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Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-term Diabetes Control

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-term Diabetes Control

A Craftsman Blames His Tools: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy & Long-Term Diabetes Control Summary After consistently receiving higher-than-expected A1c results, I tested my meter against four of the most popular meters available to see if systematic bias was at the heart of my frustration. The results were particularly damning to not only my meter, but to the landscape as a whole. I found that meter accuracy alone could be responsible for a full 1.5% difference in A1c without any change to perceived glucose control, resulting in significantly different treatment plans and emotional outcomes. This contrasts the rhetoric presented by device manufacturers, medical providers, and leading diabetes organizations, all of whom take a particularly casual approach to the question of accuracy. Introduction When I started using Dexcom’s G4 Platinum w/ Share continuous glucose monitor (CGM) about a year ago, I found that my average glucose was not correlating well with my periodic A1c results. Specifically, for three separate three-month periods, my A1c came in a full percentage point higher than my average glucose (as calculated from my CGM data) would predict. This was especially frustrating given how much effort I was spending tuning my homemade artificial pancreas. While there are numerous potential sources for this discrepancy, the fact that it was occurring consistently pointed me in the direction of something that could cause systematic bias: the twice-daily blood glucose meter readings used to calibrate my CGM. For the past seven years or so, I have been using the Johnson & Johnson LifeScan OneTouch UltraLink blood glucose meter. This is the meter that was provided with my Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm 722 insulin pump and carries Medtronic branding. It is not a “current” m Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

Glucose Meter Shopping Guide

By the dLife Editors Looking for a blood glucose monitor? Here’s our extensive guide to the products on the market today. dLife does not endorse any product mentioned here. Links to manufacturers’ websites are offered for information purposes only. Abbot The FreeStyle Freedom Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System has a new ergonomic shape and large numeral display. There is no coding and allows for easy testing with the world’s smallest sample size. This meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Four reminder alarms; ability to add more blood for up to one minute; provides results in 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522-5226 www.abbottdiabetescare.com The FreeStyle Lite Blood Glucose Monitoring System is a small and discreet system that offers key features such as no coding, the world’s smallest blood sample size, and a test strip port light. The FreeStyle Lite meter uses only FreeStyle Lite test strips. Blood Sample Size Required: 0.3 uL Time to Results: 5-seconds Battery Requirements: (1) CR2032 lithium coin cell Alternative Site Testing: Yes Data Capabilities: Computer download capabilities; stores up to 400 results with date and time User Coding Required: No Other Special Features: Port light and backlight on display; four reminder alarms; provides 7-, 14-, and 30-day averages Company Contact Information: Abbott Diabetes Care, Inc. 1360 South Loop Road Alameda, CA 94502 1-800-522- Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Meters: Most Accurate

Blood Sugar Meters: Most Accurate

A laboratory tested 18 of the most commercially available blood sugar meters available in the US. My personal testing of some of the included meters matches the study’s… that’s a good sign. top meters tested worst meters tested The top-rated blood sugar meter is Contour Next. The only meter to have 100% accuracy, according to this study. Impressive. I have not used this particular meter, but I have used and love Contour Next EZ (it wasn’t tested). Meter accuracy can (and will) vary even among identical models. Additionally, the second component of every blood sugar test, the strips — can vary in accuracy as well. If you ever receive an unexpected blood sugar test, it’s always wise to re-test, especially if the result requires you to adjust insulin or diabetes drugs. Blood Sugar Meter Test You can read the full study “here‘. The group doing the testing, “Diabetes Technology Society”, has Big Pharma companies as sponsors… so be aware of that. However at least in ‘design’, it appears to be a well-controlled study. “This study was triple blinded. None of the people involved in conducting this study (i.e. neither investigators, laboratory staff, statistician, nor sponsor) had all the information to break the BGMS code until all results were calculated and posted. “ Over 1,000 subjects provided blood samples, and each of the 18 meters were put through three separate tests. Sadly, only 6 of the 18 passed each of the three tests, and are recommended. Links below are Amazon Affiliate links. Passed the Test: Recommended Accu-Check Aviva Plus 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) 97% CVS Advanced 97% FreeStyle Lite 96% Failed the Test: Not Recommended Listed in order of accuracy, from highest to lowest. Walmart ReliOn Prime 92% One Touch Verio 92% Prodig Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Buying Guide

