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My Blood Sugar Is 78 Is That Too Low

A False Sense Of Hypoglycemia

A False Sense Of Hypoglycemia

By Nora Saul, M.S., R.D., C.D.E., Manager of Nutritional Services at Joslin Hypoglycemia is defined as a blood glucose level below 70mg/dl. But many people find that they feel the symptoms of low blood glucose at levels much higher than expected. Some patients have come into my office reporting getting sweaty, hungry and tachycardic at levels in the mid 130s. Symptoms of hypoglycemia are individual, but may include extreme hunger, nervousness, excessive perspiration, rapid heartbeat (tachycardia), headache, fatigue, mood changes, blurred vision and difficulty concentration and completing mental tasks. Extremely low glucose levels can lead to disorientation and convulsions. People who take insulin or some oral medications that cause the pancreas to produce insulin are usually prone to episodes of hypoglycemia. This is especially true if they are attempting to keep their glucose level as close to normal as possible. But, people in poor control can also have hypoglycemic reactions as they swing from high to low glucose levels. False hypoglycemia is usually due to one of two causes. The first can be compared to an incorrectly programmed thermostat. If you usually keep your room at a steamy 85 degrees, 70 degrees might start to feel chilly. People whose blood glucose is often high trick their body into thinking this is normal. If they rapidly bring their blood glucose into the normal range their bodies’ trigger the same autonomic and neurological warnings as if their blood glucose had fallen into the danger zone. Gradually bringing yourself into better control will help accustom your body to lower blood glucose levels. The other cause of pseudo-hypoglycemia occurs when glucose levels drop rapidly in a short time period. This can happen when exercising vigorously and can oc Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar: How To Be Prepared

Low Blood Sugar: How To Be Prepared

For people with type 2 diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can come on suddenly and strong. Even if you’re well-versed in symptoms such as shaking, dizziness, and headache, you might not have time to get back home or to a store if you're without glucose tablets or food to treat low blood sugar. A study published in the June 2013 issue of Endocrinology Practice found that about 17 percent of those with type 2 diabetes and 28 percent of the people with type 1 diabetes reported hypoglycemia symptoms in the preceding six months. Those who had low blood sugar events also experienced a lower quality of life. Yet despite how common hypoglycemia is, many people with diabetes still don’t plan for this risk. Hypoglycemia Can Happen at Any Time “I always ask people with diabetes, ‘Do you have something with you in case your blood sugar gets low?’ Oftentimes, they say no,” says Karen A. Chalmers, MS, RD, CDE, a certified diabetes educator and the diabetes services program manager in the section of endocrinology, diabetes, and nutrition at Boston Medical Center in Massachusetts. She's known people who’ve felt symptoms of low blood sugar coming on while running errands, thought they could get to a nearby store to buy juice or food quickly, and collapsed on the sidewalk before they made it there. She's also known people whose hypoglycemia symptoms include cognitive impairment, leaving them passed out in front of a refrigerator because they were too confused to reach for the juice inside. Hypoglycemia is not to be taken lightly. Most people with diabetes are so focused on controlling high blood sugar that the possibility of low blood sugar doesn’t cross their minds. Those most at risk for hypoglycemia are people who take insulin, but some other diabetes medications Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 78 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 78 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

