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My Fasting Blood Sugar Is 111 Mg/dl

Blood Sugar Converter

Blood Sugar Converter

Tweet Convert blood sugar/glucose from mmol/L (UK standard) to mg/dL (US standard) and vice versa using our blood sugar converter. Whats the difference between mmol/L and mg/dL? Both sets of units are used to measure blood sugar levels and both give a measurement of the concentration of glucose in the blood, albeit in slightly different ways. mmol/L gives the molarity, which is the number of molecules of a substance within a specified volume, in this case within 1 litre. mg/dL gives the concentration by the ratio of weight to volume, in this case milligrams per decilitre. mmol/L is the most common measurement used in the UK with mg/dL predominantly used in the USA and continental Europe. Blood glucose typically varies from 4 mmol/L to 6 mmol/L for people without diabetes. Blood sugar (also called blood glucose) needs to be tightly controlled in the human body to minimise the risk of complications developing. Formula to calculate mmol/l from mg/dl: mmol/l = mg/dl / 18 Formula to calculate mg/dl from mmol/l: mg/dl = 18 × mmol/l Can I change the units given by my blood glucose meter? This can depend on which blood glucose meter you have. Some meters allow you to change the units from mg/dL to mmol/L and vice versa whether some meters are only set up to display one set of units. Check the meter’s manual for whether it is possible to change the units. If you don’t have or cannot find the manual, contact the manufacturer. Why are blood sugar levels important? Measuring blood sugar levels and understanding what your glucose levels should be is an essential part of diabetes treatment for many people with diabetes. Blood sugar level refers to the total amount of glucose circulating in the blood. In different parts of the world, different units for measuring blood glucose ar Continue reading >>

My Blood Sugar Is 111, Is That Ok?

My Blood Sugar Is 111, Is That Ok?

Yes. 111 mg/dl as your blood glucose level is safe. It is classed as being towards the top end of the normal range of blood sugar but it isn't cause for concern. A blood glucose level, which can also be referred to as blood sugar concentration level, is the amount of sugar found in the blood. The body naturally regulates this, but in some cases it falters. Glucose is absorbed by organs in the body courtesy of insulin. If the body stops producing this insulin, the blood sugar level will continue to rise to unsafe levels. The result is the need for regular insulin injections and a careful monitoring of blood sugar levels. Generally anything between 80 and 120 mg/dl is considered acceptable. If you creep over 120, it's cause for concern but it could be just a fluctuation. 126 is the rule of thumb for seeking medical advice, either by seeing a physician or visiting a clinic. A false reading can be given after a meal though. In some cases a person can reach 130 or even 140 mg/dl and be perfectly fine. If you are fasting, during a religious festival such as Ramadan for example, and have a higher than normal blood sugar level despite this lack of food then you should be concerned. Again, the rule of thumb of 126 mg/dl applies here. If in the high end of the normal range you may have pre-diabetes, but if exceeding this you may have diabetes. Symptoms of a problem include being overly thirsty or urinating excessively, unusual weight loss, exaggerated hunger and in cases blurred vision and an increase in infections. Blurtit's advice should be augmented with the consultation of a professional medical. Continue reading >>

Dr. Calof Answers Questions About Diabetes

Dr. Calof Answers Questions About Diabetes

After speaking at a series of patient meetings on the subject of Diabetes, Dr. Olga Calof, M.D. has compiled a list of the top questions and answers that are important to those dealing with this condition. My non fasting glucose is 95 mg/dL. My feet burn at times. Should I see a doctor? My dad died from diabetes complications. My brother developed diabetes last year. Am I at risk for this disease? Please explain the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Are “sugar spots” a true sign of diabetes? The light skin spots known as sugar spots showed up approximately one year before I was diagnosed with a HgA1C of 12.9% and a blood sugar of 12,650mg/dL. My doctor has me taking 3 metformin/day. Can I take those all at once or should I be splitting them throughout the day? Why do diabetic people “need” a quick sugar fix when they’re feeling weak or run down? If my doctor gave me medicine for diabetes, but my sugar after meals is usually below 116 mg/dL, do I need to take my medicine? What is the reality of how artificial sugar is processed in our body? I am exercising in a gym doing treadmill, elliptical and sit-ups (150x) for 1-1.5 hours. I am not losing weight. Is there anything more I can do? My non fasting glucose is 95 mg/dL. My feet burn at times. Should I see a doctor? The short answer is YES, schedule an appointment to see your doctor. A random blood sugar of 95 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) at home leads to more questions. Is this a random blood sugar (taken anytime during the day), or a fasting blood sugar (done after an eight hour fast). This is an important piece of information, but not enough to allow any conclusions to be made. To be diagnosed with diabetes, you must meet one of the following criteria: Have symptoms of increased thirst, increa Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

