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Millet Use In Diabetes

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Since learning that two slices of wheat bread can raise blood sugar levels higher than a candy bar, many diabetics tend to avoid it. In fact, in order to stay ahead of the blood-sugar game that many diabetics have to play, many are discovering that their bodies actually feel better when they’re not eating wheat. While this can be due to an additional underlying viral condition that comes along with their disease, the point remains that it’s another food they can’t eat and this can become frustrating. While already feeling limited in their dietary intake, and like they’re left without a choice in the world after avoiding wheat, many diabetics feel hopeless that there are alternatives. This in turn can raise their stress levels and actually raise their blood sugar along with it. The Name Of The Game Is Keeping The Blood Sugar Down Regulating blood sugar levels is what’s on every diabetics mind, and it can make mealtimes stressful. Eating shouldn’t be stressful. In an attempt to figure out what they can eat, diabetics have finally found magic in Millet. Millet is as versatile as rice, without the blood sugar surge. A study done in India comparing the glycemic index of rice dosa (a type of pancake made from a fermented batter that is somewhat similar to a crepe) to millet dosas, has shown to have promising health benefits for diabetics when it comes to blood sugar levels. Advertisement The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients who have type-2 diabetes, in order to “estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of their meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. The participants aged between thirty-five a Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

> Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India It might be a major aspect of cultural identity, but the consumption of white rice and other refined grains has led to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in South India. However, diabetes specialists in Bangalore along with dieticians and diabetes educators are digging deep into the rich heritage of millet cuisine of Karnataka to address the issue of a proper food for diabetics. Remember your grandparents and why they had no chronic illnesses or non-communicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)? Apart from the fact that they did not face urbanization, and there was no rampant use of fertilizers and pesticides, the diet they had was diverse. To begin with, most of these people did not consume the varieties of rice we now consume and that rice was not polished. The food they consumed was diverse even though they used to consume local produce and never heard of blueberries, hazelnuts, or the Noni juice of Tahiti. Their diet was full of seasonal vegetables and fruits, lentils, rice, wheat, and of course generous amounts of millets. They used palm jaggery and used sugar sparingly as a treat only during festivals. As the demand for higher agricultural outputs increased, the use of fertilizers and pesticides increased. Moreover, the perceptions of people regarding food changed. Rice was considered as a better food when compared to millets. With the arrival of newer varieties of rice and the increase in its consumption, more and more people fell prey to diabetes. Now, neither our love for rice nor its consumption has reduced. Why does rice consumption increase the risk of diabetes? Many studies and researches have time and aga Continue reading >>

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

Food, an energy reservoir often becomes a hurdle for people living with diabetes who have to consciously eat the right food to keep their blood sugar in check. Refined carbohydrate or sugar rich foods such as Bread, Donuts and tetra pack juices act as culprits whereas fibre and protein rich foods such as whole grains, pulses, oats, barley , millets, nuts , milk, raw veggies and fruits act as saviours. There are studies been done globally to find balanced diet, that can be recommended for diabetics, which is not only tasty but also gives energy boost. One such study reveals, Millets which are natural source of fibre, protein, calcium, magnesium, help control the blood sugar spike. Just replacing refined grains with these tiny but mighty Millets, open a whole new array of diet options for people living with diabetes. Pearl Millet (Bajra), Finger Millet (Ragi), Sorghum (Jowar), Little Millet (Varai, Sanwa) are millets that are easily available locally. Each of them supplements the diet with minerals, fibres, proteins and phytochemicals - the combination of which helps beat diabetes. Besides these nutrients, a non-nutrient yet beneficial component of millet is the fibre in it. Fibre is an indigestible part of food and helps in slow release of sugar into the blood after the breakdown of food, along with improving of insulin sensitivity ie, your body cells respond to the insulin and in turn use up the sugar released into the blood, thereby controlling blood sugar levels. Similar to fibre, proteins also help in controlled and slow release of sugar into the blood. Millets being a rich source of protein and fibre handle the sugar load in body more efficiently. Phytochemicals, found in the bran layers of millet are the non nutrient component commonly found in plant based food. It Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes: Benefits, Nutritional Content, And More

