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Morning Blood Sugar 110

How To Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar ? What Is Fbs ?

How To Reduce Fasting Blood Sugar ? What Is Fbs ?

How to reduce Fasting blood sugar ? What is FBS ?             I love building muscles so I have to consume lots of milk, proteins and carbohydrates for energy......? Today I got my Sugar levels tested but Fasting blood sugar is showing 105 where the range is 60 minimum to 110 max. PPBS and Glucose blood sugar GH1BC all are normal.  Now i am worried as I am close to 110 in Fasting blood sugar ? how to reduce it further.......I do cardio for 30 minutes everyday with 10kms speed..5 kms per day...still fasting blood sugar is on the higher end but normal non- diabetic ! Please answer my question after reading the above details.   Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Pre-diabetes

Insulin Resistance And Pre-diabetes

Are you at risk? What is insulin resistance? What causes insulin resistance? Metabolic Syndrome What is pre-diabetes? What are the symptoms of insulin resistance and pre-diabetes? How are insulin resistance and pre-diabetes diagnosed? Risk Factors for Pre-diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Can insulin resistance and pre-diabetes be reversed? Can medicines help reverse insulin resistance or pre-diabetes? Points to Remember Hope through Research For More Information Are you at risk? What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body produces insulin but does not use it properly. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps the body use glucose for energy. Glucose is a form of sugar that is the body’s main source of energy. The body’s digestive system breaks food down into glucose, which then travels in the bloodstream to cells throughout the body. Glucose in the blood is called blood glucose, also known as blood sugar. As the blood glucose level rises after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help cells take in and use the glucose. When people are insulin resistant, their muscle, fat, and liver cells do not respond properly to insulin. As a result, their bodies need more insulin to help glucose enter cells. The pancreas tries to keep up with this increased demand for insulin by producing more. Eventually, the pancreas fails to keep up with the body’s need for insulin. Excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream, setting the stage for diabetes. Many people with insulin resistance have high levels of both glucose and insulin circulating in their blood at the same time. Insulin resistance increases the chance of developing type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Learning about insulin resistance is the first step toward making lifestyle changes Continue reading >>

Conversion Chart For Blood Sugar Levels: Mg/dl To Mmol/l

Conversion Chart For Blood Sugar Levels: Mg/dl To Mmol/l

Here is a simple conversion chart for blood sugar levels that you can use for reading your diabetes blood test results. This table is meant for fasting blood glucose, ie. readings taken after fasting for a minimum of 8 hours. *** 18 mg/dL of blood glucose = 1 mmol/L of blood glucose Note that in Canada, there's a higher allowable reading for a normal fasting blood sugar level. A fasting blood glucose reading of 6.1 mmol/L (110 mg/dl) or less is considered normal. The pre-diabetic range is more than 6.1 mmol/L to 6.9 mmol/L (> 110 mg/dl to 125 mg/dl). Fasting Blood Sugar Range mg/dL mmol/L Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) 30 40 50 60 70 1.7 2.2 2.8 3.3 3.9 Normal Blood Sugar 70 80 90 100 3.9 4.4 5.0 5.5 * Pre-Diabetic Range 101 110 120 125 5.6 6.1 6.7 6.9 * Diabetic Range 126 140 155 160 175 190 200 250 300 400 600 7.0 7.8 8.6 8.9 9.7 10.6 11.1 13.9 16.7 22.2 33.3 While this conversion chart for blood sugar levels is a good guideline, everyone's body responds differently. Work with your doctor to set realistic goals specifically for you. If you've only tried exercise and dietary changes to treat type 2 diabetes, but these changes aren't working to keep your blood glucose under control, then it's time to have a chat with your doctor about starting medication. Diabetes has serious long-term effects on health and keeping it well-managed is critical to feeling well. Make sure you have testing supplies on hand to monitor your blood sugar levels. Knowing your glucose levels is the first step in learning how to manage them. Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

On The Doorstep Of Diabetes

On The Doorstep Of Diabetes

One out of four Americans are well on their way toward joining the millions who already have diabetes. Here's what you can do to avoid being one of them. When she worked as a journalist in Palo Alto, Loren Stein, then 44, never gave much thought to diabetes. "My image of a diabetic was someone who ate a ton of sugar and was really overweight," she says. "I never put myself in that category." Stein got a wake-up call during a routine checkup. Her fasting blood sugar level was 119 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood, significantly higher than the normal range of 70 to 99. She didn't have diabetes, but she was headed in that direction. "I was shocked," she says. "I thought it must be a mistake." According to the American Diabetes Association, up to 79 million Americans have a little too much sugar in their blood, a condition that makes them prime targets for type 2 diabetes. In medical-speak, these people have "impaired glucose tolerance" or "impaired fasting glucose," now referred to as prediabetes. Impaired fasting glucose was first defined as a fasting glucose of 110 to 125 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood, but in 2003 the cutoff for prediabetes dropped to 100 milligrams of glucose per deciliter. Prediabetes can be defined as impaired fasting glucose (100 mg/dL to 125 mg/dL), impaired glucose tolerance, or both. Whatever term you use for prediabetes, the condition is a call for action. Several recent studies have shown that a healthy lifestyle can help keep prediabetes from turning into the real thing. If you've been diagnosed with this condition, the ball is in your court. The road to diabetes Aside from fats or protein, just about everything you eat is broken down into sugars (glucose is the simplest sugar). After a meal, the sugar is absorbed int Continue reading >>

Why All The Morning Highs?

