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Minimum Fasting Time For Blood Sugar Test

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Fbs (fasting Blood Sugar - Glucose) Test Cost

Fbs (fasting Blood Sugar - Glucose) Test Cost

FBS Test (Fasting Blood Glucose) is a test that measures the body’s inherent capacity to clear glucose. FBS test is used to screen people who are at risk of developing diabetes. Fasting for 8 hours minimum is required before the blood for testing is taken. Once should get FBS (Fasting Glucose) test done if she is pregnant or is above 45yrs of age. This test is more accurate than RBS (random blood sugar) test because there is no chance that the level of glucose in blood has been influenced by recent food intake. FBS test is done when the blood sugar needs to be tested, as part of routine health checks or during pregnancy. If someone has symptoms of high blood glucose such as Fatigue, Increased thirst, blurring of vision. If someone has symptoms of low blood glucose such as Anxiety, hunger, blurred vision, sweating, confusion. If someone has medical conditions such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, obesity, high cholesterol level. As part of a routine health check-up, FBS test is recommended every once a year after the age of 40 and once every 2 years from ages 28-40. FBS test results in itself cannot completely diagnose diabetes, although they do help in monitoring when pre-diabetes has set in. Other tests like HbA1c must be done in conjunction with FBS test to check the long-term glycemic index or if Diabetic, then glucose control is checked periodically. RSB test (Random Blood sugar) is also done when fasting is not possible or other tests are inconclusive. It is best to let a doctor evaluate the FBS test results especially when they fall under the dubious ranges. But if all these tests show an elevated glucose, you may need to start treatment for Diabetes as soon as possible. Can I test myself at home for blood glucose? There is no reason to test blood Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Tests

Blood Sugar Tests

A test that measures blood sugar levels. Elevated levels are associated with diabetes and insulin resistance, in which the body cannot properly handle sugar (e.g. obesity). Goal values: Less than 100 mg/dL = normal Between 110–125 mg/dL = impaired fasting glucose (i.e., prediabetes) Greater than 126 mg/dL on two or more samples = diabetes Preparation This test requires a 12-hour fast. You should wait to eat and/or take a hypoglycemic agent (insulin or oral medication) until after test has been drawn, unless told otherwise. Eating and digesting foods called carbohydrates forms glucose (blood sugar). Glucose is needed by your body to provide energy to carry out your normal activities. Insulin is needed by the body to allow glucose to go into the cells and be used as energy. Without insulin, the levels of glucose in the blood will rise. Diabetes is a disease that occurs when either the pancreas (an organ in your body) is not able to produce insulin or the pancreas makes insulin, but it does not work as it should. Fasting blood sugar is a part of diabetic evaluation and management. An FBS greater than 126 mg/dL on more than one occasion usually indicates diabetes. Glycosylated Hemoglobin or Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) Reflects average blood sugar levels over the preceding 90-day period. Elevated levels are associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Individuals with diabetes have an increased risk of a cardiac event. A diabetic person's risk for heart attack is the same as a non-diabetic person, who has experienced one heart attack, having a second heart attack. Aggressive global preventive risk reduction efforts, such as lower LDL targets, diet, exercise and blood pressure control, are recommended. Goal values (per American Diabetes Association guidelines): A range of 5.7-6.4 p Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Fasting, as the name suggests, means refraining from eating of drinking any liquids other than water for eight hours. It is used as a test for diabetes. After fasting, a carbohydrate metabolism test is conducted which measures blood glucose levels. Glucagon during fasting When fasting the hormone glucagon is stimulated and this increases plasma glucose levels in the body. If a patient doesn’t have diabetes, their body will produce insulin to rebalance the increased glucose levels. However people with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin to rebalance their blood sugar (typically in type 1 diabetes) or their body is not able to use the insulin effectively enough (typical of type 2 diabetes). Consequently when blood glucose levels are tested, people with diabetes will have blood sugar levels significantly higher than people who do not have diabetes. What is the fasting blood sugar test used for? The fasting blood sugar test is also used to test the effectiveness of different medication or dietary changes on people already diagnosed as diabetic. Fasting tests The fasting test should be conducted on two separate occasions to ensure consistent results and in order to avoid a false diagnosis. This is the case as increased blood glucose levels may be as a result of Cushing’s syndrome liver or kidney disease, eclampsia and pancreatitis. However many of these conditions are often picked up in lab diagnostic tests. Fasting test results The results of a fasting test with respect to glucose levels in the body are as follows: Normal: 3.9 to 5.5 mmols/l (70 to 100 mg/dl) Prediabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance: 5.6 to 7.0 mmol/l (101 to 126 mg/dl) Diagnosis of diabetes: more than 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) The American Diabetes Association reduced the level of diagno Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Fasting For Blood Tests