Millet For Diabetes: Benefits, Nutritional Content, And More

Diabetes is a condition where the body either doesnt produce enough insulin or doesnt efficiently use insulin. As a result, the body cant properly process foods for energy. This can increase your blood glucose level, or blood sugar, and lead to dangerous complications if left untreated. Since diabetes affects blood sugar , theres a belief that people with diabetes cant eat sugar or carbohydrates like millet. But while its true that people living with diabetes may have to be more aware of their carb intake to manage their blood sugar, good carbohydrates (particularly complex carbs ) can also help manage diabetes symptoms. Millet, and other whole grain carbohydrates, are loaded with fiber , minerals, and vitamins. They should be included in your diet if you have diabetes. Heres a look at why millet is good for people with diabetes, as well as tips for eating healthy with this condition. Millet is a group of small-seeded grains resembling small pearls. In the United States, some people havent heard of millet, yet its a staple in many parts of the world. Its commonly included in Indian and African dishes. , 300 participants with type 2 diabetes were evaluated after eating foxtail millet for 90 days. The study evaluated millets effect on: After the 90 days, researchers found that millet lowered the groups hemoglobin A1c level by 19.14 percent. A1C is a measurement of your average blood sugar level over 3 months. Fasting glucose was lowered by 13.5 percent, cholesterol by 13.25 percent, and triglycerides by 13.51 percent. These results have led researchers to believe that an intake of millet could have a positive effect on glycemic control and improve cardiovascular risk factors. People living with diabetes also need to be familiar with the glycemic index (GI) and know the G Continue reading >>

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millets in ones diet can help prevent diabetes, says Dr. Vijay Viswanathan. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Prolonged exposure to diabetes damages important organs like the eye, the kidney, the heart and nerves, as the result of damage to small blood vessels. Heredity, obesity, stress, rich diet, and lack of physical activity are some of the causes for diabetes. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problems. Physical activity/exercise helps the muscles convert glucose to energy. But there is a risk of developing hypoglycemia. Shifting to a healthy diet and a brisk walk of more than five hours a week helps keep blood glucose level normal. As far as diet is concerned, millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet (Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil: Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi: Bajra, Tamil: Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi: Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua; Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets ar Continue reading >>

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Eaten as a staple food across many parts of the world, grains exist in our diets in many forms, offering an important source of energy. It’s common knowledge that whole grains are good for us, from rice and wheat, to barley and quinoa. Much of the nutrient goodness of grains are found in the bran and germ of the seed, which is why it’s important to eat grains without these parts being milled off first – this is what the term ‘whole grain’ refers to. Grains in your diet Whole grains are wonderfully versatile – add them to salads for texture, bulk up a soup or stew, blend them in burgers or use directly as a meat alternative, or combine them whole in baked goods. They aren’t hard to include in your everyday eating routine and a little whole grain goes a long way! Packed with nutrients What do wholegrains contain? Fibre B vitamins Folic acid Essential fatty acids Protein Antioxidants Micro-nutrients Cooking with grains Cooking most grains is very similar to cooking rice – simply add the dry grain to a pan of water or broth, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed. For a healthy boost of nutrients,experiment with different grains in different forms to bring variety to your meals. Which grain to choose? Amaranth With roughly 60 varieties in total, amaranth is not technically a grain but is of similar nutrition value and usage. These tiny grains have a slightly peppery flavour and can be cooked in water, popped like corn or added to baked goods to increase protein content. Barley For those seeking high fibre, you don’t get much better than barley. Often found as a flour, barley makes a closely textured bread with a slightly sweet flavour. Buckwheat Related to rhubarb, buckwheat is also not a grain as such, but i Continue reading >>

