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No Prick Glucose Meter

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

No More Finger Prick. New Technology May Help With Diabetes Management.

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes technology and medications have come a long way since the invention of insulin in 1921. But day-to-day management still requires countless finger pricks to draw blood and measure glucose levels. FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, manufactured by Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. and officially approved on September 27 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), strives to be a true game-changer for people with diabetes. Unlike the Dexcom or Medtronic’s Guardian and Enlite continuous glucose monitors (CGM), which require a minimum of twice-daily finger pricks to calibrate the CGM’s readings with that of a traditional blood glucometer, the Libre system requires zero calibration. The technology is still similar in that the Libre also uses a small sensor wire that a patient inserts into their subcutaneous tissue. This sensor measures glucose levels in the interstitial (body fat) fluid versus glucose in the bloodstream. How the device works Where the technology continues to differ greatly is in how the glucose levels measured by the sensor wire are then reported to the person using it. From the get-go, the Libre requires a lengthy 12-hour startup period before the sensor is able to measure and report glucose levels while the Dexcom and Medtronic sensors startup window is a mere two hours. The most significant difference between these technologies is that the Libre isn’t “continuous.” When a patient wants to measure their blood glucose level, the Libre requires them to wave a small handheld “mobile reader” over the part of the body where their sensor is located. The handheld device then displays the glucose level, allowing the user to determine if it’s too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Dexcom and Medtronic Continue reading >>

The Fda Just Approved A Device That Can Monitor Blood Sugar Without Finger Pricks

The Fda Just Approved A Device That Can Monitor Blood Sugar Without Finger Pricks

Abbott's device continuously monitors blood sugar levels.Abbott The FDA on Wednesday approved a device that monitors blood sugar levels without needing to draw blood via a finger prick. The device, which is made by Abbott and called the "FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System," continuously monitors a person's glucose level via a sensor that's stuck on the body. It's the first device of its kind that doesn't require users to calibrate the system with a traditional finger-prick blood draw twice a day. "This system allows people with diabetes to avoid the additional step of fingerstick calibration, which can sometimes be painful, but still provides necessary information for treating their diabetes—with a wave of the mobile reader," the FDA's Donald St. Pierre said in a news release. For people living with diabetes, checking blood sugar levels with a drop of blood from the finger is a common practice. Diabetes is a condition in which people have a hard time processing sugar, which can lead to complications if those levels get too high or drop too low. Continuous monitoring lets you see not only when blood sugar is too high or too low, but also whether it is rising or falling. According to a review of literature by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, testing blood sugar more frequently tends to be related to better blood sugar control. Abbott's competitor Dexcom, which still requires the finger sticks for calibrating its device, was down 34% on the news Thursday. "The clear loser in the FDA’s decision is Dexcom," Jefferies analyst Raj Denhoy said in a note Wednesday. That's because on paper, Abbott's device looks better since it doesn't require finger pricks, has better accuracy, and is cheaper. "We believe we've got something here that's rev Continue reading >>

A Diabetes Monitor That Spares The Fingers

A Diabetes Monitor That Spares The Fingers

For the past year and a half I’ve been buying a medical device from Italy that has improved my life immeasurably. It wasn’t easy: I roped in a good friend who had moved to Milan to buy the device and ship it to me because it wasn’t yet available in the States. And it was expensive: over $1,600 a year. But my black-market purchase helps me manage my Type 1 diabetes without the need to draw blood from my callused fingers 10-plus times a day to track my glucose level, a ritual that had been an unpleasant part of my life for decades. The FreeStyle Libre, made by Abbott, is a flash glucose sensor that allows people with diabetes to view our blood sugar every minute of the day without a single finger prick. While there are similar devices on the market — called continuous glucose monitors, or CGMs — the Libre is the least invasive one I’ve seen. It takes readings from a sensor under the skin but doesn’t require finger sticks for calibration, and is about the size of a quarter and as thick as two. And it’s helping me keep my diabetes under better control. There have been some challenges: The Milanese UPS store wanted a letter detailing exactly what was in the box. My credit card’s fraud department called (“Yes, the charge for $365 from Milan is mine”). So I was thrilled to learn that the Food and Drug Administration recently approved the sale of the Libre in the United States, a decision that may help some of the 29 million Americans with diabetes. The Libre I buy from Italy has a self-adhesive, waterproof white sensor that sticks to my arm for 14 days. It took some trial and error to get used to it. One sensor flipped off from over-aggressive toweling at the gym; another came loose after a backpack strap nicked it. Finally, rather than the spot on my out Continue reading >>