Fasting For Blood Tests

It's the morning of your bloodwork and your doctor said to fast before the test. But your stomach is growling and you have serious caffeine withdrawal hours before you roll up your sleeve. A bite of toast and a few gulps of coffee won't really make a difference, right? Not so fast. Your results could come back wrong if you give in to temptation. Fasting means you don't eat or drink anything but water usually for 8 to 12 hours beforehand. So, if your appointment is at 8 a.m. and you're told to fast for 8 hours, only water is okay after midnight. If it's a 12-hour fast, avoid food and drink after 8 p.m. the night before. You also shouldn't smoke, chew gum (even sugarless), or exercise. These things can rev up your digestion, and that can affect your results. Take your prescription medications unless your doctor tells you to skip them. But ask your doctor before you take any over-the-counter drugs. Blood tests help doctors check for certain health problems and find out how well your body is working. Doctors also use them to figure out how well treatments are working. You don't need to fast before all blood tests. Your doctor will tell you if you need to. These tests typically require fasting: Fasting blood glucose measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood to test for diabetes or prediabetes. Typical fasting time: At least 8 hours Lipid profile is used to check the level of cholesterol and other blood fats. High levels put you at risk for developing heart disease or having a stroke. Typical fasting time: 9-12 hours Basic or comprehensive metabolic panel is often part of a routine physical. The tests check your blood sugar, electrolyte and fluid balance, and kidney function. The comprehensive test checks your liver function, too. Typical fasting time: 10-12 hours Continue reading >>

Patient Preparation For Blood Tests

Patient Preparation For Blood Tests

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- One of the most important factors in determining the accuracy and reliability of your lab test is you, THE PATIENT. After all, it is a sample from your body (blood, urine, or some other specimen), on which the test will be performed. Therefore, it is essential that you do the following to ensure that the results will be useful and interpreted correctly by your doctor: It should be noted that many tests require no special preparation. But for those that do, be certain to adhere to the instructions provided. VARIOUS TEST PREPARATIONS: Please note : For fasting patient, one can have as much water as he/she wants, but no other drinks or food intake is allowed 1) LIPID PROFILE Patient should fast for 12 hours before blood collection. Fasting should be no food or drink except for water. 2) BLOOD GLUCOSE Fasting blood sugar (FBS) For a fasting blood sugar test, do not eat or drink anything other than water for at least 8 hours before the blood sample is taken. If you have diabetes, your doctor may ask you to wait until you have had your blood collected before taking your morning dose of insulin or diabetes medicine. 2-hour Postprandial (post lunch) blood sugar: For a 2-hour postprandial test, you need to have your blood collected exactly 2 hours after a regular lunch. e.g. If Mr. Shah has started his lunch at 12.00 noon he needs to complete his blood collection at 2.00 pm. Mr. Shah will require to reach the lab at 1.50 pm, i.e. 10 minutes early to avoid registration delays. Also Mr. Shah cannot have any food between 12.00 noon and 2.00 p.m. time period. He can have water and his usual medicines. Random blood sugar (RBS): No special preparation i Continue reading >>

