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Millet Use In Diabetes

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Tracey Roizman, DC is a writer and speaker on natural and preventive health care and a practicing chiropractor. She also holds a B.S. in nutritional biochemistry. A box of millet.Photo Credit: DAJ/amana images/Getty Images Millet is actually a group of related plants that produce small pearl-like grains and not a single plant. Millet is low in essential amino acids and higher than most grains in fat content, 75 percent of which is heart-healthy polyunsaturated fat. Millet has been shown to be potentially beneficial in the management of diabetes. Millet may make a good substitute for rice for some diabetics, according to Peter Belton, author of the book "Pseudocereals and Less Common Cereals: Grain Properties and Utilization Potential." Millet's high fiber content slows digestion and releases sugar into the bloodstream at a more even pace. This helps diabetics avoid dangerous spikes in blood sugar that lead to glucose spilling over into the urine, known as glucosuria. Millet also contains high quantities of methionine, an amino acid that is deficient in most grains, giving millet a valuable place in a vegetarian diet. Researchers at the department of biological chemistry and food science, faculty of agriculture, Iwate University, Japan reported that a high-fat diet containing 20 percent millet protein for three weeks significantly decreased glucose and triglyceride levels and increased levels of adiponectin -- a substance secreted by fat cells that regulates appetite -- in laboratory animals. Millet also increased levels of high-density lipoprotein, HDL, the good form of cholesterol. The researchers concluded that millet may potentially be useful at managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetes. The study was published in the February 2009 is Continue reading >>

What Grain Is Suitable For A Type 2 Diabetic? Is Millet Better Than Wheat?

What Grain Is Suitable For A Type 2 Diabetic? Is Millet Better Than Wheat?

Robert Rister , Author of Healing without Medication Answered 62w ago Author has 5.4k answers and 7.2m answer views Wheat gets a bad rap. About 0.3% of the population has an autoimmune reaction to the gliadin in wheat protein (gluten). That means 99.7% of us dont. However, there are dozens of genes that can cause an inflammatory reaction to wheat in belly fat. Inflamed fat cells arent as able to receive sugar from the bloodstream, so wheat (and also potatoes and oats) can interfere with blood sugar control. However, its the carbohydrate from grains that is the bigger problem. All grains need to be limited, even millet and teff and quinoa (which actually isnt a grain). Most type 2 diabetics can tolerate a serving or so of grain of any kind per meal, but most type 2 diabetics dont stop with that amount. If its hard to get millet and you dont really know how to cook it, youll eat lessand its eating less that really makes the difference for you. All grains turn to glucose in the bloodstream so if youre concerned with T2D then avoid them. As a T2 diabetics myself, I know first hand that is easier said than done. To put it in another perspective, I shoot for around 50 grams of carbs total for the day to keep my blood sugars in a good range. This is critical as I dont take meds. Just this evening I had a turkey, bacon and cheese sandwich. The whole grain bread which is on the thicker side equaled 40 grams of carbs. Do you see how my 50 grams went out the window so quick? Continue reading >>

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Go to: Type 2 Diabetes Overview and Associated Complications Diabetes is a chronic disease that is characterized by high level of blood glucose also known as hyperglycaemia. According to WHO 2015 published figure1, 9% of the world population aged 18 and above has contracted diabetes and an estimated 1.5 million deaths per year are attributed to diabetes directly. It is well known that glucose level of a diabetic patient increases dramatically beyond the normal range after a meal. It is also true that their blood glucose level would soon drop as the body failed to store the excess glucose for later use. Diabetes is classified into Types 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes as the patients’ pancreas cannot produce or produces little insulin and often presents itself from childhood (Diabetes.co.uk, 2016c). Type 2 diabetes (T2D), however, often first appears in adults when the body becomes resistant to insulin or fails to make sufficient amounts of insulin (Martin et al., 1992; Weyer et al., 2001). T2D comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world (NHS choice, 2014). This can largely be the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Added complication to T2D is that it presents less marked symptoms than Type 1 diabetes and is often diagnosed only when complications have already arisen. Major complications caused by hyperglycaemia include atherosclerosis that hardens and narrows the blood vessels. Other diabetes-related complications are heart disease, stroke, retinopathy, and kidney failure (Bitzur et al., 2009; Sone et al., 2011). Diabetic retinopathy leads to blindness by causing cumulative damage to the small blood vessels in the retina and contributes to 1% blindness globally. Similarly, kidney f Continue reading >>