Why All The Morning Highs?

Sometimes diabetes doesn’t make a lot of sense. Think of those mornings when you wake up to find your blood glucose looking as if you’ve been up all night eating cookies. What’s up with that? You’d think that not eating for those seven or eight hours would give you lower blood glucose, right? Such morning highs are common in people with diabetes, but one of the reasons has a particular name: the dawn phenomenon. The dawn phenomenon is a natural rise in blood glucose between 4 and 8 a.m., which happens because of hormonal changes in the body. All people have the “dawn phenomenon,” whether they have diabetes or not. People without diabetes would never notice it happening, as a normal body’s insulin response adjusts for this. However, because people with diabetes don’t have normal insulin responses, they may see an increase in their fasting blood glucose. This is primarily because people with diabetes produce less insulin and more glucagon than they need. The less insulin produced by the pancreas, the more glucagon the pancreas makes as a result. Glucagon, in turn, signals the liver to break down its storage supplies of glycogen into glucose. This is why high fasting blood glucose levels are commonly seen in patients with type 2 diabetes. The effects of dawn phenomenon vary in each person, and your blood glucose may be higher on some mornings than on others. But not to worry—there are steps you can take to get those numbers down and start your days more comfortably in your target blood glucose range. Treatment for dawn phenomenon depends on how you treat your diabetes. If you take insulin, you may be able to adjust your dosing so that peak action occurs closer to the morning rise in your blood glucose. If you have type 2, diabetes pills provide options as Continue reading >>

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why It’s A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why It’s A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

The patient I am going to describe is unique in her own issues, but her frustration with conventional medicine could be duplicated in my practice many times over. Louisa is a forty-five-year-old teacher and mother of two. After the birth of her children, she was unable to lose the twenty-five pounds she gained and she was experiencing profound fatigue. After watching one of my webinars on the epidemic of diabesity, which is broadly described as the continuum from mild insulin resistance (when your cells become numb to insulin) to full-blown diabetes and obesity, [1] Louisa asked her primary care physician to test her fasting blood sugar and check her thyroid. Her blood sugar came back at 98 mg/dl and her thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 2.7. Her doctor told her that both were in the normal range and that she was simply experiencing the effects of aging. Her doctor was correct that the American Diabetes Association has identified a fasting plasma glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL as being pre-diabetic and anything below 100 is “normal.”[2] But if you were to wait until your glucose level is in that range, you’ve got a serious problem. In fact, current guidelines have been shown to miss the diagnosis of insulin resistance in 41 to 50 percent of the cases.[3],[4] Several studies demonstrate that fasting glucose levels should be less than 87 mg/dL.[5],[6] Anything above that is borderline and suggests insulin resistance, and most likely the cause of fatigue, low energy, more belly fat, sugar cravings, and difficulty with weight loss. You see, blood sugar should neither be too high in the morning nor go up and down excessively. For healthy weight and energy, your body needs to use glucose while keeping your serum blood sugar relatively stable. Fortunately, Louisa was Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: A Cardiac Risk Factor?

Blood Sugar: A Cardiac Risk Factor?

Study after study has established this fact: The higher your blood sugar, the higher your risk for heart disease. The extreme instance of high blood sugars contributing to heart disease can be found, of course, in people with diabetes. But you don’t have to be diabetic for blood sugar to act as a coronary risk factor. In fact, blood sugar can be well below the diabetic range yet contribute to increased risk. Take the 33-year long, 18,000-participant Whitehall Study of male British civil servants. All participants were given 50 grams of glucose and blood sugar measured 2 hours later. What blood sugar after the glucose challenge was associated with increased heart attack? An incredible 83 mg/dl. Interestingly, much of the increased risk from higher blood sugars did not become evident until 5-10 years after the study began, seen because of the unusually long timeline of the observation. It also suggests that studies conducted over shorter periods might not fully reveal the cardiovascular risk of high blood sugars. How about fasting blood sugar? The Baltimore Longitudinal Aging Study and the Hoorn Study both showed that risk begins to increase at a fasting blood sugar of 93 mg/dl, increasing sharply at 110 mg/dl and above. Blood sugars as low as 110 mg/dl are associated with other coronary risk factors, including inflammatory measures like C-reactive protein. Even the conservative American Diabetes Association (ADA) labels blood sugars above 100 mg/dL “impaired fasting glucose.” If you are concerned about your blood sugar, it is an easy matter nowadays to check your own blood sugar. (See my prior post, You don’t have to be diabetic to check your blood sugar.) You can check blood sugars first thing in the morning (“fasting”) or 1-2 hours after a meal (“postpran Continue reading >>

