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Millet Use In Diabetes

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millet can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images) From a humble crop that once satiated the poor to the base of a gourmet meal for the health conscious, millets have made a comeback. While flavours of the grain may vary to suit modern palates, a doctor's ideal recipe is still traditional. A research paper has documented this formula and tracked its impact on people with diabetes. The study, undertaken by M V Hospital for Diabetes , found that replacing rice based dosas with ones made of foxtail millet (Thinai) can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients in Chennai diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. "We wanted to estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of the meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. A WHO-ICMR study based on non-communicable diseases' risk factor surveillance showed that the prevalence of diabetes is 10.4% of the population. In summers, diabetes-related emergencies spike by 25%, with many reporting exhaustion and dehydration. The participants surveyed, aged between 35 and 55, were divided into two groups. While one group was given rice dosa for breakfast on one day, the others ate dosas made of millets. Two days later, the plates were swapped be tween the groups. On both days, researchers first measured their fasting blood glucose levels and one and a half hours after breakfast, their levels again.While the glycaemic Continue reading >>

Millets For Controlling Sugar Levels

Millets For Controlling Sugar Levels

Recently I met an Indian homoeopathy doctor who organizes workshops on diabetic awareness. He is more interested in treating people with just food rather than homoeopathic medicines. He advices to replace rice and wheat (mostly all sorts of sugars) with five types of millets which can bring down Hba1c to greater extent (~6). I was surprised to see few reports showing the results. In Bangalore (Karnataka-India) Millets foods are becoming popular these days. Millets contain goitrogens. Goitrogens suppress thyroid activity and can lead to goiter. While the goitrogens in foods are usually reduced by cooking (such as cruciferous vegetables), cooking actually increases the goitrogenic effect of millet! Protect your thyroid at all costs! It is a real challenge to unwind the effects of hypothyroidism once this vital gland is weakened or enlarged. Dont take any chances with your thyroid health by consuming large amounts of millet. Eat millets in moderation. surprised to know about millets. Millets are poor people's bread. Our previous generations just a few decades back ate lots of millets. Never knew hypothyroid was rampent in those days. Even in the present time millets loaf is an important item of dinner menu in many families including my family . With cereal or a vegetable and surely with milk. pearl millet/bajra nu rotlo ane ringni nu bhrato or bhrava ringani was staple diet in rural Gujarat. Even now days there are many dhaba/jalram Dhaba serve that in Ahmedabad. Glycemic index of Bajra is very high i.e. 71 But surprisingly when I had bajra nu rotlo at dinner...my morning fasting sugar was in very much control. Guess this is all due to modified grains.... We Indians always consumed whole grains.....but modified grains.... Gujju food is really very good and tasty....guess Continue reading >>

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Eaten as a staple food across many parts of the world, grains exist in our diets in many forms, offering an important source of energy. It’s common knowledge that whole grains are good for us, from rice and wheat, to barley and quinoa. Much of the nutrient goodness of grains are found in the bran and germ of the seed, which is why it’s important to eat grains without these parts being milled off first – this is what the term ‘whole grain’ refers to. Grains in your diet Whole grains are wonderfully versatile – add them to salads for texture, bulk up a soup or stew, blend them in burgers or use directly as a meat alternative, or combine them whole in baked goods. They aren’t hard to include in your everyday eating routine and a little whole grain goes a long way! Packed with nutrients What do wholegrains contain? Fibre B vitamins Folic acid Essential fatty acids Protein Antioxidants Micro-nutrients Cooking with grains Cooking most grains is very similar to cooking rice – simply add the dry grain to a pan of water or broth, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed. For a healthy boost of nutrients,experiment with different grains in different forms to bring variety to your meals. Which grain to choose? Amaranth With roughly 60 varieties in total, amaranth is not technically a grain but is of similar nutrition value and usage. These tiny grains have a slightly peppery flavour and can be cooked in water, popped like corn or added to baked goods to increase protein content. Barley For those seeking high fibre, you don’t get much better than barley. Often found as a flour, barley makes a closely textured bread with a slightly sweet flavour. Buckwheat Related to rhubarb, buckwheat is also not a grain as such, but i Continue reading >>

