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My Blood Sugar Level Is 17

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level

Blood Sugar Level

The fluctuation of blood sugar (red) and the sugar-lowering hormone insulin (blue) in humans during the course of a day with three meals. One of the effects of a sugar-rich vs a starch-rich meal is highlighted.[1] The blood sugar level, blood sugar concentration, or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose present in the blood of humans and other animals. Glucose is a simple sugar and approximately 4 grams of glucose are present in the blood of humans at all times.[2] The body tightly regulates blood glucose levels as a part of metabolic homeostasis.[2] Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle and liver cells in the form of glycogen;[2] in fasted individuals, blood glucose is maintained at a constant level at the expense of glycogen stores in the liver and skeletal muscle.[2] In humans, glucose is the primary source of energy, and is critical for normal function, in a number of tissues,[2] particularly the human brain which consumes approximately 60% of blood glucose in fasted, sedentary individuals.[2] Glucose can be transported from the intestines or liver to other tissues in the body via the bloodstream.[2] Cellular glucose uptake is primarily regulated by insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas.[2] Glucose levels are usually lowest in the morning, before the first meal of the day, and rise after meals for an hour or two by a few millimoles. Blood sugar levels outside the normal range may be an indicator of a medical condition. A persistently high level is referred to as hyperglycemia; low levels are referred to as hypoglycemia. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by persistent hyperglycemia from any of several causes, and is the most prominent disease related to failure of blood sugar regulation. There are different methods of testing and measuring blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Kids And Teens With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Kids And Teens With Diabetes

Well-controlled blood sugars help children with diabetes grow and develop normally. Your doctor will help you figure out what levels are right for your child, since targets change as kids get older. Test your child's blood sugar several times a day so you'll know what you need to do to adjust it. Your goal is simple: Get it into the target range when it isn't. What causes ups and downs? Food Growth and hormones Illness Stress and other emotions No one expects a growing child's blood sugar levels to be normal all the time. And when your child enters puberty, his hormones could cause problems with blood sugars changing wildly. Remember, the numbers on the meter aren't "good" or "bad" -- they're just numbers. They give you information about how to keep your child healthy. Since you or your child might not notice symptoms, testing is the best way to avoid dangerously high and low levels. Help kids learn to manage their diabetes on their own. Encourage good habits. Praise your child when he tests, regardless of the result. Don't let him feel bad or blame him when his levels are out of range. Offer support to get him back on track. Continue reading >>

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

17 Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar Without Medications

Type 2 diabetes has become a global epidemic. But did you know that it’s not just preventable but also reversible? If you have Diabetes Type 2, we have for you a bunch of helpful tips on how to bring down blood sugar. While some of us are genetically at a risk of diabetes Type 2, it is largely a lifestyle disorder today. By changing your lifestyle, you can learn how to lower blood sugar levels naturally — without the need for medication. Most diabetes medications are nothing more than a temporary-fix. They don’t address the underlying reason behind high blood sugar, which is driven by the environment. Diet and lifestyle changes can reverse diabetes, unlike medications which only treat the symptoms. The key: Make a positive change to the way you eat, sleep, stay active, and manage stress. So, let’s learn how to bring down blood sugar through 15 easy, natural ways. How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally: 17 Actionable Tips 1. Cut Back On Carbohydrates A diet high in processed carbs adds to the sugar load in your diet. This is because all carbs get broken down into sugars upon digestion. This leads to increased blood sugar and weight gain. Avoid all carbs with a high glycemic index. We recommend a Low Carb-High Fat or LCHF diet to reverse diabetes. Ideally, only 10% of your daily caloric intake should come from carbs. The right carbs for any diabetic are fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat, amaranth and millets are some whole grains that work. 2. You Need More Of The Good Fats Afraid how will you survive when cutting back on the belly-filling carbs? This is where the good fats step in. Healthy fats that provide Omega 3 fatty acids are your friends. Not only will they keep you full for longer, they will also improve your heart health Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Know Your Blood Sugar Numbers: Use Them To Manage Your Diabetes