General information about Normal blood sugar (slightly too low) Low blood sugar, clinical name hypoglycemia, is a condition in which blood sugar levels in the body fall too low. Generally, a blood sugar level between 80 and 100 milligrams per deciliter is considered to be in normal range. When this level falls below 80, individuals may develop symptoms of low blood sugar. This condition often occurs in people with diabetes, when they try to control high glucose levels and the level falls too low. However, low blood sugar can occur from other causes, such as going for long periods without eating, from certain medications and from specific medical conditions. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin. In type-1 diabetes, the body cannot produce any insulin. In type-2 diabetes, insulin is produced, but the body cannot utilize it properly. In both cases, insulin builds up in the bloodstream and causes damage to blood vessels and internal organs. Diabetics use diet, exercise and medications to control high blood sugar levels. As a result, blood sugar levels may fall too low, causing hypoglycemia. The disturbance in normal blood sugar levels can cause a variety of symptoms, which may be different in each individual. Common symptoms include: Individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes learn to monitor their blood sugar levels closely. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, they learn to recognize the signs, such as dizziness or nausea. Diabetics often have a glucometer to determine if low blood sugar is the cause. Test strips can also determine if blood sugar levels have dropped too low. They can then take measures to raise their blood sugar to a normal range. To quickly raise low blood sugar to a normal level, medical p Continue reading >>

Low Levels With Gestational Diabetes - How Low Is Too Low?

Low Levels With Gestational Diabetes - How Low Is Too Low?

Many women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are not given much information or advice around low levels. A question that we get asked frequently in our Facebook support group, is "how low is too low?" Levels below 2.0mmol/L should be reported to a health care professional, but if they are just lower than normal then please continue reading... The answer to this question differs depending on how your gestational diabetes is controlled: If you take Insulin or Glibenclamide:- If you are taking Glibenclamide or Insulin to help control your blood sugar levels (at any point in the day) then levels below 4.0mmol/L are classed as 'too low', a good phrase to remember is "four is the floor" As Glibenclamide is a sulfonylureas medicine it can cause hypoglycaemia (or hypos), the same as insulin. Please note: some medical teams may advise that a hypo is a blood sugar level below 3.5mmol/L rather than 4.0mmol/L. To learn more about hypos and how to treat them, please read more here. If you do not take any medication OR if you use Metformin:- If you are controlling your blood sugar levels with dietary changes alone OR with Metformin then you cannot have a true 'life threatening' hypo and lower levels should not be a cause of concern. You may experience low levels (e.g. levels below 4.0mmol/L) and have 'hypo type symptoms', which can be unpleasant, but there is no need to treat the hypo symptoms with glucose to raise levels, in fact this can worsen the problem. Eating a normal, gestational diabetes suitable snack will raise levels enough and should make you feel better. This is known as a 'false hypo'. More information on false hypos can be found on our false hypo page. Low levels below my lower test target Ladies often get concerned when their levels are below or towards the lower e Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 911

Blood Sugar 911

CBN.com - After experiencing periods of increased jittery nerves, violent trembling, and fainting – all signs of severely low blood sugar – author Dennis Pollock was on a mission to change his diet. Christmas Scare It should have been a pleasant night. It was the Christmas season, and we had just returned from our annual Christmas trip to Grandma’s house. We were sitting in our living room, watching a videotape that was one of my sons’ Christmas presents. I wasn’t having fun. It was happening again. Less than three hours after we had eaten supper I could feel that cold chill on my arms and those jittery telltale indicators that my blood-sugar levels were falling way too low. I quietly slipped out of the room and went into the bathroom to check my blood sugar with my glucometer—a device I had been totally ignorant of a year earlier but was now all too familiar with. As I suspected, my blood-sugar level was dangerously low, so low I knew I needed to take action fast. Grabbing a can of Coke, I drank the entire contents in under a minute. Now my blood sugar went the other way. Another test revealed the level had gone from 40 mg/dl to about 170 in a very short time. 1 (The normal range is 80 to 120.) My body began to tremble violently. I tried to go back into the living room and watch the movie, hoping no one would notice the trembling, but I realized the shaking wasn’t going to go away very soon. I slipped into the bedroom, put on a music CD, and got under the covers. As I trembled and shook, I could only think, What in the world is wrong with me? Looking Back The Christmas scare was not my first encounter with blood-sugar problems. As I look back over my life now, I realize I have had blood-sugar issues going back to the mid-1980s. In the early days I could n Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Children