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Tracey Roizman, DC is a writer and speaker on natural and preventive health care and a practicing chiropractor. She also holds a B.S. in nutritional biochemistry. A box of millet.Photo Credit: DAJ/amana images/Getty Images Millet is actually a group of related plants that produce small pearl-like grains and not a single plant. Millet is low in essential amino acids and higher than most grains in fat content, 75 percent of which is heart-healthy polyunsaturated fat. Millet has been shown to be potentially beneficial in the management of diabetes. Millet may make a good substitute for rice for some diabetics, according to Peter Belton, author of the book "Pseudocereals and Less Common Cereals: Grain Properties and Utilization Potential." Millet's high fiber content slows digestion and releases sugar into the bloodstream at a more even pace. This helps diabetics avoid dangerous spikes in blood sugar that lead to glucose spilling over into the urine, known as glucosuria. Millet also contains high quantities of methionine, an amino acid that is deficient in most grains, giving millet a valuable place in a vegetarian diet. Researchers at the department of biological chemistry and food science, faculty of agriculture, Iwate University, Japan reported that a high-fat diet containing 20 percent millet protein for three weeks significantly decreased glucose and triglyceride levels and increased levels of adiponectin -- a substance secreted by fat cells that regulates appetite -- in laboratory animals. Millet also increased levels of high-density lipoprotein, HDL, the good form of cholesterol. The researchers concluded that millet may potentially be useful at managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetes. The study was published in the February 2009 is Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Millets?

Can Diabetics Eat Millets?

For people who are finding a way to reverse type 2 diabetes without taking more pills, drugs or insulin injections, You should try Imodstyle Reverse Diabetes Secrets (please search on google, I dont remember the link). Ive got great results with it. About 1 months ago when I started following that guide my blood sugar count was at 332 and my kidneys were in very poor condition. Just today I was given my results from my last physical and can report that my blood sugar count is 110 and my kidney function is just slightly elevated. By the way, I forgot to mention when I was first diagnosed,... For people who are finding a way to reverse type 2 diabetes without taking more pills, drugs or insulin injections, You should try Imodstyle Reverse Diabetes Secrets (please search on google, I dont remember the link). Ive got great results with it. About 1 months ago when I started following that guide my blood sugar count was at 332 and my kidneys were in very poor condition. Just today I was given my results from my last physical and can report that my blood sugar count is 110 and my kidney function is just slightly elevated. By the way, I forgot to mention when I was first diagnosed, I weighed over 250 pounds and my blood pressure was high. I now weigh 193 pounds and my blood pressure is normal Originally Answered: Can a diabetic person have millets (ragi)? Wheat is not good for many diseases but , millets , oats , black grams , barley and other grains may be beneficial . Wheat chapati is not that beneficial for sugar , asthma and BP patients . But yes wheat grass juice in empty stomach in morning is like amrit for every one . Other grains are easy to digest and do not increase glucose levels and good for health provide minerals and protein . Thanks. For people who are finding a Continue reading >>

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

Composite flour technology denotes to the process of mixing wheat flour with other cereals or legumes to accomplish better quality of available raw material, impart nutritional and functional characteristics. Composite flour prepared by mixing wheat and legumes flour increase the fiber content that results in reduction in cholesterol level and helpful for diabetics. Wheat flour is deficient in amino acid lysine, so high protein composite flours were incorporated in the formulation of product to enhance the nutritional value of wheat flour. It was concluded that composite flour has better nutritional, physiochemical, pasting and therapeutic characteristics than wheat flour alone. Finger millet is among minor cereal grains that are underutilised. However, over the years, research interest in the millet has increased owing to its abundance of bioactive compounds. These compounds which include, among others, ferulic acid-rich arabinoxylans or feraxans, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, and quercetin have been associated with certain health promoting properties and have been found bioaccessible in the grain. Following the recent interest in natural curative substances over their synthetic counterparts in the treatment of food dependent diseases, finger millet has shown potential nutraceutical effects. Some important health effects such as antidiabetic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties have been reported in recent trials with the grain. This review emphasises the dietary fibre - arabinoxylan, and phenolic compounds of finger millet and their properties, and further discusses available evidence on their bioaccessibility and bioactivity. The information presented will further explore the potential of finger millet utilisation, its bioactive compounds, bi Continue reading >>