Checking your blood sugar, also called blood glucose, is an important part of diabetes care. This tip sheet tells you: why it helps you to know your blood sugar numbers how to check your blood sugar levels what are target blood sugar levels what to do if your levels are too low or too high how to pay for these tests Why do I need to know my blood sugar numbers? Your blood sugar numbers show how well your diabetes is managed. And managing your diabetes means that you have less chance of having serious health problems, such as kidney disease and vision loss. As you check your blood sugar, you can see what makes your numbers go up and down. For example, you may see that when you are stressed or eat certain foods, your numbers go up. And, you may see that when you take your medicine and are active, your numbers go down. This information lets you know what is working for you and what needs to change. How is blood sugar measured? There are two ways to measure blood sugar. Blood sugar checks that you do yourself. These tell you what your blood sugar level is at the time you test. The A1C (A-one-C) is a test done in a lab or at your provider’s office. This test tells you your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. How do I check my blood sugar? You use a blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar. This device uses a small drop of blood from your finger to measure your blood sugar level. You can get the meter and supplies in a drug store or by mail. Read the directions that come with your meter to learn how to check your blood sugar. Your health care team also can show you how to use your meter. Write the date, time, and result of the test in your blood sugar record. Take your blood sugar record and meter to each visit and talk about your results with your h Continue reading >>

Crikey My Blood Sugars Is 17.1

Crikey My Blood Sugars Is 17.1

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Feeling nauseous all week, slept for most of the weekend. twice my blood sugars read 17.1. What the hell should I do beside seeing my GP tomorrow. This is the highest it has been. Mine often is lots higher infact its 22.2 just now n im in tablets n insulin. Highest ive bn is 32.7 im type 2. If u keep getting highs go to GP n ask to be referred to diabetic clinic team. Good luck x Go see your GP today? Nausea + very high BG should qualify for an emergency appointment. Nausea could either be the cause of high BG or a symptom. Definitely get that GP appointment and get checked out. I hope you feel better soon! Have you got a cold or virus? That can make control harder. What are your levels normally like? And what have you been eating and drinking? Good luck at the docs, let us know what happens Mine was 20 with my first blood test, 23 a week later and my gp sent me to a first appointment with the diabetic nurse which was 4 weeks wait and told to go home and start my diet, no mention of what i should be eating or not eating on this diet. Three weeks later after cutting out sugar and sweet things I popped to tescos and had a prick test to see if my levels had dropped. The shock on the chemists face was a picture. My reading was 31.9! I was told that i needed to see a doctor within an hour and not to wait. So cutting a very long story short I ended up on a drip in hospital and going from possible type 2 to a full blown insulin using type 1. Im almost three months in and my levels are only just getting close to normal and am having hypos now and again. I have the best dsn in the word, im getting there at last. So dont worry , yes 17 is quite high but not unm Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Partner Has Blood Sugar Level Of 19

Partner Has Blood Sugar Level Of 19

I know this question was raised some time ago but for those that are still looking for answers. My blood sugar which is diet controlled and usually low has been high for three days and yesterday was 19+ Symptoms : raging headache, thirst, shaking, trouble getting blood for test. Losing focus, losing sensation in the end of fingers, irritability. The diabetic nurse said come and pick up a blood form and then get an appointment. Meanwhile it is a weekend and I don't know at what level I would need to get help because I'm already struggling with thought processes. The chemist didn't know the figure. but said see the doctor today. No appointments. The doctor rang me and said there was no number that was relevant It was the patient that needed to dealt with individually but he wasn't going to see me. So it boils down to.... The people I spoke to either didn't know what level was dangerous or just wanted to go through the motions. Basically as my surgery is closed at the weekend, all I wanted to know is, is it safe to leave it that high until the blood glucose can be brought down after the weekend. My advise for anyone with a similar problem as previous writers have said, with little knowledge, based on my symptoms, is, don't drive if you keep losing the thread in conversations. It's not worth the risk. It's a no brainer really. Even looking on the net it's difficult to get a definitive answer on numbers and how long you can leave it before you are at risk of collapse as I live alone. Continue reading >>