Hypoglycemia In Children

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia occurs when the blood sugar is too low to fuel the brain and the body. Glucose is the main source of fuel for the body. The normal range of blood sugar, depending on the timing and nutritional content of the last meal consumed, is approximately 70 to 140 mg/dl (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood). If you have type 1 diabetes, your goal blood sugar range may be slightly different. Infants and small children with type 1 diabetes will have different goal ranges than adolescents or adults. However, consult your child's doctor for more specific information. Hypoglycemia may be a condition by itself, or may be a complication of diabetes or another disorder. Hypoglycemia is most often seen as a complication of overdoing insulin in a person with diabetes, which is sometimes referred to as an insulin reaction. What causes hypoglycemia? Causes of hypoglycemia in children with diabetes may include the following: Too much medication; for instance, too much insulin or oral diabetes medication Medication mistakes. All families will, at some point, give the wrong kind of insulin for a meal or at bedtime. Inaccurate blood-glucose readings A missed meal A delayed meal Too little food eaten, as compared to the amount of insulin taken More exercise than usual Diarrhea or vomiting Injury, illness, infection, or emotional stress Other medical problems sometimes seen in people with type 1 diabetes, such as celiac disease or an adrenal problem. An additional cause of hypoglycemia in neonates and toddlers includes a group of conditions called hyperinsulinism. This may occur as a result of abnormal cell development of the special "beta" cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin or from a mass in the pancreas. Hypoglycemia due to endogenous insulin i Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Blood sugar levels that drop too low can be just as dangerous as high blood sugar levels. This is especially a concern for diabetics, but nondiabetics can develop symptoms and health problems as well. To avoid complications it is important to be familiar with the warning signs of low blood sugar and what the common triggers are. If caught early, raising blood sugar levels with food can help avoid a life-threatening situation. Video of the Day Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is diagnosed when blood sugar or blood glucose levels drop below normal. Glucose is the primary source of fuel for the body and without enough of it, symptoms and health problems can occur. After a meal the food is broken down into glucose and either used immediately for energy or it is stored for use later on. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, when blood glucose levels drop too low, the pancreas signals the liver to release the stored glucose into the bloodstream, until levels return to normal. If not enough glucose is available, symptoms can occur. For those without diabetes, normal fasting blood glucose levels should be between 70 to 99 mg/dL and between 70 to 140 mg/dL after eating a meal. Without enough glucose the body will not be able to function normally. Early warning signs of low blood sugar include hunger, fatigue, sweating, headaches, shakiness, dizziness, weakness, confusion, difficulty coordinating movement, anxiety, problems with vision, upset stomach and trouble speaking, Medline Plus states. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can cause fainting, a loss of consciousness, irregular heartbeats, tremors, seizures and coma. In severe cases it can be fatal. In those without diabetes, low blood sugar levels are usually caused by skipping meals or heavy alcohol con Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Home / Health Topics /Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of sugar in the blood is too low. It can also be called insulin shock or insulin reaction. Hypoglycemia is when the level of sugar in the blood is below 60 mg/dl. Check with your doctor or nurse to find out what blood sugar level is too low for you. Taking too much insulin or oral medication Not eating all of your meals and snacks or delaying meals and snacks Hypoglycemia can occur at any time. It is more likely to occur at peak times of insulin actions. It may occur during or after increased activity. It is more likely if you are late eating your food or reduce the amount that you eat. Immediately eat or drink something containing "quick acting" sugar. Some possibilities are: If your symptoms do not disappear in 15 minutes and/or your blood sugar remains less than 80, repeat the treatment. Repeat every 15 minutes until the blood sugar is greater than 80. If a reaction occurs at a time when you do not plan to eat your next meal or snack for more than 30 minutes, eat food containing starch and protein after you have taken a "quick acting" sugar source and begin to feel better. Foods containing starch and protein are necessary to help prevent another reaction. The food eaten for a reaction need not be subtracted from a meal plan. Obtain a blood sugar when symptoms occur if you are able. If symptoms are severe, treat the reaction first and then obtain a blood sugar. Do not drive nor operate equipment if you feel your blood sugar is low. If your blood sugar drops low enough for you to become unconscious, you must be taken to the hospital and/or treated with glucagon. Glucagon is a hormone that causes the blood sugar to rise. It can only be given by injection. It is used to treat a low b Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic Fasting Blood Sugar 78 Is It Low,and How Fast Can Your Sugar Drop? | Yahoo Answers