Controlling your blood sugar, or blood glucose, level is key to managing diabetes. Accurate test results help people with diabetes adjust their diet, exercise routine, and treatment plan—which might help prevent complications and reduce the risk of seizures, kidney disease, nerve damage, and blindness. Anyone with diabetes can benefit from testing. Blood glucose monitoring can be important for those taking insulin or other diabetes medications, women with gestational diabetes (diagnosed during pregnancy), and those having difficulty controlling their diabetes. Today's blood glucose meters are smaller, faster, more accurate than older models, and come with more features. We tested dozens of models priced between $10 and $75. Use our guide to help you find the best monitor for your needs. All glucose monitors work in a similar way, but some have features and options that might better suit your specific needs. Talk with your doctor or diabetes educator about which monitor matches monitoring requirements lifestyle, and budget. Cost Don't just look at the retail price of the meters alone. What makes blood glucose monitoring expensive is the test strips, which you might use many times a day. At $18 to $184 per 100 test strips, the cost can add up to about $265 to $2,685 a year for people who test four times a day. Replacement lancets are another expense to consider. Insurance Medicare covers some diabetes-related supplies, and private insurance might cover some of the cost. See if there are certain brands of meters and test strips that insurance covers. Find out how many test strips, if any, are covered per month. Your strip coverage may depend, for example, on whether you use insulin. Automatic Coding Blood glucose meters need to be calibrated to each batch of test strips. Continue reading >>

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Accuracy Evaluation Of Five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems Obtained From The Pharmacy: A European Multicenter Study With 453 Subjects

Go to: Abstract This multicenter study was conducted to evaluate the performance of five recently introduced blood glucose (BG) monitoring (BGM) devices under daily routine conditions in comparison with the YSI (Yellow Springs, OH) 2300 Stat Plus glucose analyzer. Five hundred one diabetes patients with experience in self-monitoring of BG were randomized to use three of five different BGM devices (FreeStyle Lite® [Abbott Diabetes Care Inc., Alameda, CA], FreeStyle Freedom Lite [Abbott Diabetes Care], OneTouch® UltraEasy® [LifeScan Inc., Milpitas, CA], Accu-Chek® Aviva [Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany], and Contour® [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen, Germany]) in a daily routine setting. All devices and strips were purchased from local regular distribution sources (pharmacies, four strip lots per device). The patients performed the finger prick and the glucose measurement on their own. In parallel, a healthcare professional performed the glucose assessment with the reference method (YSI 2300 Stat Plus). The primary objective was the comparison of the mean absolute relative differences (MARD). Secondary objectives were compliance with the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accuracy criteria under these routine conditions and Clarke and Parkes Error Grid analyses. MARD ranged from 4.9% (FreeStyle Lite) to 9.7% (OneTouch UltraEasy). The ISO 15197:2003 requirements were fulfilled by the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%), FreeStyle Freedom Lite (97.5%), and Accu-Chek Aviva (97.0%), but not by the Contour (92.4%) and OneTouch UltraEasy (91.1%). The number of values in Zone A of the Clarke Error Grid analysis was highest for the FreeStyle Lite (98.8%) and lowest for the OneTouch Ultra Easy (90.4%). FreeStyle Lite, FreeStyle Freedom Lite, and Accu-Chek Aviva perform Continue reading >>