Three Blood Tests To Help You Better Manage The Risks Of High Blood Sugar

Three Blood Tests To Help You Better Manage The Risks Of High Blood Sugar

Q: I noticed that on a recent blood test my fasting blood sugar is 105 mg/dL. Last checkup it was 100 mg/dL. My doctor says it’s fine and not to worry but everything I’ve read tells me that I might be on the road to diabetes or have something called impaired insulin sensitivity (or insulin resistance). Can you suggest some blood tests that would give me a better picture of my risk factors, especially since both diabetes and high cholesterol issues run in my family? A: That is a great question, and you are wise to raise it. You may have the condition referred to as “impaired glucose tolerance,” also known as “insulin resistance” or “prediabetes.” In other words, your glucose level is indeed too high if your goal is optimal health. Here’s why… Though mainstream medicine once tolerated blood sugars as high as 140 mg/dL as “normal,” we now recognize the substantial cardiovascular, stroke, and cancer risks posed by sugar levels anywhere above 85 mg/dL.1-4 Above that level, your tissues are exposed to glucose at concentrations that cause chemical reactions with your body’s proteins and fats called glycation. Glycated proteins and fats trigger inflammation and oxidative stress, major enemies of longevity. Virtually all chronic diseases of aging (and aging itself) are accelerated by high glucose levels. As blood sugar rises, your risk of dying also goes up by approximately 40% when fasting glucose consistently falls in the range of 110-124 mg/dL. Risk of dying doubles when fasting glucose reaches the range of 126-138 mg/dL.5 But glucose is only part of the story. In order to keep your sugar under control, your body puts out increasingly large amounts of insulin, the hormone we need to take sugar out of the bloodstream and drive it into cells. And insul Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Answers To Your Diabetes Questions Cont'd

Answers To Your Diabetes Questions Cont'd

Why did my blood sugar increase after exercising and why is my urine and water from my eyes feel sticky? I never noticed it before being diagnosed with diabetes. Exercise usually makes your blood glucose levels go down, however if your blood glucose level is high before you start, exercise can make it go even higher. Your blood sugars should be between 120 and 250 before you exercise. Glucose is not usually found in urine. When the level of glucose in the blood is high, the kidneys will move excess glucose into the urine because it cannot properly absorb it all. This urine is characteristically sticky. It is important to inform your physician of this symptom as soon as possible. Diabetes can cause changes in your eyes. Keeping your blood glucose levels in control lowers your risk of developing any eye diseases. You should see an eye specialist (ophthalmologist or optometrist) once a year for a complete exam. Joan Perlmutter, RD, LDN, CDOE, CVDOE My husband is "pre-diabetic" but is there really such a thing? He was just given a referral slip for diabetes teaching, can he participate in the classes even though he is not on insulin? Pre-diabetes is a condition that comes before diabetes. It means that blood sugar levels are higher than normal but aren't high enough to be called diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with pre-diabetes, you are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and should do something about it at this time. Studies show that you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your lifestyle. Begin by making an appointment with a registered dietitian. What and how you eat is a key part of your care, the dietitian can help you figure out your food needs. The classes are for individuals who have already been diagnosed with diabetes whether or not Continue reading >>

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Testing

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Testing

There are many different times you can test your blood sugar. While a fasting blood sugar test, one taken when you have not had anything to eat or drink for the previous eight hours, is typically used to diagnose diabetes, testing at other times throughout the day can help you keep your blood sugar under control. Depending on your needs, you may test your blood sugar as little as twice daily or as frequently as seven or more times daily. Your doctor will recommend when and how frequently you should test your blood sugar. At-home blood sugar testing is usually performed with a hand-held monitor. Video of the Day Before and After Meal Testing A blood glucose level measured before a meal other than breakfast is typically a non-fasting blood sugar. Checking your blood sugar before a meal can help you choose which foods you can eat, which foods you should avoid, and how much insulin you should take if you are on a sliding scale. Testing your blood sugar about two hours after your meal lets you know how your body is processing your meal and whether you have enough insulin in your system to handle the food you ate. Fasting and before meal blood sugars should be in the 80 to 120 mg/dL range and after meal blood sugars should be less than 180 mg/dL, or as directed by your doctor. Many people with diabetes need to test their blood sugar before bed, and some even need to test during the night. Low blood sugar levels before bed can lead to hypoglycemia, a condition that can go unrecognized in the night and become dangerous. Some people, on the other hand, experience a phenomenon known as dawn syndrome, when their blood sugar rises near dawn even though they have not recently eaten. Testing your blood sugar at bedtime and during the night can help you and your doctor know more about Continue reading >>

Am I Pre-diabetic ?

Am I Pre-diabetic ?