 Blood Sugar 17 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 17 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

General information about Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar, clinical name hypoglycemia, is a condition in which blood sugar levels in the body fall too low. Generally, a blood sugar level between 80 and 110 milligrams per deciliter is considered to be in normal range. When this level falls below 80, individuals may develop symptoms of low blood sugar. This condition often occurs in people with diabetes, when they try to control high glucose levels and the level falls too low. However, low blood sugar can occur from other causes, such as going for long periods without eating, from certain medications and from specific medical conditions. The disturbance in normal blood sugar levels can cause a variety of symptoms, which may be different in each individual. Common symptoms include: Individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes learn to monitor their blood sugar levels closely. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, they learn to recognize the signs, such as dizziness or nausea. Diabetics often have a glucometer to determine if low blood sugar is the cause. Test strips can also determine if blood sugar levels have dropped too low. They can then take measures to raise their blood sugar to a normal range. To quickly raise low blood sugar to a normal level, medical professionals advise consuming one of the following: Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

The American Diabetes Association published revised Standards of Care for diabetes, emphasizing that high-quality diabetes care must be individualized to reflect the needs, interests, and abilities of each person. The primary goal of care is to reduce blood glucose levels to as close to normal as is reasonable. To monitor success toward that goal, the diabetic should self-manage in a responsible manner using diet revision and exercise as the primary strategy and should self-monitor blood glucose levels at home. The secondary goal is to monitor for and, if detected, treat developing complications. This requires annual eye exams to detect retinopathy, annual urinalysis to search for early signs of nephropathy, periodic foot examinations, regular blood pressure and cholesterol and triglyceride testing to warn of impending heart disease. The official view is that patient education and motivation must be a central component of quality diabetes care because each person must provide daily self-care: managing food selection, meal planning staying in control of the diet getting daily exercise self-monitoring blood glucose taking medication, if required quitting smoking Blood Sugar Monitoring Home testing of blood glucose levels is useful for the self-managing diabetic. You have to remember that the reason for doing a test is to provide you with information that influences the decisions you make. An insulin dependent diabetic will make decisions about the dose and timing of insulin injections based on blood glucose levels. Blood glucose measurements are required to make good decisions about adjusting the insulin dose. A person with early type 2 diabetes will need less frequent blood glucose measurements to guide food choices and adjust activity levels. Several testing units are a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar: How To Be Prepared

Low Blood Sugar: How To Be Prepared

For people with type 2 diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can come on suddenly and strong. Even if you’re well-versed in symptoms such as shaking, dizziness, and headache, you might not have time to get back home or to a store if you're without glucose tablets or food to treat low blood sugar. A study published in the June 2013 issue of Endocrinology Practice found that about 17 percent of those with type 2 diabetes and 28 percent of the people with type 1 diabetes reported hypoglycemia symptoms in the preceding six months. Those who had low blood sugar events also experienced a lower quality of life. Yet despite how common hypoglycemia is, many people with diabetes still don’t plan for this risk. Hypoglycemia Can Happen at Any Time “I always ask people with diabetes, ‘Do you have something with you in case your blood sugar gets low?’ Oftentimes, they say no,” says Karen A. Chalmers, MS, RD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and the diabetes services program manager in the section of endocrinology, diabetes, and nutrition at Boston Medical Center in Massachusetts. She's known people who’ve felt symptoms of low blood sugar coming on while running errands, thought they could get to a nearby store to buy juice or food quickly, and collapsed on the sidewalk before they made it there. She's also known people whose hypoglycemia symptoms include cognitive impairment, leaving them passed out in front of a refrigerator because they were too confused to reach for the juice inside. Hypoglycemia is not to be taken lightly. Most people with diabetes are so focused on controlling high blood sugar that the possibility of low blood sugar doesn’t cross their minds. Those most at risk for hypoglycemia are people who take insulin, but some other diabetes medications Continue reading >>

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