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

Credit: Accu-chek.com The Accu-Chek Aviva was first in an evaluation of a dozen meters conducted by a team of testing experts at Germany’s University of Ulm led by Guido Freckmann, M.D. It led the field in accuracy and precision. Few studies of meter accuracy have appeared in the more than 20 years that I have been writing about diabetes. Dr. Freckmann and his team of researchers have been the most relevant, reliable, and prolific in testing our meters. But some of the meters that they evaluated aren’t available in the United States. The leading diabetes journal that evaluates our meters just released the full text of this meter accuracy study. The editors tell me that the study will be free online only until March 31. Most Relevant Info So don’t wait too long if you want to review the whole thing. Meanwhile, I summarize below what I think is the most relevant information. The journal is Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, and the study is “Evaluation of 12 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Testing: System Accuracy and Measurement Reproducibility.” The journal published it two years ago, but until now only the abstract has been freely available to us. Dr. Freckmann and his colleagues rated the meters against both the current and proposed standards. The current standard can be met more easily. It requires that at least 95 percent of the results fall within plus or minus 15 mg/dl at blood glucose levels below 75 mg/dl and within plus or minus 20 mg/dl at levels greater than or equal to 75 mg/dl. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set this level back in 2003, and it is the standard not only in Europe but also in the United States because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration uses it. The Tighter Standard ISO’s 2013 standard is tigh Continue reading >>

Glucose Meters - How Accurate Are They?

Glucose Meters - How Accurate Are They?

I test my blood a lot. If I had to put money on it, I believe I average 8-10 finger pricks a day. Even with a continuous glucose monitor (CGM), I double check my levels every time (okay most times) I eat, feel off and/or need to calibrate. However, I find it interesting when I test my glucose seconds apart, my meter doesn't always tell me the exact same readings. Admittingly, I do not wash and dry my hands everytime before testing (yes it matters), but even when I am well-groomed in the process, two readings can be 5-15 mg/dl different. Sometimes the difference is even more, and if that is the case, I will test a third time. But which glucose reading do I believe? Often I go with what the second reading is (if I am using the same poked finger) or I do a quick average of the two. Overall, if I test and get a number that doesn't relate to how I am feeling, I test again. Besides washing my hands, I try to ensure the test strips are stored in a cool dry place, the lancet is new (I struggle here) and I try to measure my meter's accuracy, comparing it to a lab at my endo appointment, once a year. Thankfully, the technology of blood sugar control is getting better and as of 2016 the standards for all new meters were heightened: 95% of all measured blood glucose meter values must be within 15% of the true value, 99% of meter values must be within 20% of the true value, research on new meters must include at least 350 people with diabetes, larger than previously required, and they require greater hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) accuracy than the 2013 ISO standard. Putting this into practical terms, if the true glucose value is 100 mg/dl, the over the counter meter has to be within 15 mg/dl (85-115 mg/dl) in 95% of cases, and within 20 mg/dl (80-120 mg/dl) in 99% of cases. For hea Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

If handheld blood glucose meters were always as accurate checking blood sugar levels as the much bigger (25 pounds), much more expensive ($10,000) analyzers that hospitals and labs use, then hospitals and labs would use the small, personal blood sugar meters. Find out more about how meters get to market, what to look for when choosing your next meter, and how to calculate the performance results of the meter you have now. How meters get to market To get clearance to market a new meter, a manufacturer needs to submit data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that shows the new blood glucose monitoring system (meter plus test strips) is as safe to use and effective as other devices on the market that have FDA clearance. Many meter companies cite criteria published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), a network of the national standards institutes of 162 countries, based in Switzerland. The standard for blood glucose meters is ISO 15197, published in 2003. It is an FDA-recognized standard. It includes instructions for manufacturers on how tests of accuracy are to be run and what counts as a passing grade. Companies don't have to go by the ISO standard. According to the FDA, "Conformance with recognized consensus standards is strictly voluntary for a medical device manufacturer. A manufacturer may choose to conform to applicable recognized standards or may choose to address relevant issues in another manner." So if a manufacturer isn't using the ISO standard, it still has to make a case to the FDA that the device and strips are as safe to use and effective as others on the market. How is accuracy tested? Accuracy means how close the meter's results are to the results from a big, expensive, carefully calibrated lab analyzer. ISO requires man Continue reading >>

What Is The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter That I Can Sync With Health App On Android?