No More Finger Prick- A New Technology To Check Daily Glucose Levels

No More Finger Prick- A New Technology To Check Daily Glucose Levels

No More Finger Prick- A New Technology To Check Daily Glucose Levels Diabetes is one of the highly prevalent diseases. It is not just dominant in the USA but the whole world is affected by it. Regarding the management of diabetes, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes medication and administration is a vast topic of discussion. Ever since the invention of insulin in 1921, the debate has taken so many turns till the date. For checking the sugar levels daily, blood test through laboratory is not recommended. It is not feasible to check the blood sugar level by every now and then. RELATED: What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes Insipidus? The latest equipment of disease management includes diabetes management too. A device that is helpful to draw blood and check the sugar level is the self-monitoring blood glucose-measuring device. It pricks the finger and tells you the glucose level. Unfortunately, the day-to-day management still needs more advancement. The multiple pricks each day; every day is not a comfortable option. There is one new device, which is recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The new game-changing device is none other than FreeStyle Libre Glucose Monitoring System, which is manufactured by Abbot Diabetic Care Inc. It has been considered safe for human use recently. RELATED: A Rapid Increase In Diabetes Linked Cancer Is An Alarming Situation Unlike most of the glucose monitoring systems, which you need to check twice a day by pricking the finger, the Libre system works differently. It doesnt require pricking your finger at all. Instead of pricking, the Libre uses a small sensor wire, which the user is required to insert into the subcutaneous tissue. You may be wondering that how can this sensor wire measure glucose from blood when it is only Continue reading >>

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

The Fda Has Approved A Blood Sugar Monitor That Doesn’t Require A Finger Prick

Further proof the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been warming up to modern technology — it has just approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor that doesn’t require the user to prick themselves over and over for a blood sample. Today, the FDA cleared Abbot’s FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, a device that uses a small sensor wire inserted under the skin to determine glucose levels in adult diabetics. Another wand-like device is then waved over the sensor to measure and give a readout of those glucose levels. This is a milestone move for the FDA as diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States who currently have to test their blood sugar by pricking themselves several times throughout the day and every time they eat. However, the idea for a prickless blood sugar monitor isn’t new. Tech companies have increasingly shown an interest in the massive diabetics market over the past few years. Apple is rumored to be working on such a device and its CEO Tim Cook has even been spotted wearing a possible prototype that could connect to the Apple Watch. Other companies endeavor to build something similar, including Glucowise, which has a device still under development. However, it seems it’s not so easy to create a needleless blood sugar detector. Google tried to build a contact lens that could detect glucose but it seems the project has gone nowhere since drug company Novartis licensed the tech in 2014. Another FDA-approved device for glucose monitoring without the prick called the GlucoWatch was approved in the early 2000’s, but consumers found it cumbersome and it happened to cause a bad rash in some. But there’s new hope today that the Freestyle monitor has worked out all the kinks. The device is intended for those 18 a Continue reading >>

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Israeli Device Banishes Finger-pricking For Sugar Levels In Diabetes Patients

