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Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar) In Newborns

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar) In Newborns

What is hypoglycaemia? Hypoglycaemia means low blood sugar. Your baby's sugar levels are regulated by his hormones, the key hormone being insulin. Insulin helps his body to store sugar (blood glucose) and release it when he needs it. When everything is working well, your baby's hormones keep his blood sugar levels balanced. When the balance is out, hypoglycaemia can happen. If your baby's blood sugar is low and it is not treated, it could be harmful to his health. Low blood sugar that isn't picked up can even lead to a baby's brain being damaged. That's why your midwife or doctor will closely monitor your baby to make sure he stays well. Rest assured that if your baby is not premature, and is otherwise healthy, he is unlikely to have low blood sugar. What causes hypoglycaemia in newborns? Your baby's blood sugar levels go down in the first few hours after birth, which is completely normal. Your baby gets his glucose from milk. When your baby has just had a feed, his sugar levels will go up. As the next feed draws closer, his sugar levels will start to dip. Keeping the right level of sugar in the blood is a delicate balancing act. Most healthy babies can cope easily with these normal ups and downs in blood sugar level. If you feed your baby whenever he wants, he will take the milk he needs to ensure his sugar levels remain balanced. However, some babies can be at risk, including babies born to mums who have diabetes. These babies may produce too much insulin when they are born, making them prone to lower blood sugar levels. Babies are also susceptible to hypoglycaemia if they: were born prematurely or very small had breathing difficulties at birth have suffered excessive coldness, or hypothermia have an infection Low blood sugar in newborns can usually be reversed quickl Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia may be described as low levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. This is commonly seen in people who are diabetic, and their blood sugar levels fall too low - either because they took their medications and did not eat properly, or the dosage of medication is too high for them. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels much lower than these can indicate hypoglycemia. Causes of Hypoglycemia: Causes of hypoglycemia may include: Excessive exercise, or lack of food intake Certain forms of alcohol may cause low blood sugar levels Certain kinds of tumors, affecting the pancreas (insulinomas) After stomach surgery People with kidney failure, who are on dialysis, may experience hypoglycemia. If you have liver disease, you may be at risk for hypoglycemia. You may have problems with your thyroid, adrenal, or pituitary glands. You may not be absorbing food that you eat very well, thus resulting in hypoglycemia. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: You may feel sweaty, shaky or hungry. You may feel faint. Extremely low blood sugar levels may cause you to be confused, or disoriented. Severely low levels of blood sugar may cause coma. You may have a fast heartbeat, or feel palpitations. Things You Can Do About Hypoglycemia: If you are experiencing low blood sugar levels as a result of your treatment of diabetes, your healthcare provider may instruct you on the use of close blood sugar monitoring during this time. Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions. Try to exercise. Low blood sugar levels are often temporary. If you are diabetic, you will have high blood sugars as well. Make a daily walk either alone, or with a friend or family member a part of your routine. Even light wal Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

A A A Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a commonly perceived problem. In actuality, while some or many of the symptoms may be present, it is rarely confirmed or documented. The presence of true, documented hypoglycemia in the absence of diabetes treatment must be evaluated comprehensively by an endocrinologist. Hypoglycemia most often affects those at the extremes of age, such as infants and the elderly, but may happen at any age. Generally, hypoglycemia is defined as a serum glucose level (the amount of sugar or glucose in your blood) below 70 mg/dL. As a medical problem, hypoglycemia is diagnosed by the presence of three key features (known as Whipple's triad). Whipple's triad is: symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia, a low plasma glucose concentration, and relief of symptoms after the plasma glucose level is raised. Symptoms of hypoglycemia typically appear at levels below 60 mg/dL. Some people may feel symptoms above this level. Levels below 50 mg/dL affect brain function. The body regulates its glucose level—the primary source of energy for the brain, muscles, and other essential cells - by the actions of different hormones. These hormones include insulin (which lowers the blood sugar level) and other chemicals which raise blood sugar (such as glucagon, growth hormone, and epinephrine). Both insulin and glucagon are manufactured in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach which assists the digestive tract. Special cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, make insulin. Alpha cells in the pancreas make glucagon. The role of insulin is to help in the absorption of glucose from the blood by causing it to be stored in the liver or be transported into other tissues of the body (for metabolism or storage). Glucagon increases the amount of Continue reading >>