What Is The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter That I Can Sync With Health App On Android?

Self-monitoring of blood glucose on a regular basis requires an easy to access device which can be easily plugged into your mobile phone and can be carried along even when you are on the go. More important, however, is the accuracy and reliability of the device. With BeatO’s CE certified smartphone based mobile glucometer, you will never have to worry about missing your blood glucose readings even when you are travelling. This works well to turn your smartphone into a handy diabetes management tool. It can be directly plugged into the audio jack of the smartphone and as soon as you take a reading, you are directly linked to a personalized diabetes educator who then periodically guide you to different aspects of lifestyle management to live healthy and happy with diabetes. BeatO Smartphone Glucometer lets you create a network through its easy share feature such that your family, Doctor and Personal Diabetes Expert gets an alert when your reading is not in the safe zone. Continue reading >>

Choosing A Glucose Meter

Choosing A Glucose Meter

I'm interested in purchasing a blood glucose monitor, and I'm having difficulty finding information regarding which glucose monitor is the most accurate. Is there an independent study that shows accuracy data of all the meters? The FDA reviews all glucose meters and test strips before they can be sold to the public. The manufacturers need to demonstrate to the FDA that their meters provide acceptable accuracy and consistency of readings. I would first check with your insurance provider to see what type of meter they cover. Insurance providers usually limit their coverage to specific models. You can certainly purchase the meter and its supplies yourself, but test strips are very costly. Most insurance providers cover some of the cost of your meter, test strips, and lancets. Consumer Reports, an independent consumer-testing organization, reviews products and may be a resource for you. Related Questions Metformin for Pre-Diabetes? Tomatoes in a Diabetic Diet?My husband has type 2 diabetes. He heard that tomatoes have too much sugar in them, however, most recipes for diabetics contain tomatoes or tomato products. How do tomatoes fit into a diabetic diet? Diabetes Risks and NationalityWhat exactly is meant by the statement that "you might have a higher risk of diabetes due to nationality"? What does nationality have to do with it? Does it have to do with the foods that a particular nationality eats? Is Type 2 Diabetes Hereditary?I'm a woman and diabetes runs in my family. So I've made an effort to watch what I eat, keep my weight down, and exercise. But now I've read that with a family history, my risk of pre-diabetes is increased - even if I'm slim. How can I prevent this? Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Tweet Blood glucose meters in the UK should meet the standards set by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). However, there are a number of factors which could affect the accuracy of a blood glucose result. ISO guidelines state that blood glucose meters should provide results which fall between the upper and lower error bounds, given in the table below, 95% of the time: Within ± 0.83 mmol/L of laboratory results at concentrations of under 4.2 mmol/L Within ± 20% of laboratory results at concentrations of 4.2 mmol/L or more ISO 2003 guidelines on blood glucose meter accuracy bounds Test result given Lower bound Upper bound 1.0 0.17 1.83 1.5 0.67 2.33 2.0 1.17 2.83 2.5 1.67 3.33 3.0 2.17 3.83 3.5 2.67 4.33 4.0 3.17 4.83 5.0 4.00 6.25 6.0 4.80 7.50 7.0 5.60 8.75 8.0 6.40 10.00 9.0 7.20 11.25 10.0 8.00 12.50 12.0 9.60 15.00 14.0 11.20 17.50 16.0 12.80 20.00 18.0 14.40 22.50 20.0 16.00 25.00 Accuracy standards set to improve By the end of May 2016, new standards are being implemented to ensure that blood glucose meters meet stricter accuracy standards. Under the new standard, meters will need to meet the accuracy guidelines 95% of the time: Within ± 0.83 mmol/L of laboratory results at concentrations of under 5.6 mmol/L Within ± 15% of laboratory results at concentrations of 5.6 mmol/L or more ISO 2013 guidelines on blood glucose meter accuracy bounds Test result given Lower bound Upper bound 1.0 0.17 1.83 1.5 0.67 2.33 2.0 1.17 2.83 2.5 1.67 3.33 3.0 2.17 3.83 3.5 2.67 4.33 4.0 3.17 4.83 5.0 4.17 5.83 6.0 5.10 7.06 7.0 5.95 8.24 8.0 6.80 9.41 9.0 7.65 10.59 10.0 8.50 11.76 12.0 10.20 14.12 14.0 11.90 16.47 16.0 13.60 18.82 18.0 15.30 21.18 20.0 17.00 23.53 Expired test strips Always check the expiry date of test strips before performing a test as expi Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Are blood glucose meters accurate? A few months ago, I read a post on blood glucose meter (in)accuracy that was quite alarming. Chris Hannemann, T1D and OpenAPS’er, tested five popular blood glucose meters for accuracy and found major discrepancies. The overall variability between the meters was roughly ±11 %, and two of the meters — both from the same manufacturer — showed major bias. Chris had been using one of those meters to calibrate his CGM and consistently found that his lab-measured A1C would come in a full percentage point higher than his CGM average would predict (e.g., the meter-calibrated CGM data would correspond to an A1C of 6%, but laboratory-measured A1C would actually be 7%). As someone who wears a CGM and always strives to achieve an A1C of ~6.0% or lower, this post freaked me out. If I’m calibrating my CGM with a meter whose results are always off by that much… how can I be sure about reaching my targets?!? But I was also skeptical when I saw Chris’ post, because my A1C has always matched my predictions (based on my CGM average). So, I decided to run my own test on 10 popular meters from various manufacturers. Much to my relief, all 10 meters produced very similar results for each blood sample, with an overall between-meter variability of just under 6%. Below I describe the test and discuss the results. And, in another post, I explain some reasons why your average BG on your meter might not always correspond with your A1C results. (Key point: It doesn’t necessarily mean your meter is bad!) The Test The Meters Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Contour Next EZ OmniPod PDM FreeStyle Meter FreeStyle Lite Livongo InTouch OneTouch Ultra Mini One Touch Ultra 2 Walgreens True Metrix Air Walgreens True 2 Go Wal-Mart ReliOn Confirm These 10 meters varied i Continue reading >>