Foxtail Millet Good For Diabetes Patients

Foxtail Millet Good For Diabetes Patients

Foxtail millet good for diabetes patients After State subsidises rice, people switch from millet to rice The area under which minor millets is grown is shrinking year after year in Kurnool district as has been the trend elsewhere in State. Foxtail millet (Sataria italica), which used to be cultivated in an area of two lakh hectare in the district two decades ago has now shrunk to 20,000 hectare. The millet, known as Korra in local parlance, remains to be the staple diet of rural people. However, after the introduction of the subsidised rice scheme in the early eighties, people switched over to rice and the demand started declining for millet. However, of late, the importance of foxtail millet was recognised as diabetic food. The millet is rich in dietary fibre (6.7 per cent), protein (11 per cent) and low in fat (four per cent). Unlike rice, foxtail millet releases glucose steadily without affecting the metabolism of the body. The incidence of diabetes is rare among the population which consumes foxtail millet diet. According to G. Narasimha Rao, former scientist of Agriculture University, foxtail millet is a versatile crop which can be grown in any season of the year with the shortest crop cycle of 60 to 90 days. No other food crop can be grown in such a short period. Considering the importance of the millet in Kurnool district, the government has sanctioned a research centre for the district, which is located at Nandyal. So far, the centre has released new varieties of the millet such as Nallama Korra, Krishnadevaraya, Narasimharaya, Srilakshi and Suryanandi. Srilakshmi, which gave a yield of 14 quintal per acre this year has been popular among farmers. The duration of Suryanandi was reduced to 60 days which could be accommodated in any season. The foxtail millet gra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: 4 Millet Recipes For A Diabetic-friendly Filling Breakfast

Diabetes Diet: 4 Millet Recipes For A Diabetic-friendly Filling Breakfast

Diabetes Diet: 4 Millet Recipes For A Diabetic-Friendly Filling Breakfast Diabetes Diet: 4 Millet Recipes For A Diabetic-Friendly Filling Breakfast Millets may help diabetics regulate blood sugar levels, due to the presence of high quality carbohydrates, fibre and high levels of protein in them. NDTV Food Desk | Updated: July 21, 2019 13:32 IST Diabetes Diet: This jowar medley is rich in fibre, protein and vitamins (representational image) Breakfast is an important meal for those with erratic blood sugar Millets are rich in protein, fibre, vitamins and minerals Jowar, ragi, bajra etc. can be included in healthy breakfast recipes Breakfast is one of the most important meals of the day, particularly so for those with erratic blood sugar levels. Those with low blood sugar may want to eat a healthy breakfast to prevent critically low levels of glucose in blood. The same goes for those with high blood sugar or hyperglycemia, as for them, eating a healthy and fulfilling breakfast may prevent unhealthy snacking. Millets are food grains that may help diabetics regulate blood sugar levels, due to the presence of high quality carbohydrates, fibre and high levels of protein in them. Millets also have a treasure trove of essential minerals and vitamins, which are important for the smooth functioning of body functions. Bajra or pearl millet is extensively used in Indian kitchens for making flatbreads and a range of snacks. This healthy breakfast roti is a delight for those who have high blood sugar levels and who need to load up on complex carbs. This recipe contains, apart from millets, whole wheat flour, methi leaves, curd and paneer and hence is loaded with good carbs and lean protein. Foxtail millet is known as korra and it can be used to make a satiating porridge that may be c Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What makes millets a super food for diabetics Millets are not just bird seed, but the secret to enjoying your grains while staying gluten free, keeping your blood sugar low and accelerating weight loss Millets are tiny seeds of the grass family that originated in Africa and Asia. Consumed traditionally in South India, these easy to cook goodies are nutritious, cultivated with less water, are pest resistant and therefore environment friendly. They come at a marginally higher expense but are richer in protein, fat, fibre and other nutrients than grains like wheat and rice. Millets are a powerhouse of the following nutrients: Fibre offers satiety therefore is a good choice to manage blood sugars and diabetes Beta-glucan [soluble fibre] lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Resistant starch helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut Bran is not digested and aids easy bowel movement preventing constipation Millets contain higher amounts of protein in comparison to rice and wheat. Typically grains lack an essential amino acid called lysine. Finger and foxtail millet contains more lysine. High protein content increases serotonin which is a feel good factor and it helps to induce sleep B vitamins, B3, B6, and folic acid makes one feel energetic Magnesium is an anti-stress mineral and together with potassium helps to reduce blood pressure and boosts heart health Calcium and phosphorus are good for bone health, however the absorption of calcium may be not be optimal due to the presence of anti-nutrients like phytates, phenols, enzyme inhibitors and tanins Iron is vital for stamina and its absorption in finger millet [ragi] can be enhanced by malting. Most of the common food items prepared with rice or wheat can be replaced with millets either partly or whole. Millets contain Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Since learning that two slices of wheat bread can raise blood sugar levels higher than a candy bar, many diabetics tend to avoid it. In fact, in order to stay ahead of the blood-sugar game that many diabetics have to play, many are discovering that their bodies actually feel better when they’re not eating wheat. While this can be due to an additional underlying viral condition that comes along with their disease, the point remains that it’s another food they can’t eat and this can become frustrating. While already feeling limited in their dietary intake, and like they’re left without a choice in the world after avoiding wheat, many diabetics feel hopeless that there are alternatives. This in turn can raise their stress levels and actually raise their blood sugar along with it. The Name Of The Game Is Keeping The Blood Sugar Down Regulating blood sugar levels is what’s on every diabetics mind, and it can make mealtimes stressful. Eating shouldn’t be stressful. In an attempt to figure out what they can eat, diabetics have finally found magic in Millet. Millet is as versatile as rice, without the blood sugar surge. A study done in India comparing the glycemic index of rice dosa (a type of pancake made from a fermented batter that is somewhat similar to a crepe) to millet dosas, has shown to have promising health benefits for diabetics when it comes to blood sugar levels. Advertisement The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients who have type-2 diabetes, in order to “estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of their meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. The participants aged between thirty-five a Continue reading >>