Diabetes patients know that one of the greatest challenges in managing the ailment is tracking their blood sugar, or glucose, levels. To do that the only option available today is through the use of standard glucose meters — devices that require multiple finger pricks each day, a painful process. For years, researchers have been trying to find a noninvasive, quicker and easier way to monitor blood glucose. Even the most advanced devices in use today, like needle sensors, which can track glucose continuously, need to be inserted under the skin every one to two weeks. Free Sign Up Now, Caesarea-based startup Cnoga Medical Ltd. says it has come up with a way to track blood glucose levels without pricking or pain. Its glucose meter, already approved for use in numerous countries worldwide, uses a camera to provide a diagnosis of blood glucose levels by observing the changing colors of the user’s finger. During a short training period, the device learns to correlate the user’s skin tone with previous glucose level readings. The technology got the green light on Monday from one of the world’s leading diabetes specialists, Prof. Andreas Pfützner, MD, PhD, who came to Israel to present the company with his findings after having tested the technology in two clinical studies in Germany. “The results were surprising,” he told The Times of Israel in a phone interview. Pfützner held two clinical trials at his institute to validate the performance of the technology, and in both studies he found that the medical device performed “with a surprising level of accuracy,” the same as that of needle sensors. “Cnoga achieved the same level of monitoring as the invasive devices,” he said. “I have not seen this before,” he said. “It is a wonderful device” and a Continue reading >>

Laser Device Detects Blood Glucose Levels Without The Finger-prick

Laser Device Detects Blood Glucose Levels Without The Finger-prick

2 pictures Finger-prick tests to monitor blood glucose levels can be the bane of a diabetic's life. In a move that could put an end to such tests in the future, researchers at Princeton University have developed a non-invasive way to test blood glucose levels using a laser. Like a number of other blood glucose measuring research efforts we've seen in recent years, such as carbon nanotube "tattoos" and biochips that measure glucose in saliva, the Princeton team's method doesn't require direct analysis of a blood sample. Instead, the new approach detects the level of blood sugar by directing a specialized laser at a person's palm and measuring the amount of absorption by the sugar molecules in the person's body. Rather than the person's blood, the laser targets dermal interstitial fluid, which has a strong correlation with blood sugar. Instead of near-infrared light, which is used by many medical devices, the Princeton team's method uses mid-infrared light. This is because although near infrared light is not blocked by water, making it suitable for use in the human body, it interacts with a number of acids and chemicals in the skin, making it unsuitable for detecting blood sugar. However, the use of mid-infrared light presents its own problems – it is difficult to harness with standard lasers and requires relatively high power and stability to penetrate the skin and scatter off bodily fluid. The researchers found the answer in the form of a new type of device particularly capable of producing mid-infrared light called a quantum cascade laser. Quantum cascade lasers boast the ability to produce one of a number of frequencies by passing electrons through a "cascade" of semiconductor layers. Recent developments have also provided increased power and stability, allowing the Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Abbott’s Continuous Glucose Monitoring System, Moving Beyond Painful Finger Pricks

Fda Approves Abbott’s Continuous Glucose Monitoring System, Moving Beyond Painful Finger Pricks

In a milestone for diabetes management, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave a green light to Abbott’s FreeStyle Libre Flash continuous glucose monitoring system that doesn’t require painful pricks with finger sticks. Instead of people having to prick their fingers to get a blood sample for readings, the device uses a small sensor wire inserted below the skin’s surface that continuously measures and monitors glucose levels, according to an Abbott news release. Users get their blood glucose reading by waving a mobile reader above the sensor wire. Once users complete a 12-hour start-up period, the device can be worn for up to 10 days. Users can get a sense of their shifting blood glucose levels on a daily basis through Abbott’s Ambulatory Glucose Profile. It can help guide users concerned about veering too closely towards low blood sugar or high blood sugar. Although the system has been available in 40 countries, it has not yet been available in the U.S. FreeStyle Libre will be available in pharmacies by the end of the year, the news release said. A Bloomberg report cited analysts from Jefferies who called the approval a game changer. The news also undercut DexCom’s share price which fell 16 percent yesterday, as Abbott’s inched up by more than 3 percent, according to the article. “People don’t want to prick their fingers,” Jefferies analyst Raj Denhoy told Bloomberg. “They’re willing to give up some level of accuracy for the ease of the device.” Although DexCom actually was the first to get FDA approval for a continuous glucose monitor with its G5 model last year, it still required finger sticks to calibrate the device. The approval also has implications for Abbott’s deal with Bigfoot Medical. The agreement will integrate Abbott’s CGM te Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