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What makes millets a super food for diabetics Millets are not just bird seed, but the secret to enjoying your grains while staying gluten free, keeping your blood sugar low and accelerating weight loss Millets are tiny seeds of the grass family that originated in Africa and Asia. Consumed traditionally in South India, these easy to cook goodies are nutritious, cultivated with less water, are pest resistant and therefore environment friendly. They come at a marginally higher expense but are richer in protein, fat, fibre and other nutrients than grains like wheat and rice. Millets are a powerhouse of the following nutrients: Fibre offers satiety therefore is a good choice to manage blood sugars and diabetes Beta-glucan [soluble fibre] lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Resistant starch helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut Bran is not digested and aids easy bowel movement preventing constipation Millets contain higher amounts of protein in comparison to rice and wheat. Typically grains lack an essential amino acid called lysine. Finger and foxtail millet contains more lysine. High protein content increases serotonin which is a feel good factor and it helps to induce sleep B vitamins, B3, B6, and folic acid makes one feel energetic Magnesium is an anti-stress mineral and together with potassium helps to reduce blood pressure and boosts heart health Calcium and phosphorus are good for bone health, however the absorption of calcium may be not be optimal due to the presence of anti-nutrients like phytates, phenols, enzyme inhibitors and tanins Iron is vital for stamina and its absorption in finger millet [ragi] can be enhanced by malting. Most of the common food items prepared with rice or wheat can be replaced with millets either partly or whole. Millets contain Continue reading >>

Foxtail Millet Good For Diabetes Patients

Foxtail Millet Good For Diabetes Patients

Foxtail millet good for diabetes patients After State subsidises rice, people switch from millet to rice The area under which minor millets is grown is shrinking year after year in Kurnool district as has been the trend elsewhere in State. Foxtail millet (Sataria italica), which used to be cultivated in an area of two lakh hectare in the district two decades ago has now shrunk to 20,000 hectare. The millet, known as Korra in local parlance, remains to be the staple diet of rural people. However, after the introduction of the subsidised rice scheme in the early eighties, people switched over to rice and the demand started declining for millet. However, of late, the importance of foxtail millet was recognised as diabetic food. The millet is rich in dietary fibre (6.7 per cent), protein (11 per cent) and low in fat (four per cent). Unlike rice, foxtail millet releases glucose steadily without affecting the metabolism of the body. The incidence of diabetes is rare among the population which consumes foxtail millet diet. According to G. Narasimha Rao, former scientist of Agriculture University, foxtail millet is a versatile crop which can be grown in any season of the year with the shortest crop cycle of 60 to 90 days. No other food crop can be grown in such a short period. Considering the importance of the millet in Kurnool district, the government has sanctioned a research centre for the district, which is located at Nandyal. So far, the centre has released new varieties of the millet such as Nallama Korra, Krishnadevaraya, Narasimharaya, Srilakshi and Suryanandi. Srilakshmi, which gave a yield of 14 quintal per acre this year has been popular among farmers. The duration of Suryanandi was reduced to 60 days which could be accommodated in any season. The foxtail millet gra Continue reading >>