After many months of feeling unwell eg dizzy spells, low energy, going to sleep whereever after eating junkfood or a big meal I had blood fasting test in Nov 2008 This month saw other Doctor at the Health Centre I go to, and got sent for a OGTT results were - fasting - 5.1 mmol/l ( 92 mg.dl ) - 2 hours after glucose - 8.7 mmol/l ( 156 mg.dl ) rang up couple days after test and Nurse said I had diabetes and need to go on oral meds straight away - come and see Doctor first thing in the morning Was quite freaked out to say the least. Saw Doctor in the morning, she said I wasnt diabetic and didnt need meds. But I was pre-diabetic and this was a serious warning. She went on to say I need to eat healthy and exercise to prevent getting diabetes I changed my eating straight away, and started two daily walks for exercise. I began to wonder if test results were one off, and my healthy eating would fix the problem straight away. So I got a blood glucose meter to check for myself. The definition of pre-diabetic has been changing and the standards are getting more stringent. I think you are pre-diabetic by the below definition of pre-diabetic. There are even lower standards elsewhere. Morning fasting BG = 100-125 = Pre-diabetic BG two hours after eating = 140-180 = Pre-diabetic The recommendations for a pre-diabetic are good for everybody. Avoid simple carbs and junk food, exercise regularly, and maintain a healthy body weight. Every time your BG spikes over 140 (7.8) you are damaging your body. Some pre-diabetics take metformin. This is something you should discuss with your doctor. If what you say is true ---I am pre diabetic . .....even normal ! Although my doctor said I am T2 ----I am on metformin . guess my numbers are not true numbers because of the assistance from the meds ? Continue reading >>

Bloodwork-what Does Glucose Of 111 Mean?

Bloodwork-what Does Glucose Of 111 Mean?

HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Diabetes > bloodwork-what does glucose of 111 mean? i just had bloodwork done and my fasting glucose came back at 111. what does this really mean? A doctor would probably tell you it's elevated and that he would want to see it under 100. If your doctor follows the ADA guidelines, he would diagnose diabetes if the fasting was over 125 on a few occasions and might run different blood tests, too. diabetes type 2 controlled so far by diet and exercise thank you for the quick response lanie. i was starting to freak out. Don't freak out! Stress can drive your blood sugar up! Are there other members of your family who have diabetes? Is this the first time you've had an elevated fasting blood sugar? diabetes type 2 controlled so far by diet and exercise mine has always been on the higher side, but never this high. i also had a 20 on protein in the urine. i have aunties that are diabetic. i am overweight. i have high blood pressure. i had labs done because i have been having vertigo and/or migraine for the last week. doc was checking everything out. I'm glad you're getting some lab work done. Protein in the urine can be a few things, not only diabetes. It could also bethe kidneys. I take meds for high blood pressure, too. I'm on an "ACE inhibitor" which also protects the kidneys, according to my doctor. Being overweight andwith some family members with diabetes raises chances ofbeing diabetic or insulin resistant. Sometimes, just losing weight, changing your diet and getting some regular, sustained exercise can control the diabetes and keep you off diabetes meds. But your fasting is just elevated. I think you could get it down with some of those changes. Have they figured out what's causing the vertigo? diabetes type 2 controlled Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

Glucose 111 - Say What!??? : General Health Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

Glucose 111 - Say What!??? : General Health Forum : Active Low-carber Forums

I had a fasting blood glucose test done. I was required to not eat for 8 hours. I actually slept an entire night, so I went about four hours above that w/o food. The brochure says that anyone between 100 and 125 mg/dl is pre-diabetic. The results on my test were 111. The last sugar I had eaten was probably 36 hours before the test. Every other day (about) I will drink a cup and a half of whole milk and eat 4 table spoons full of peanut butter. I pour a bit of heavy cream into the milk to make it extra satisfying. Anyone have any ideas? I'm 6"1' and 190 lbs. Never had any diagnosis of diabetes before. I never have excessive thirst or weakness. I've been eating low sugar for two years now. I hunted through some old records and found that in August of 2004 a blood test had me at 96 for glucose. In June of 2001 glucose was 89. There is so much advertising on the internet regarding testing for glucose - I could not find a good link. Does anyone know how accurate this test is? Oh, and 1/2 hour before the blood stick I got stung by a yellow jack (the little cabron!). Any chance that the adrenaline from that incident effected the test? Oh, and 1/2 hour before the blood stick I got stung by a yellow jack (the little cabron!). Any chance that the adrenaline from that incident effected the test? Yes, that could have an effect on the test. I'm sure you were excited from that incident and that would work like exercise in a diabetic. From the University of Michigan Health Service ...Sometimes blood sugars go up with exercise. This may happen because you are excited and are releasing a hormone called adrenaline. This is a normal response in people with or without diabetes. The adrenaline causes sugar to be released from stores in the muscle and liver and raises the blood sugar for aw Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

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