Diabetics Can Now Test Their Blood Sugar Levels With A Mobile Device

People living with diabetes have to prick their fingers to check their blood sugar levels anywhere from one to seven times a day. But now, there’s a better way to monitor blood sugar. This week, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the first at-home, needleless system for continuously monitoring glucose for people with diabetes. The system, called FreeStyle Libre Flash, and manufactured by the DC-based Abbott Laboratories, allows users to forgo finger-pricking for up to 10 days at a time. The Flash is essentially a small, circular plastic sensor that sits on top of the skin and detects blood sugar from a small wire that goes under the skin beneath the sensor. People can insert themselves using an applicator that works sort of like a rubber stamp. Once people have applied the sensor on their arms, they can wave a mobile device a little smaller than a smartphone in front of it to read glucose levels. It takes about 12 hours for the wire to become adjusted to the person’s body, but afterward the device takes continuous data that tracks blood sugar over time for over a week. Afterward, you peel the sensor off slowly, and apply a new one. Ideally, this would encourage people with diabetes to check their blood sugar more routinely, Jared Watkin, senior vice president of Abbott’s Diabetes Care unit, told Reuters. Often, people will forgo checking their sugar levels as often as they should because finger pricking can be such a nuisance. Right now it’s only marketed for adults, but the company hopes to receive approval for children under 18 as well. Abbott already has one needle-free blood sugar monitoring system available for the public called the FreeStyle Libre Pro. However, users have to make a special trip to the doctor’s office to have the wire placed und Continue reading >>

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

Test Your Glucose Level Without Drawing Blood

People with diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance are advised to spot-check their blood-glucose levels several times daily to reduce the risk of serious complications. That’s a lot of finger-pricking, considering that about 700 million people fall into one of those categories. The Israeli company Integrity Applications put more than a decade into developing GlucoTrack, described as the first truly noninvasive system for self-monitoring glucose levels. Instead of drawing blood, you clip the GlucoTrack sensor to your earlobe. A patented combination of ultrasonic, electromagnetic and thermal technologies works with a proprietary algorithm to measure physiological parameters correlated with glucose level. Results are displayed within about a minute on a USB-connected handheld control unit, which also stores and compares previous readings. The number is announced verbally, facilitating use by elderly and vision-impaired people with diabetes or pre-diabetes. Sales in parts of Europe, South America, Australia and New Zealand began in 2016, after the newest version of the device won regulatory approval in Europe and in South Korea. Integrity is soon beginning clinical trials of GlucoTrack Model DF-F in the United States required for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, and is working toward approval in China. The “DF” stands for David Freger, the late Israeli physicist who envisioned a novel noninvasive glucose monitor. His colleagues Avner Gal and David Malka helped him turn it into reality. “David passed away from diabetes complications at age 48 in 2004, and we called our device models DF to memorialize him,” Gal tells ISRAEL21c. Three technologies The trio’s research revealed several attempts to invent a noninvasive blood-glucose monitor using optic Continue reading >>

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Diabetes System Continuously Checks Glucose Without A Finger Prick

Thanks to a system developed by Dexcom, a developer of technology for diabetes, diabetics won’t need to prick their fingers anymore to check their glucose levels. The Dexcom G5 is a glucose monitoring system that uses a sensor, a transmitter, and the user’s smartphone to continuously monitor the user’s glucose levels. “The Dexcom G5 Mobile system is the only continuous glucose monitor that the FDA has approved to replace finger stick blood glucose measurements when making diabetes treatment decisions,” says Jake Leach, senior vice president of research and development at Dexcom. A hair-like, stainless steel needle is inserted into the abdomen and releases the sensor, a flexible, metal wire with proprietary embedded membranes. After insertion, the needle is removed while the sensor is left behind. “These membranes are highly biocompatible and include glucose oxidase enzyme technology, which allows the sensor to accurately measure glucose” Leach says. "It undergoes testing to ensure biocompatibility." The coding also manages the amount of glucose that goes to the sensor enzyme, allowing consistency with the amount of glucose being transported. The sensor is connected to a thin, patch-like transmitter with two electrodes that use a 12-amp signal. As soon as the transmitter snaps with the sensor, it begins to function. The sensor comes out when the patch is removed. The transmitter is similar to a shell, designed with a polymer resin using a custom molding process. It was designed without a seal so it cannot be opened, which keeps it waterproof. Since the transmitter is not disposable, the batteries, two silver oxide coin cells, cannot be replaced. The transmitter, which runs on low power to ensure only its frequency is picked up, should be replaced after thre Continue reading >>

