain. Its glucose meter, already approved for use in numerous countries worldwide, uses a camera to provide a diagnosis of blood glucose levels by observing the changing colors of the user’s finger. During a short training period, the device learns to correlate the user’s skin tone with previous glucose level readings. The technology got the green light on Monday from one of the world’s leading diabetes specialists, Prof. Andreas Pfützner, MD, PhD, who came to Israel to present the company with his findings after having tested the technology in two clinical studies in Germany. “The results were surprising,” he told The Times of Israel in a phone interview. Pfützner held two clinical trials at his institute to validate the performance of the technology, and in both studies he found that the medical device performed “with a surprising level of accuracy,” the same as that of needle sensors. “Cnoga achieved the same level of monitoring as the invasive devices,” he said. “I have not seen this before,” he said. “It is a wonderful device” and a Continue reading >>

Skin-like Biosensor Offers Needle-free Blood Sugar Monitoring

Skin-like Biosensor Offers Needle-free Blood Sugar Monitoring

For people with diabetes, the need to prick fingertips with a lancet every few hours is now over. The advent of sensors for continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) means that patients can read their blood sugar levels in real-time, without the pain and hassles of repeated finger sticks. The latest CGM device, approved in September, doesn’t even require a finger stick for calibration, as other technologies do. But all existing systems are still invasive, expensive and unsightly—involving a clearly visible sensor worn on the arm or abdomen with a tiny needle that enters the skin. And what the community really needs, says Daniel Finan, a research director at JDRF, the non-profit organization formerly known as the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, is a glucose tester that’s cheap, accurate, non-invasive and inconspicuous. Enter the new skin-like biosensor system reported today in the journal Science Advances. It involves first attaching a paper battery to the skin surface to create an electrochemical gradient in the tissue below. The wearer then applies hyaluronic acid—a common ingredient in skin-care products—to the battery’s anode, which pushes the positively charged molecule into the subcutaneous fluid. This changes the osmotic pressure encountered by the blood vessels that run through the skin, causing them to release more glucose that flows to the battery’s cathode at the skin surface. After 20 minutes, the battery is then removed and the biosensor stuck on. It might look like just a tiny square of gold foil, but packed into the gossamer-thin film are five different layers that help convert the sugar molecules into electrical signals that can be read by standard laboratory equipment—or perhaps one day by a small and wearable circuit board. The manufact Continue reading >>

Diamontech And The Development Of Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

Diamontech And The Development Of Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring

DiaMonTech and the development of non-invasive blood glucose monitoring DiaMonTech and the development of non-invasive blood glucose monitoring Professor Werner Mntele has considerable experience as a physicist and a physical chemist, and is now Head of Research and Development for DiaMonTech, which has developed technology to revolutionise monitoring glucose levels for diabetics, using molecular spectroscopy the study of the absorption of light by molecules. Mntele has a broad history in analytics and medical issues, in particular molecular analytics. For the past 40 years there has been work on molecular spectroscopy, which he is now using to benefit diabetes patients by offering a non-invasive way to keep track of glucose levels. Diabetes is not only becoming a wider issue among the worlds population, but billions every year are being spent on controlling the disease. According to a study by BCC Research, the global market for diabetes therapeutics and diagnostics was valued at $110bn in 2011 and was set to reach $118.7bn the following year. 2017s market value was expected to reach nearly $157bn after increasing at a five-year CAGR of 5.7%. Grand View Research has also predicted that the global market for devices alone that is, diagnostic, monitoring and insulin delivery products will reach $35.5bn by 2024. Grand View cited major drivers of the market as the growing number of diabetic patients owing to sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy food habits. The report also stated that the growing demand for advances and minimally invasive diagnostic, as well as monitoring, devices is expected to propel the market growth. Theres certainly a demand for a new type of diagnostic product, since Grand View has found that in 2015, the test-strips sub-segment captured the largest m Continue reading >>

A Truly Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Device That May Improve Diabetes Management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Prediabetes

A Truly Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Device That May Improve Diabetes Management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Or Prediabetes