Millets For Controlling Sugar Levels

Millets For Controlling Sugar Levels

Recently I met an Indian homoeopathy doctor who organizes workshops on diabetic awareness. He is more interested in treating people with just food rather than homoeopathic medicines. He advices to replace rice and wheat (mostly all sorts of sugars) with five types of millets which can bring down Hba1c to greater extent (~6). I was surprised to see few reports showing the results. In Bangalore (Karnataka-India) Millets foods are becoming popular these days. Millets contain goitrogens. Goitrogens suppress thyroid activity and can lead to goiter. While the goitrogens in foods are usually reduced by cooking (such as cruciferous vegetables), cooking actually increases the goitrogenic effect of millet! Protect your thyroid at all costs! It is a real challenge to unwind the effects of hypothyroidism once this vital gland is weakened or enlarged. Dont take any chances with your thyroid health by consuming large amounts of millet. Eat millets in moderation. surprised to know about millets. Millets are poor people's bread. Our previous generations just a few decades back ate lots of millets. Never knew hypothyroid was rampent in those days. Even in the present time millets loaf is an important item of dinner menu in many families including my family . With cereal or a vegetable and surely with milk. pearl millet/bajra nu rotlo ane ringni nu bhrato or bhrava ringani was staple diet in rural Gujarat. Even now days there are many dhaba/jalram Dhaba serve that in Ahmedabad. Glycemic index of Bajra is very high i.e. 71 But surprisingly when I had bajra nu rotlo at dinner...my morning fasting sugar was in very much control. Guess this is all due to modified grains.... We Indians always consumed whole grains.....but modified grains.... Gujju food is really very good and tasty....guess Continue reading >>

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Since learning that two slices of wheat bread can raise blood sugar levels higher than a candy bar, many diabetics tend to avoid it. In fact, in order to stay ahead of the blood-sugar game that many diabetics have to play, many are discovering that their bodies actually feel better when they’re not eating wheat. While this can be due to an additional underlying viral condition that comes along with their disease, the point remains that it’s another food they can’t eat and this can become frustrating. While already feeling limited in their dietary intake, and like they’re left without a choice in the world after avoiding wheat, many diabetics feel hopeless that there are alternatives. This in turn can raise their stress levels and actually raise their blood sugar along with it. The Name Of The Game Is Keeping The Blood Sugar Down Regulating blood sugar levels is what’s on every diabetics mind, and it can make mealtimes stressful. Eating shouldn’t be stressful. In an attempt to figure out what they can eat, diabetics have finally found magic in Millet. Millet is as versatile as rice, without the blood sugar surge. A study done in India comparing the glycemic index of rice dosa (a type of pancake made from a fermented batter that is somewhat similar to a crepe) to millet dosas, has shown to have promising health benefits for diabetics when it comes to blood sugar levels. Advertisement The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients who have type-2 diabetes, in order to “estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of their meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. The participants aged between thirty-five a Continue reading >>

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research Foxtail millet is a good breakfast option. A recent study suggests that replacing the rice in the usual dosa can be... Thalipeeth is rich in iron, calcium, magnesium, complex carbs and high in fibre. It is a perfect one dish meal that... Millets contain complex carbohydrates and rich in fibre, contain essential amino acid lysine, are gluten free and are... Dr Geetanjali Bhide is an eminent nutritionist, researcher, academician, writer, speaker who believes in bringing millets back on platter for their many health benefits. One small change that can make a huge difference Foxtail millet also known as navane or ral is a highly nutritious millet that renders many health benefits. It is rich in good quality proteins, minerals, dietary fibre and antioxidants. Foxtail can be a used as a good breakfast substitute. A recent study suggests that replacing the rice in the usual dosa can be extremely effective way to prevent rise in blood sugar levels in Type 2 diabetics. Dosa and Idlis made with rice and urad dal are the staple breakfast menus in South India. One small change that is use of foxtail millet instead of polished rice in dosas can make a huge difference. The foxtail millet dosa was found to be beneficial in treatment of Type 2 diabetes in many ways- Foxtail millet with its high fibre content has a higher satiety index. It is rich in minerals, proteins and dietary fibre. The high soluble dietary fibre prevents rise in blood sugar levels after meals and blood sugar can be maintained for a long duration. In the long run, regular intake of foxtail millets can also help to control lipid profile and HbA1C levels in diabetic patients. Above all the glycemic index of foxtail dosa was 59.25 and of rice based do Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