Best Glucometers

Best Glucometers

Compact, easy-to-use glucometers are the norm When it comes to blood glucose meters, fewer steps mean fewer mistakes. So the best glucose meters are those that make the basic process of testing your blood sure as foolproof as possible: Insert test strip, prick finger, apply blood, read result. The tiny FreeStyle Lite (Est. $25) home glucose monitor -- itself no bigger than a pack of gum -- goes one step further by requiring only 0.3 microliters of blood for each sample. Users love the small sample size, which they say makes the testing process much less painful and intimidating. They also appreciate that the meter beeps once you've added enough blood and that if you don't get enough blood onto the test strip with your first try, you have up to 60 seconds to add more blood. There's also no need for manual coding when you open a new set of test strips, which helps cut down on possible errors. Even more important than its comfort and user-friendly features, the FreeStyle Lite receives some of the best scores for accuracy and repeatability in clinical trials and from a leading consumer research organization. And although this isn't the newest meter on the block, users still love it for its reliability. Other features that make the FreeStyle Lite so popular with users include its simple three-button operation, a backlit screen and illuminated test strip port for discreet testing in the dark, and the ability to store up to 400 readings and calculate averages that show blood glucose trends over time. The FreeStyle Lite also has a data port that lets you download your readings into a Windows or OS X computer using FreeStyle's Auto-Assist desktop program. The program compiles several types of reports including meter settings, meal event averages, daily statistics and a snapshot Continue reading >>

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