7 Signs You Have Low Blood Sugar

7 Signs You Have Low Blood Sugar

“Low blood sugar” is one of those terms we’ve all heard thrown around a bunch but probably don’t know much about. It’s understandable that you’d feel a little cranky when a last-minute work meeting or general busyness forces you to push back a meal. But how do you know if you're annoyed due to low blood sugar or if your irritability is due to regular old hanger? “This is a topic that actually comes up quite a bit for me with patients and clients,” Jessica Cording, a New York-based R.D., tells SELF. Low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, happens when levels of your blood glucose—an important energy source for your body—drop below normal, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Because our bodies require glucose for fuel, maintaining a steady stream of blood glucose is critical to keep your body functioning,” Karen Ansel, R.D.N., co-author of The Calendar Diet: A Month by Month Guide to Losing Weight While Living Your Life, tells SELF. We get our glucose from food, which explains why someone may complain that they have low blood sugar when they haven’t eaten recently. But along with not having enough to eat, certain medications or overdoing it with alcohol can cause low blood sugar in otherwise healthy people, Ansel says. Those people may experience symptoms like feeling shaky, irritable, or weak, says Cording, who notes that people can also feel anxious, start sweating, or become confused. And people with medical conditions like diabetes or hepatitis are more likely to experience complications from low blood sugar, which can be dangerous for them, Ansel says. “If it gets really severe, you pass out because your body has no energy to do what it needs to do,” says Cording. But chances are that you don't have to worry about low b Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes In Pregnancy: Low Blood Sugar

How Can I Get Low Blood Sugar? You can get a low blood sugar (blood glucose) if you... Delay a meal Skip a meal or snack Eat too little Take too much insulin Exercise more than usual Drink alcohol without eating (drinking is not advised during pregnancy How will I Feel if My Blood Sugar is Low? Symptoms of low blood glucose are... Headache Dizziness Drowsiness Cold sweat Difficulty concentrating Pounding heart Difficulty talking Tingling of mouth Irritability Extreme hunger What Should I Do if My Blood Glucose Might Be Low? Sit down - Get help if available. Test your blood sugar - If your blood glucose is less than 70, eat or drink 15gms of carbohydrate (see below) or take 3 glucose tabs. Retest your blood sugar in 15 minutes - If your blood glucose has not increased at least 20 points, consume another 15 grams of carbohydrate. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until blood sugar is 70 or more (x2). Continue to monitor how you feel and retest your blood sugar as indicated. The Following Foods Have About 15 Grams of Fast-Acting Carbohydrates: 3-4 glucose tablets (with water) 1 tube glucose gel 1/2 cup fruit juice 1/3 cup regular JELL-O® (not diet) 1 tablespoon honey or sugar 1 tablespoon jam or jelly (not diet) 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 6 Life Savers® 4 Starbursts® 1 cup fat-free milk Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Some people have no symptoms of low blood sugar. The only symptom you may have is confusion. Or you may become unconscious before anyone realizes you have low blood sugar. You may have hypoglycemic unawareness if you: Cannot tell by your symptoms that your blood sugar is low. Have low blood sugar several times a week. Have type 1 diabetes, or have had Continue reading >>

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Glucose Tablets Likely Better For Easing Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