Pre-diabetic Fasting Blood Sugar 78 Is It Low,and How Fast Can Your Sugar Drop? | Yahoo Answers

Pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar 78 is it low,and how fast can your sugar drop? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Although you have a perfect fasting number, you still probably have problems after you eat.You can have normal fasting numbers and still be Prediabetic. Take some Post Prandial tests 2 hours after you eat.. A truly normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a normal person will see right before a meal) is Between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) and 92 mg/dl (5.0 mmol/L) . Doctors consider any fasting blood sugar between 70 mg/dl (3.9 mg/dl) and 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) to be normal. But several studies suggest that people whose fasting blood sugar is over 92 mg/dl (5.1 mmol/L) are more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes over the next decade. Blood sugars under 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L) are considered to be hypoglycemic. However, if you are not on insulin or a drug that causes your pancreas to secrete insulin, a blood sugar slightly below this range, while it might be uncomfortable, is not dangerous unless there is evidence that it is continuing to drop. The dangerous levels of low blood sugar--the hypos that require a visit to the ER--are those in the 40 mg/dl (2.2 mmol/L) range and lower. At those levels unconsciousness and brain damage can occur. Independent of what they eat, the blood sugar of a truly normal person is: Under 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L) one or two hours after a meal. Most normal people are under 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating. No 101 is not pre-diabetes. Also if you are using a home meter kit, your results are not 100% accurate and can be slightly off by a few to several points. So in other words if you get a reading of 101 on your meter, in actuality you could be 90 or 110. Thats just the truth. The mos Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetic? Or Diabetic? Help Me Understand These Numbers, Please...

Pre-diabetic? Or Diabetic? Help Me Understand These Numbers, Please...

Pre-Diabetic? Or Diabetic? Help me understand these numbers, please... Pre-Diabetic? Or Diabetic? Help me understand these numbers, please... Never been diagnosed. Here's the story... My wife, out of the blue, wanted to test her blood sugar. So I tested her and then tested myself as a control. She was fine...but.. It turns out my blood sugar was 258, then 270 on the 2nd test. This was last Friday, October 19th but the strips were 2 years old and expired (and recalled too). I bought new strips, but they gave an E-6 error. I called Relion and they shipped out a new meter that works with the new, blue strips. My brother had Type 1 diabetes since he was 9. He advised me to try improving blood sugar with diet and exercise before I go to the doctor. He said once I'm on any form of insulin, I'll be on it permanently. I immediately started walking 1 hour and eating low/no carb. I had done Atkins 6 years ago and lost around 40 lbs. Between work, marriage and kids, it crept back. I'm currently 246 and 6'1". The replacement meter arrived this past Tuesday, 10/23. I immediately tested. I've been walking 1 hour at night at a very brisk pace (3.25 miles) since Oct 20th. After walking, ate 2 hard boiled eggs and 1 slice of 40 calorie wheat toast (my bad). Went to sleep 2 hours later. 150 - Right out of bed...no food. Freaked out so I started reading and found this site. Learned from you guys that I should be testing more often so.... 125 - Before no carb breakfast - 2 eggs, 3 bacon, cheese. Went for 44 min walk + basic chest presses at 9pm. 130 - After walk/weight lifting. Proceeded to eat a medium ceasar salad with parmesan cheese and real bacon bits. 133 - 2 hours after caesar salad. Went to sleep 2 hours later. Breakfast - Ate 5 Net Carb Flour Tortilla, 2 eggs, 3 bacon, cheese. Ca Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

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