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Go to: Type 2 Diabetes Overview and Associated Complications Diabetes is a chronic disease that is characterized by high level of blood glucose also known as hyperglycaemia. According to WHO 2015 published figure1, 9% of the world population aged 18 and above has contracted diabetes and an estimated 1.5 million deaths per year are attributed to diabetes directly. It is well known that glucose level of a diabetic patient increases dramatically beyond the normal range after a meal. It is also true that their blood glucose level would soon drop as the body failed to store the excess glucose for later use. Diabetes is classified into Types 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes as the patients’ pancreas cannot produce or produces little insulin and often presents itself from childhood (Diabetes.co.uk, 2016c). Type 2 diabetes (T2D), however, often first appears in adults when the body becomes resistant to insulin or fails to make sufficient amounts of insulin (Martin et al., 1992; Weyer et al., 2001). T2D comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world (NHS choice, 2014). This can largely be the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Added complication to T2D is that it presents less marked symptoms than Type 1 diabetes and is often diagnosed only when complications have already arisen. Major complications caused by hyperglycaemia include atherosclerosis that hardens and narrows the blood vessels. Other diabetes-related complications are heart disease, stroke, retinopathy, and kidney failure (Bitzur et al., 2009; Sone et al., 2011). Diabetic retinopathy leads to blindness by causing cumulative damage to the small blood vessels in the retina and contributes to 1% blindness globally. Similarly, kidney f Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

The Effect Of Finger Millet Feeding On The Early Responses During The Process Of Wound Healing In Diabetic Rats

Volume 1689, Issue 3 , 4 August 2004, Pages 190-201 The effect of finger millet feeding on the early responses during the process of wound healing in diabetic rats Author links open overlay panel N.S.Rajasekaran In the present study, the role of finger millet feeding on skin antioxidant status, nerve growth factor (NGF) production and wound healing parameters in healing impaired early diabetic rats is reported. Hyperglycemic rats received food containing 50 g/100 g finger millet (FM). Non-diabetic controls and diabetic controls received balanced nutritive diet. Full-thickness excision skin wounds were made after 2 weeks prior feeding of finger millet diet. The rate of wound contraction, and the levels of collagen, hexosamine and uronic acid in the granulation tissue were determined. The skin antioxidant status and lipid peroxide concentration were also monitored during the study. In hyperglycemic rats fed with finger millet diet, the healing process was hastened with an increased rate of wound contraction. Skin levels of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid and -tocopherol in alloxan-induced diabetic rat were lower as compared to non-diabetics. Altered activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also recorded in diabetics. Interestingly, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were elevated in the wound tissues of all the groups, when compared to normal (unwounded) skin tissues. However, in diabetic rats the TBARS levels of both normal and wounded skin tissues were significantly elevated (P<0.001) when compared with control (non-diabetic) and diabetics fed with FM. Impaired production of NGF, determined by ELISA, in diabetic rats was improved upon FM feeding and further confirmed by immunocytochemical observations reflects the increased express Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research

Foxtail-millet-a-good-breakfast-food-for-diabetics-recent-research Foxtail millet is a good breakfast option. A recent study suggests that replacing the rice in the usual dosa can be... Thalipeeth is rich in iron, calcium, magnesium, complex carbs and high in fibre. It is a perfect one dish meal that... Millets contain complex carbohydrates and rich in fibre, contain essential amino acid lysine, are gluten free and are... Dr Geetanjali Bhide is an eminent nutritionist, researcher, academician, writer, speaker who believes in bringing millets back on platter for their many health benefits. One small change that can make a huge difference Foxtail millet also known as navane or ral is a highly nutritious millet that renders many health benefits. It is rich in good quality proteins, minerals, dietary fibre and antioxidants. Foxtail can be a used as a good breakfast substitute. A recent study suggests that replacing the rice in the usual dosa can be extremely effective way to prevent rise in blood sugar levels in Type 2 diabetics. Dosa and Idlis made with rice and urad dal are the staple breakfast menus in South India. One small change that is use of foxtail millet instead of polished rice in dosas can make a huge difference. The foxtail millet dosa was found to be beneficial in treatment of Type 2 diabetes in many ways- Foxtail millet with its high fibre content has a higher satiety index. It is rich in minerals, proteins and dietary fibre. The high soluble dietary fibre prevents rise in blood sugar levels after meals and blood sugar can be maintained for a long duration. In the long run, regular intake of foxtail millets can also help to control lipid profile and HbA1C levels in diabetic patients. Above all the glycemic index of foxtail dosa was 59.25 and of rice based do Continue reading >>