Volume 1689, Issue 3 , 4 August 2004, Pages 190-201 The effect of finger millet feeding on the early responses during the process of wound healing in diabetic rats Author links open overlay panel N.S.Rajasekaran In the present study, the role of finger millet feeding on skin antioxidant status, nerve growth factor (NGF) production and wound healing parameters in healing impaired early diabetic rats is reported. Hyperglycemic rats received food containing 50 g/100 g finger millet (FM). Non-diabetic controls and diabetic controls received balanced nutritive diet. Full-thickness excision skin wounds were made after 2 weeks prior feeding of finger millet diet. The rate of wound contraction, and the levels of collagen, hexosamine and uronic acid in the granulation tissue were determined. The skin antioxidant status and lipid peroxide concentration were also monitored during the study. In hyperglycemic rats fed with finger millet diet, the healing process was hastened with an increased rate of wound contraction. Skin levels of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid and -tocopherol in alloxan-induced diabetic rat were lower as compared to non-diabetics. Altered activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also recorded in diabetics. Interestingly, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were elevated in the wound tissues of all the groups, when compared to normal (unwounded) skin tissues. However, in diabetic rats the TBARS levels of both normal and wounded skin tissues were significantly elevated (P<0.001) when compared with control (non-diabetic) and diabetics fed with FM. Impaired production of NGF, determined by ELISA, in diabetic rats was improved upon FM feeding and further confirmed by immunocytochemical observations reflects the increased express Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

Millet And Millet Porridge In Diabetes Mellitus

Millet And Millet Porridge In Diabetes Mellitus

Millet and millet porridge in diabetes mellitus People with the disease of diabetes mellitus, every day must adhere to certain diets, which control the production of sugar in the blood. Depending on the type of diabetes, doctors can develop the best menu that contains the best food for their patients. Among the products recommended for use in case of presence of diabetes is present millet. Millet is quite ancient culture, which has many beneficial properties. Nutritionists safely attributed to the millet grains , which are the least allergenic grains. In addition, millet has a positive effect on the human body in diabetes, because wheat can be eaten regardless of the type of the disease. Even to people suffering from diabetes mellitus of second type that are limiting them in the diet constantly, doctors prescribe millet. It can not only normalize levels of insulin, but also completely get rid of this disease. In case of gestational diabetes, which occurs as a result of hormonal changes during pregnancy, gynecologists strongly recommend to women to eat a daily serving of millet porridge. Millet in diabetes mellitus is useful for the fact that in course of the disease patients have a tendency to gain weight but millet has lipotropic action, so it relates to dietary products, and as result it can be eaten without limitations. For people with diabetes mellitus is recommended consumption of daily spoonful of millet flour and drinking water with it. Useful properties of millet depend primarily on its type; therefore we must be able not only to properly prepare the porridge, but also to choose the rump. Millet may have only familiar yellow color, but also white and gray. The most useful and quality is polished wheat, from which you can cook a crumbly mess, recommended for use Continue reading >>

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millet can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images) From a humble crop that once satiated the poor to the base of a gourmet meal for the health conscious, millets have made a comeback. While flavours of the grain may vary to suit modern palates, a doctor's ideal recipe is still traditional. A research paper has documented this formula and tracked its impact on people with diabetes. The study, undertaken by M V Hospital for Diabetes , found that replacing rice based dosas with ones made of foxtail millet (Thinai) can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients in Chennai diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. "We wanted to estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of the meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. A WHO-ICMR study based on non-communicable diseases' risk factor surveillance showed that the prevalence of diabetes is 10.4% of the population. In summers, diabetes-related emergencies spike by 25%, with many reporting exhaustion and dehydration. The participants surveyed, aged between 35 and 55, were divided into two groups. While one group was given rice dosa for breakfast on one day, the others ate dosas made of millets. Two days later, the plates were swapped be tween the groups. On both days, researchers first measured their fasting blood glucose levels and one and a half hours after breakfast, their levels again.While the glycaemic Continue reading >>

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