New No Finger-prick Glucose Monitor Approved By Fda For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetics

New No Finger-prick Glucose Monitor Approved By Fda For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetics

Most people live a life full of expectations, tasks, day to day activities and functions needed to meet our ambitions, dreams and financial goals. These activities and tasks require a lot of energy to do them efficiently and correctly. Every part of our body needs the energy to function effectively. This energy comes from glucose, which is gotten from the breakdown of foods we eat every day. Now there is a new no finger-prick glucose monitor approved by FDA for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics. Glucose is vital for the body to grow well and efficiently function. Glucose can be derived from processed foods such as carbohydrates, and from glycogenolysis by the liver when the body is low on glucose. The liver commences a process called glycogenolysis to supply the body with glucose. When there is too much glucose in the body, it is reduced by a hormone called insulin. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease characterized by hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) over an extended period. The excessive glucose can be due to reduced insulin or the cells of the body not responding to this insulin. Insulin is the hormone responsible for controlling the glucose level of the body. This insulin hormone is produced by an organ called the pancreas. Types of Diabetes Diabetes type 1: This is the kind of diabetes that occurs as a result of reduced insulin. It is also termed insulin dependent diabetes mellitus(IDDM) because the etiology is due to reduced insulin production by the pancreas. It is common in younger people and called juvenile diabetes. The reason for the reduced production of insulin by the pancreas in unknown. When the insulin production is reducing, the decreasing glucose function of the body is impaired leading to hyperglycemia. Diabetes type 2: in this kind of diabetes, the i Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Pricks

FDA approves first blood sugar monitor without finger pricks The FDA has approved a device from Abbott that continuously monitors diabetics’ blood sugar levels without requiring backup finger prick tests. .S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn’t need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott’s new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System , approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. Sign up for our Morning Rounds newsletter But most don’t do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. “We’re able to lower blood sugar safely” with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott’s device was approved for ad Continue reading >>

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

Fda Approves First Blood Sugar Monitor Without Finger Prick

U.S. regulators have approved the first continuous blood sugar monitor for diabetics that doesn't need backup finger prick tests. Current models require users to test a drop of blood twice daily to calibrate, or adjust, the monitor. The pain of finger sticks and the cost of testing supplies discourage many people from keeping close tabs on their blood sugar, which is needed to manage insulin use and adjust what they eat. Abbott's new FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, approved Wednesday by the Food and Drug Administration, uses a small sensor attached to the upper arm. Patients wave a reader device over it to see the current blood sugar level and changes over the past eight hours. Most of the 30 million Americans with diabetes use standard glucose meters, which require multiple finger pricks each day and only show current sugar level. More-accurate continuous glucose monitoring devices are used by about 345,000 Americans. But most don't do the finger pricks to calibrate them and may get inaccurate readings, said Dr. Timothy Bailey, who helped test FreeStyle Libre. "We're able to lower blood sugar safely" with this technology, said Bailey, director of the Advanced Metabolic Care and Research Institute in California. He receives consulting fees from various diabetes device makers. Too-high blood sugar levels can damage organs and lead to heart attacks, strokes, blindness and amputations. Very low blood sugar can cause seizures, confusion and loss of consciousness. Abbott's device was approved for adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and should be available in pharmacies within months. The company, based near Chicago, did not disclose the price of the reader or the sensors. Abbott's system can't be used with an insulin pump, a device worn against the skin th Continue reading >>

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