What Grain Is Suitable For A Type 2 Diabetic? Is Millet Better Than Wheat?

What Grain Is Suitable For A Type 2 Diabetic? Is Millet Better Than Wheat?

Robert Rister , Author of Healing without Medication Answered 62w ago Author has 5.4k answers and 7.2m answer views Wheat gets a bad rap. About 0.3% of the population has an autoimmune reaction to the gliadin in wheat protein (gluten). That means 99.7% of us dont. However, there are dozens of genes that can cause an inflammatory reaction to wheat in belly fat. Inflamed fat cells arent as able to receive sugar from the bloodstream, so wheat (and also potatoes and oats) can interfere with blood sugar control. However, its the carbohydrate from grains that is the bigger problem. All grains need to be limited, even millet and teff and quinoa (which actually isnt a grain). Most type 2 diabetics can tolerate a serving or so of grain of any kind per meal, but most type 2 diabetics dont stop with that amount. If its hard to get millet and you dont really know how to cook it, youll eat lessand its eating less that really makes the difference for you. All grains turn to glucose in the bloodstream so if youre concerned with T2D then avoid them. As a T2 diabetics myself, I know first hand that is easier said than done. To put it in another perspective, I shoot for around 50 grams of carbs total for the day to keep my blood sugars in a good range. This is critical as I dont take meds. Just this evening I had a turkey, bacon and cheese sandwich. The whole grain bread which is on the thicker side equaled 40 grams of carbs. Do you see how my 50 grams went out the window so quick? Continue reading >>

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

Effect Of Consumption Of Finger Millet On Hyperglycemia In Non-insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (niddm) Subjects

, Volume 57, Issue34 , pp 205213 | Cite as Effect of consumption of finger millet on hyperglycemia in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) subjects The effect of consumption of finger millet based diets on hyperglycemiawas studied in 6 noninsulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) subjects.All the experimental diets were planned to be isocaloric and also tocontain 75 g equivalent of carbohydrate load so that glycemic responsecould be compared with a 75 g glucose load. The glycemic response tobreakfast items compared to that of glucose was determined by comparingthe areas under the 2 hr glucose response curve. Consumption of fingermillet based diets resulted in significantly lower plasma glucose levels,mean peak rise, and area under curve which might have been due to thehigher fiber content of finger millet compared to rice and wheat. Thelower glycemic response of whole finger millet based diets may also havebeen due to the presence of antinutritional factors in whole finger milletflour which are known to reduce starch digestibility and absorption. Dietary managementGlycemic responseNIDDMWhole andgerminated finger millet This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Jenkins DJ, Wesson V, Wolever JM, Osima A, Wong CC (1988) Wholemeal versus whole grain breads: proportion of whole or cracked gram and the glycaemic response. Br Med J 297: 950960. Google Scholar Toma ED, Lintas C, Clementi A, Marcelli M (1988) Soluble and insoluble dietary fiber in diabetic diets. Eur J Clin Nutr 42(4): 313319. Google Scholar Thorne JJ, Jenkins DJA, Thompson LU (1983) Factors affecting starch digestibility and the glycaemic responses with special reference to legumes. Am J Clin Nutr 4: 95103. Google Scholar Ram Continue reading >>

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