New Guidelines Simplify Cholesterol Tests: No Fasting Needed

New Guidelines Simplify Cholesterol Tests: No Fasting Needed

I’m supposed to have my cholesterol checked soon. It’s a simple test, but I’m not looking forward to it since it requires fasting overnight. And that means making a special early-morning trip to my doctor’s office. But new international guidelines say it’s OK — even preferred — to skip the overnight fast. To learn more about this small but oh-so-useful shift, I talked with cardiologist Dr. Samia Mora. She helped write the new guidelines, which were published this week in the European Heart Journal and summarized in JAMA Internal Medicine. Mora is director of the Center for Lipid Metabolomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. What was the point of fasting before having a cholesterol test? Not eating for eight to 12 hours before having blood drawn for a cholesterol test was thought to give a more accurate assessment of total cholesterol, harmful LDL cholesterol, protective HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides, a type of fat-carrying particle. We now know better. One problem with fasting is that we spend most of the day in the nonfasting state, so the way cholesterol tests are currently done doesn’t necessarily give a clear picture of “normal” levels. Another is that fasting is a hassle for everyone concerned — patients, clinicians, and even lab workers. What’s behind the new recommendation? This change has been coming for some time. It is driven by data from a dozen-plus studies that include more than 300,000 people whose cholesterol and other lipids were measured when they hadn’t fasted. Their levels predicted cardiovascular risk, as well as, or possibly better than, fasting lipid levels. Nonfasting levels might be better? After you eat, your digestive system converts some of the carbo Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is essential to your mental and physical health. The normal blood sugar levels chart below shows the range to shoot for and the diabetes blood sugar levels chart shows levels to avoid. What is blood sugar? It’s the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream that your body uses to produce energy. For most people, normal blood sugar levels range from 80 up to 140 – naturally fluctuating throughout the day. A healthy body has effective ways of regulating normal blood sugar levels. For example, if your blood sugar falls too low, extra glucose stored in your liver is absorbed into your bloodstream to make up the difference. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart Blood sugar is the fuel your body needs for energy. Insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, helps you maintain normal blood sugar levels. This blood sugar levels chart below shows a normal blood sugar range. Range of Normal Blood Sugar Levels Chart TIMING OF BLOOD SUGAR NORMAL RANGE (mg/dl) When you wake (before eating) 80 to 120 Before eating a meal 80 to 120 Taken 2 hours after eating Less than 140 Bedtime blood sugar range 100 to 140 Eating high glycemic carbohydrates is the main cause of higher than normal blood sugar levels and can lead to heart disease, diabetes, blindness, kidney disease and limb amputation from gangrene. Very high blood sugar can even lead to a diabetic coma. The chart below compares diabetes blood sugar levels to normal blood sugar levels. Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels vs Normal Blood Sugar Levels BLOOD SUGAR CLASSIFICATION FASTING MINIMUM FASTING MAXIMUM 2 HOURS AFTER EATING Normal Blood Sugar 70 120 Less than 140 Early Diabetes 100 125 140 to 200 Established Diabetes Over 125 Over 125 More than 200 *All numbers are mg/dl. How to Use Your Blood Sugar Lev Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

Everything You Need To Know About Fasting Before A Blood Test

How do you prepare for a blood test? Some blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. In these cases, your doctor will instruct you not to eat or drink anything, except water, in the hours leading up to the test. Fasting before certain blood tests is important to help make sure that your test results are accurate. The vitamins, minerals, fats, carbohydrates, and proteins that make up all food and beverages can impact blood-level readings, clouding the results of your test. Not all blood tests will require you to fast beforehand. Blood tests that you will likely need to fast for include: renal function panel lipoprotein panel If your doctor has prescribed a new blood test for you, or doesn’t mention whether or not you should fast or for how long, ask them if fasting is required. Some tests, such as a fecal occult blood test, don’t require fasting but do limit certain foods. Red meats, broccoli, and even some medications may cause a false positive test. Always follow your doctor’s advice when preparing for a test. The amount of time you need to fast for will vary depending on the test. For most tests, you will be told not to consume anything but water for eight hours leading up to the test. For a few tests, a 12-hour fast may be needed. Schedule your test as early in the day as possible. The hours you spend sleeping are considered part of the fasting period, as long as you don’t break your fast with coffee or food once you’re awake. Even if you drink it black, coffee can interfere with blood test results. That’s because it contains caffeine and soluble plant matter, which might skew your test results. Coffee is also a diuretic, which means that it will increase how much you pee. This can have a dehydrating effect. The less hydrated you are, the harder it Continue reading >>

6 To 12 Hr Fasting Blood Test List, Fasting Before Blood Test Explained

6 To 12 Hr Fasting Blood Test List, Fasting Before Blood Test Explained

Fasting blood test is a lab test requires a fasting period from eating, drinking, and some medications to get accurate results, here is a list of most fasting and non-fasting blood tests, other non-blood tests have other guidelines. Why fasting before blood test? Fasting for a blood test means you’re abstaining from eating, drinking, smoking, taking pills for a certain period of time depending on each test rules, fasting is to avoid interference (in general) of some substances in our food and drinks with the substance being tested, and enhance the test accuracy. How to Prepare yourself prior taking a blood test? 3 things you should know before going to lab: Which is the best time to take a blood test? Does test require fasting before blood test sampling or other procedures? Can I eat and drink before having a blood test? If no fasting, the test results can be wrong? Yes, fasting for some tests is crucial to get correct results which represent your actual condition, however Can I drink coffee or tea when fasting for blood test? No, for glucose test any drinks contain sugar will affect the final results. What should be fasting for? To abstain from eating and drinking only, or to refrain from certain types of food only, to abstain from alcohol only, refrain from certain types of medications only, or general fasting from everything, other people questions like this: How long to fast before blood test? 6 to 12 hours is usually requested, however each blood test has a special fasting times and certain fasting rules, the following fasting tests chart highlights some fasting rules and the proper fasting time before blood test sampling. I can’t fast too long before a blood test, what should I do? Some individuals can’t fasting before blood test sampling like the Patients o Continue reading >>