Birdseed Turned Superfood May Help Curb India’s Diabetes Scourge

Birdseed Turned Superfood May Help Curb India’s Diabetes Scourge

Millets are poised for a comeback amid government subsidies Diabetes may afflict 123.5 million people in India by 2040 Podiatrist Vinaya A.S. has bumped across southern India in a bus-turned mobile clinic for 17 years, going village to village checking feet for the ulcer-causing effects of diabetes. These days, her key to staving off limb amputations comes down to one thing: food. Millets, to be precise. The ancient grains were a staple in India for thousands of years, but largely spurned since a so-called Green Revolution last century led to cheaper, more abundant supplies of refined rice and wheat flour that can bolster blood-sugar. Now a surge in type-2 diabetes is pushing doctors and government officials to recommend a return to wholegrains, like “ragi” or finger millet, that healthfully sustained previous generations. “Food is your medicine — you need to eat right,” Vinaya, 48, told a group of villagers in Doddaballapur, on the outskirts of Bangalore, last month. “Bring the fiber-rich ragi back to your plates, along with fruits and vegetables.” Healthy food choices are becoming critical in India, where diabetes is ripping through the population with deadly consequences. The number of adults living with the disease has risen more than five fold since 1980, though more than half of sufferers aren’t aware they have it. Left uncontrolled, high blood-sugar levels can damage organs and tissues, including the nerves and blood vessels in the feet, making them susceptible to injuries that fail to heal and eventually turn gangrenous. When that happens, amputations can be life-saving. Diabetes Around the World Countries with the largest number of adults with diabetes 1980 2014 Source: Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population Continue reading >>

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

> Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India It might be a major aspect of cultural identity, but the consumption of white rice and other refined grains has led to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in South India. However, diabetes specialists in Bangalore along with dieticians and diabetes educators are digging deep into the rich heritage of millet cuisine of Karnataka to address the issue of a proper food for diabetics. Remember your grandparents and why they had no chronic illnesses or non-communicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)? Apart from the fact that they did not face urbanization, and there was no rampant use of fertilizers and pesticides, the diet they had was diverse. To begin with, most of these people did not consume the varieties of rice we now consume and that rice was not polished. The food they consumed was diverse even though they used to consume local produce and never heard of blueberries, hazelnuts, or the Noni juice of Tahiti. Their diet was full of seasonal vegetables and fruits, lentils, rice, wheat, and of course generous amounts of millets. They used palm jaggery and used sugar sparingly as a treat only during festivals. As the demand for higher agricultural outputs increased, the use of fertilizers and pesticides increased. Moreover, the perceptions of people regarding food changed. Rice was considered as a better food when compared to millets. With the arrival of newer varieties of rice and the increase in its consumption, more and more people fell prey to diabetes. Now, neither our love for rice nor its consumption has reduced. Why does rice consumption increase the risk of diabetes? Many studies and researches have time and aga Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

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