WILMINGTON, Del. and ASHDOD, Israel, Sept. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Integrity Applications, Inc. (OTCQB: IGAP), innovator of GlucoTrack®, a non-invasive device for measuring glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes, presents Data Demonstrating that the performance of GlucoTrack is comparable among patients with prediabetes, newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and long duration of type 2 diabetes, at the 53rd EASD Annual Meeting in Lisbon, Portugal. The study evaluated the performance of GlucoTrack, a non-invasive glucose monitoring device, in all diabetes populations: patients with prediabetes (N=7), newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes (diabetes duration ≤ 5 years; N=9) and individuals with a long-duration of type 2 diabetes (diabetes duration >5 years; N=16). All participants underwent a calibration day and a trial day that included a pre-prandial measurement and a standardized breakfast followed by six additional measurements over 30-minute intervals. In all groups, 100% of the measurements were in the clinically acceptable A and B zones of the Consensus error grid, with more than 92.5% in the clinically accurate zone A. Mean and median absolute relative difference (ARD) values ranged from 15.6% to 18.3% and from 12.7% to 13.9%, respectively. "The finding of comparable clinical and numerical accuracies across all groups indicates that the device is suitable for people with long and short durations of type 2 diabetes as well as for people with prediabetes, signifying that many patients worldwide may benefit from GlucoTrack," says Dr. Tamar Lin, Lead Research Scientist at Integrity Applications. Non-invasive glucose monitoring devices for home use aim to overcome the barriers of current invasive glucose monitoring methods by offering a simple, painless and Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

FDA approves first blood sugar monitor without finger pricks The FDA has approved a device from Abbott that continuously monitors diabetics’ blood sugar levels without requiring backup finger prick tests. .S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System , approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. Sign up for our Morning Rounds newsletter But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for ad Continue reading >>

(pdf) A Portable Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Device

(pdf) A Portable Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Device

All content in this area was uploaded by Mitra Mohd Addi on Sep 29, 2016 Abstract Diabetes is known as one of the life threatening diseases in the world that occurs not only among adults and elderly, but also among infants and children. Blood glucose measurements are essential for diabetes patients to determine their insulin dose intake and continuous monitoring is vital to ensure that glucose level is always within the normal range. The commonly used methods to measure glucose level in blood are invasive which are high in accuracy but are usually painful and has higher risk of infections. As an alternative, non-invasive techniques are introduced to develop pain free glucose measuring methods. In this paper, a portable non-invasive blood glucose monitoring device is developed using near infrared sensors. Besides being able to detect glucose concentration in blood, the device is also able to display the glucose level and the required insulin dose, corresponding to the body mass index (BMI) of the user. Several in vitro and in vivo experiments proved the reliability of the device. Results of the experiments proved that the device is reliable in glucose detection with 4% - 16% accuracy compared to the common Diabetes Mellitus is one of the common life threatening diseases in the world. Malaysia is ranked 10th in the world with the highest number of population with diabetes (World Health Organization, (WHO), 2013). The number prevalence increases every year due to the changes of humans lifestyles. The main cause of diabetes mellitus is still unrevealed, but it is closely related to body weight, gender, diet, genetic and physical activities[1]. There are many known factors that can develop complications in diabetic patients The effects of diabetes can only be seen between s Continue reading >>

Prospects And Limitations Of Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Using Near-infrared Spectroscopy

Prospects And Limitations Of Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Using Near-infrared Spectroscopy

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder which can lead to severe complications and affect all vital organs. The occurrence of complications due to diabetes can be prevented by regular monitoring and maintaining the blood glucose level in the normal range. Most of the commercially available devices for glucose measurement are invasive or minimally invasive. Invasive devices used for blood glucose monitoring are inconvenient and painful whereas minimal invasive devices have limited time span and stability. Thus, there is a need of an economic, compact, painless and convenient non-invasive device which can promote frequent blood testing which help in control of blood glucose level. In this paper various methods of glucose monitoring are reviewed and overall emphasis is laid on the development of NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy) based non-invasive glucose monitoring. The motivation of this review is to demonstrate the prospects, limitations and technical challenges for development of NIRS based non-invasive blood glucose measurement system. Continue reading >>

Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring For Diabetes: Five Strategies Under Development

Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring For Diabetes: Five Strategies Under Development

People with diabetes must regularly check their blood glucose levels to know how much medication to use, or to keep track of fluctuating levels. This monitoring is generally done at home using a finger prick blood test. Although accurate, this test can be messy and inconvenient, and there are concerns that many patients are not testing themselves as frequently as they should. A simple, pain-free, non-invasive method would mark a major improvement in diabetes care. Various companies and research groups are working on methods to detect glucose levels in other bodily fluids. Nearly four million people in the UK have been diagnosed with diabetes — about 10% with type 1, and the rest with type 2. Worldwide, about 415 million adults are living with diabetes, according to the International Diabetes Federation. People with type 1 diabetes may be advised to test their blood-sugar levels four to eight times a day; with type 2 diabetes, the recommended frequency of testing varies, but it may be once a day or more. The first blood glucose monitors came to market in the 1970s. Since then, while there have been improvements in the technology, “we’ve not had any successful alternative provided at all”, notes Richard Guy, a pharmaceutical scientist at the University of Bath. A number of barriers exist to self-testing using current methods. “The reasons [people] don’t do it are that it’s painful, it’s messy, it’s often inconvenient, because of whatever situation they happen to be in, or perhaps they feel intimidated about doing it,” says Guy. “Whenever you talk to diabetics, particularly type 1s who have had it for years and really need to test themselves frequently, they are desperate to find an alternative that is discreet and doesn’t involve all the parapherna Continue reading >>

Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device For People With Diabetes In Development

Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device For People With Diabetes In Development

Noninvasive Blood Glucose Monitoring Device For People With Diabetes In Development Novel breathalyzer offers alternative to finger stick testing for people with type 1 and 2 diabetes People with diabetes are one step closer to more easily checking their blood glucose levels with a non-invasive device for detecting and monitoring blood glucose levels, which is currently in development. The hand-held breathalyzer device detects acetone, which has been linked to high blood glucose levels in the breath. The research is being presented at the 2016 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Annual Meeting and Exposition, the world's largest pharmaceutical sciences meeting. The meeting is taking place in Denver Nov. 13-17. Although testing technology has improved in recent decades, with the finger stick testing, as many as 67 percent of people with diabetes may not comply because it is invasive and somewhat painful. Yet, lack of blood-glucose monitoring can result in serious diabetes-related complications. For example, if a person's blood glucose is too low, complications can include seizures, loss of consciousness, and even death. If a person's blood glucose is too high, complications can include infections, cardiovascular disease and nerve and kidney damage. "We believe this technology will be a great improvement in the lives of people with diabetes," said Priefer. "It is the first non-invasive medical device for detecting and monitoring diabetes by connecting one's acetone levels with their blood glucose. We believe it is a necessary alternative to the finger-prick approach for people living with type 1 and type 2 diabetes." Ronny Priefer, Ph.D. and his colleague, Michael Rust, Ph.D., both out of Western New England University in Springfield, Mass., have dev Continue reading >>

Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using A Multisensor-based Glucometer And Time Series Analysis

Noninvasive Continuous Glucose Monitoring Using A Multisensor-based Glucometer And Time Series Analysis

To evaluate the ability of noninvasive continuous glucose monitoring, the continuous glucose profiles were obtained by the multisensor-based glucometer. In total, three volunteers with diabetes, each of them accepting to participate in five experiments, and six healthy volunteers, each of them accepting to participate in three lunch experiments, were recruited. The reference glucose profiles were measured either by dynamic glucometer (for volunteers with diabetes) or finger stick (for healthy volunteers). For each volunteer, one group of experimental data was selected for modelling, while the remaining groups of data were used for estimation. There were three groups of modelling and six groups of estimations for each healthy volunteer, as shown in Fig. 1(a), in which the grey background figures are modelling results, and the white background figures are estimated glucose results. For each volunteer with diabetes, there are 5 groups of modelling and 20 groups of estimations, as shown in Fig. 1(b). Experiment results of (a) healthy volunteer 1 and (b) diabetes volunteer 1. N-Value is the normalized glucose value. For each row, the grey background figures are modelling results, and the white background figures are estimated glucose results. The estimation value is the noninvasive measured glucose profile, the reference value is the reference glucose profile. Full size image For all estimated glucose profiles, we calculated the correlation coefficient, NRMSE (normalized root mean squared error) and MAPE (mean absolute percent error) of each estimation result. NRMSE and MAPE were as follows: where Glu(t) was the real glucose value, G(t) was the estimation glucose value and N is the number of test points. The average results for each volunteer are shown in Table 1. From the t Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitor: 5 Similar Technologies In Development

Fda Approves Non-invasive Blood Glucose Monitor: 5 Similar Technologies In Development

FDA Approves Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Monitor: 5 Similar Technologies In Development A laser device for testing blood sugar without pricking a finger is under development at the University of Leeds. Pictured: A medical staffer takes a blood sample from a diabetes patient. Photo: Reuters Pricking fingers to draw out blood for testing their blood sugar, is a painful inconvenience that diabetics have to go through, throughout their lifetimes. But, there are many solutions being worked upon to make this process non-invasive. FDA on Wednesday approved the first continuous glucose level monitoring system for adults the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring system works by just inserting a tiny sensor wire below the surface of the skin. This sensor continuously measures and monitors glucose levels. Users can get this data by just waving a wireless mobile reader over the sensor wire. The apparatus will take 12 hours to rev up, but once it does, it will provide continuous glucose monitoring. You will need a doctors help in activating it. Once it is activated though, the mobile reader will be able to tell you whether your sugar levels are too low or too high. Furthermore, you will also have to be 18 or older to use it. This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of finger stick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes with a wave of the mobile reader, Donald St. Pierre,acting director of the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health and deputy director of new product evaluation in the FDAs Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in the press release issued Wednesday. There are around 29 million people with diabetes in the U.S. and their numbers are increas Continue reading >>

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