Relationship Of Fasting And Hourly Blood Glucose Levels To Hba1c Values

Relationship Of Fasting And Hourly Blood Glucose Levels To Hba1c Values

Safety, accuracy, and improvements in glucose profiles obtained using a 7-day continuous glucose sensor Abstract OBJECTIVE—In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of 7-day transcutaneous, real-time, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in subjects with insulin-requiring diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Eighty-six subjects were enrolled at five U.S. centers. Subjects wore a sensor inserted under the skin of the abdomen for 7 days during each of three consecutive periods. Data were blinded during period 1 and unblinded during periods 2 and 3. RESULTS—Of the 6,811 matched self-monitoring of blood glucose to sensor values prospectively analyzed, 97.2% fell in the Clarke error grid zones A and B, and median absolute relative difference was 11.4%. After unblinding, subjects reduced time spent at <55 mg/dl by 0.3 h/day, reduced time spent at >240 mg/dl by 1.5 h/day, and increased time in the target zone (81–140 mg/dl) by 1.4 h/day (P < 0.05 for all three comparisons). Improvements were seen in both types 1 and 2 diabetes and with use of both multiple daily injections and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Modal day graphs were generated in six groups of subjects based on HbA1c (A1C) (≤6, 6–7, 7–8, 8–9, 9–10, and >10%). Mean glucose levels from midnight to 7:00 a.m. (fasting and dawn phenomenon periods) were only normal for subjects with A1C ≤6%. All other groups were hyperglycemic during this and all periods. Reductions in overall mean glucose were achieved for the four highest A1C groupings with unblinded device use. CONCLUSIONS—This is the first report of a real-time, transcutaneous glucose sensor that functioned for 7 days. The use of CGM in the unblinded phase resulted in improvements in target-range glycemia across all A1C valu Continue reading >>

Glucose - Blood

Glucose - Blood

Source Blood Mnemonic Fasting: GLUF (Prompt: enter hours fasting) Random: GLU Specimen Requirements 1 x 3 mL or 4.5 mL light green (mint) top PST tube. Gold top SST tube also acceptable. 0.2 mL plasma or serum Minimum Whole Blood Volumes for Microcollections Fasting Glucose requires a fast of at least 8 hours, but not more than 16 hours. CLS Staff: For fasting glucose, if patient is not fasting (or has not been fasting for 8 hours): PSC and Outpatients: order GLU and collect the specimen. Enter hours fasting into the LIS. Note: this does not apply to Glucose Tolerance Test, in which a fasting specimen is required. Inpatients: consult with nursing unit. Specimen Handling Record time of collection on requisition and on specimen tube. MUST be centrifuged within 2 hours of collection to ensure accurate results. Additional Information For Diabetes Clinical Practice Guidelines, please see Canadian Diabetes Assn. C.P.G. Testing Location Chemistry-All Sites Rural: CRL Testing Frequency Daily Alternate Name(s) FBS (Fasting Blood Sugar) Reference Interval Fasting Less than 30 days 2.5 - 5.5 mmol/L 30 days – 150 years 3.3 - 6.0 mmol/L Random Less than 30 days 2.5 - 11.0 mmol/L 30 days – 150 years 3.3 - 11.0 mmol/L Click here for critical values. Continue reading >>

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

The Best Time To Check Blood Glucose After A Meal

Q: I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Should I check my blood glucose two hours from when I start eating or after I finish eating my meal? A: Most of the food you consume will be digested and raises blood glucose in one to two hours. To capture the peak level of your blood glucose, it is best to test one to two hours after you start eating. The American Diabetes Association recommends a target of below 180 mg/dl two hours after a meal. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommends a lower target: below 140 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Ask your doctor which target is right for you. Postmeal blood glucose monitoring (and record-keeping) is important because it helps you see how your body responds to carbohydrates in general and particular foods. Managing postmeal blood glucose can help reduce your risk of developing heart and circulation problems. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

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