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

You Can Lower Your Blood Sugar

You Can Lower Your Blood Sugar

What are normal blood sugar levels? Blood sugar is measured using the metric measurement of milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated mg/dl. In general, someone without diabetes has a fasting blood sugar level less than 110 mg/dl, according to experts at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, Massachusetts. What is fasting? A fasting blood sugar measurement is the proportion of sugar in your blood after you have not eaten for eight hours, or first thing when you wake up in the morning. If you have diabetes, you should aim for a pre-breakfast measurement in the 70 to 130 mg/dl range. Your healthy blood sugar levels vary throughout the day. For most people with diabetes, blood sugar levels should be below 180 mg/dl about two hours after a meal, and between 150 and 180 mg/dl before you go to bed, according to diabetes experts at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. How low can you go? Blood sugar levels are personal, and you can feel good about your success in lowering your own blood sugar. You are not in competition with your cousin or your colleague. Many factors, including your age and other medical conditions (even having a cold), affect your blood sugar levels, and it's easy to get frustrated when you think you are doing all the right things and the numbers aren't going down. But don't give up; think about the big picture. Take positive steps each day to lower your blood sugar and you'll reap the long-term benefits of a healthy life. Remember that you are not alone. Network with others for support and tips for lowering your blood sugar. Pricking Points Keep these tips in mind and you can make lowering your blood sugar simple and efficient. Find your prime time. Because blood sugar is affected by what and when you eat, try testing at different times of the day and befor Continue reading >>

Easy Tips For Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Easy Tips For Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

By Dr Christiane Northrup Blood sugar imbalances are associated with a host of symptoms and health problems, including type II diabetes, unexplained fatigue, extra weight around the middle and mood disturbances. One of the reasons for the rampant rise in type-2 diabetes is that the range for normal blood sugar is too high (1). This explains why many people have symptoms, like extra weight around the middle and unexplained fatigue, for years before they are diagnosed. Now that I’ve shared this important information, I also want to offer ways for you to solve the puzzle. Before you make any changes, you have to know what you’re dealing with. (Of course this is true of any health concern.) Start By Checking Your Blood Sugar Start by checking your blood sugar with a glucometer for at least a few days and under different conditions. This will show the link between your lifestyle, your emotions, and your blood pressure. The glucometer then becomes a biofeedback device! (And you can’t kid yourself about what’s really happening.) Start by checking your blood sugar first thing in the morning, before you eat. If you find that it’s elevated to 100 mg/dL or so, then follow my “prescription” below. If your blood sugar is normal, start to incorporate the tips below, little by little, to avoid problems with sugar as you age. Here Are Some Useful Tips For Promoting Healthy Blood Sugar Levels: 1. Focus On Including Protein At Breakfast If you’re only going to do one thing, then make sure to eat some protein at breakfast every morning. Aim for at least 10 gms. If you’re in a rush, then a low-glycemic shake with protein, such as the Superfood Protein Blend is a good start. When you get protein first thing in the morning, it sets you up for “normal” blood sugar for th Continue reading >>

There Is Hope For Diabetics

There Is Hope For Diabetics

IMPORTANT NOTICE: This is a revised article. The information obtained in this article was from data collected from 8/6-8/19. A few days after the data was collected, the test subject, Hope Cavallo, ran out of Pondera, and would order Pondera immediately once she saw the results of spiked blood sugar levels from not taking it. After you read through the article, please see what happened to Hope’s readings once she was out of Pondera. In the case of Hope Cavallo, the readings proved that Pondera lowered her blood sugar levels and helped sustain them throughout the day. Pondera Wellness is an all-natural dietary supplement that is seeing successful achievements in helping to lower diabetic insulin and blood sugar levels. One of Pondera’s customers, Hope Cavallo, was having serious complications due to her diabetic state, along with her struggles of obesity. Her battle with obesity had her at 310 lbs, and she is only 5’4”. She was put on heavy diabetic medication, and was taking a drug called Metformin twice a day at 1000mg in the morning and another 1000mg at night. 1000mg is only 1/5 of a teaspoon, which seems like a very small amount, but can pack a powerful punch. Due to being overweight, along with the complications of being a severe diabetic, Hope was told that she needed to lose weight immediately and that surgery was a must, therefore, would have to endure a gastric bypass surgery. The surgery took off 140 lbs and brought her weight down to 170 lbs. The great news was that a lot of the weight had been taken away, but unfortunately her diabetes remained severe and she had to stay on her diabetic medicated dosage regimen. After some time passed and she had recovered from her surgery, Hope was still feeling drained and was often very tired, most likely from her Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

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