(Reuters Health) - When people with diabetes experience a dangerous drop in blood sugar, glucose tablets might be a better option than a sugary food or drink, a study suggests. People with diabetes can develop hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, if they skip a meal, exercise harder than usual or take too much insulin or other diabetes medications. Low blood sugar can cause fatigue, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, sweating, mental confusion or even coma or seizures if not treated quickly. For a new study, researchers pooled data from four papers in the medical literature that compared the effect of dietary sugars and glucose tablets on relieving low blood sugar symptoms, including three randomized trials, which are generally the most reliable kind of medical study. As reported in the Emergency Medicine Journal, the adults and children in the studies had type 1 or type 2 diabetes. All of them were awake throughout their episodes of low blood sugar. Altogether, 515 low blood sugar episodes were treated with dietary sugar and 232 were treated with glucose tablets. Across the four studies, different forms of dietary sugars were used, including Skittles candies, orange juice, Mentos candies, jelly beans, cornstarch, milk and glucose gels. In general, the individual substances were about as effective as the glucose tablets for getting blood sugar levels to rise. When results from all four studies were combined, neither dietary sugars nor glucose tablets reliably returned blood sugar levels to normal within 10 to 15 minutes, according to the research team. “Regardless of the oral (method) used to treat hypoglycemia, time is required for absorption before the measured blood returns to the normal range and the patient’s symptoms improve,” the authors wrote. However, people who used Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is when the amount of sugar in your blood drops to 70 mg/dL or lower. It’s important to speak with your health care provider about what is considered low blood sugar for you. Low blood sugar is something that you need to be prepared to treat. You might get low blood sugar if you: Take certain medicines and eat too few carbohydrates (starches) or skip or delay a meal Take too much medicine (ask your diabetes care team if this applies to you) Are more physically active than usual Low blood sugar can happen suddenly. But in most cases, you will notice the signs and symptoms. Recognize low blood sugar early and take action It is important to identify the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar early so you can do something before it gets worse. Special Alert The signs and symptoms of low blood sugar may be less clear after you have had many episodes of low blood sugar. Some signs and symptoms might be so hard to notice that you don’t react to them quickly. Hypoglycemia unawareness, also known as low blood sugar unawareness, is abnormally low blood sugar readings without the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar. Weak or tired Hungry Dizzy or shaky Nervous or upset Sweaty Confused Like your mood is changing Like your head hurts Like your heart is beating too fast Like your eyesight is blurry What to do about low blood sugar Ask your health care provider what level of blood sugar is too low for you. For most people, it is 70 mg/dL or lower. Check your blood sugar right away if you have any symptoms of low blood sugar. If your blood sugar is low, or if you think your blood sugar is low, follow the 'Rule of 15.' This means treat your low blood sugar with 15 grams of carbohydrates (carbs). Wait 15 minutes. Test your blood sugar again, and if i Continue reading >>

Adrenal Fatigue And Hypoglycemia Symptoms – Part 1

Adrenal Fatigue And Hypoglycemia Symptoms – Part 1

Reset Hypoglycemia Symptoms One of the classic signs of Adrenal Fatigue are hypoglycemia symptoms. Traditionally hypoglycemia is a medical term for a state produced by a lower than normal level of blood sugar. Unfortunately, no single glucose value alone satisfactorily gauges all people because many variables are involved. While there are no disagreements as to the normal range of blood sugar (90-110 mg/dl), debate continues as to what degree of hypoglycemia warrants medical evaluation and treatment, or can cause harm. Throughout the 24-hour cycle of a day, blood plasma glucose levels of healthy people are generally maintained between 72 and 144 mg/dL (4-8 mmol/L) while 60 or 70 mg/dL (3.3 or 3.9 mmol/L) is commonly cited as the lower limit of normal glucose. Many healthy people can occasionally have glucose levels in the hypoglycemic range without hypoglycemia symptoms of disease. This makes hypoglycemia a difficult clinical state to establish in the first place. The problem is further compounded in those with Adrenal Fatigue. In Adrenal Fatigue, the hypoglycemia symptoms experienced is more often than not sub-clinical. This means that the person has clinical hypoglycemia symptoms even though the blood plasma level is invariably above 60-70 mg/dl. Their fasting serum blood sugar and glucose tolerance tests are usually normal. Conventional doctors not aware of the adrenal influence will miss this. The diagram below shows how Adrenal Fatigue contributes to hypoglycemia symptoms. Compared to a normal person or even one with compromised insulin control, those with Adrenal Fatigue tend to have hypoglycemia symptoms even though the serum blood sugar may be within the normal range. This is clinically evident. After a meal, those with advanced Adrenal Fatigue tend to have a fa Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

Effects And Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Levels

Effects And Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Levels

One of the side effects of diabetes suffered by many individuals is low blood sugar. In the case of diabetes the body is not able to process blood sugar or glucose which subsequently damages bodily systems and organs. The treatment for low glucose levels is to use oral hypoglycemic or injectable insulin which assists the body in producing energy by drawing glucose into the cellular system. The insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications require that the individual have a enough blood sugar upon which it will work. In some cases an individual will also have a condition that is known as “brittle” or hard to control diabetes. These individuals find that they have problems with low blood sugar and high blood sugar which happened during both the daytime and night time. Low Blood Sugar Definition Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is the medical term used to describe when blood sugar falls below what the body requires to stay alive. The normal blood sugar range level is between 70 and 99 mg/dL Low blood sugar is defined when the level, measured in mg/dL, falls below 65. When it falls very low, such as below 20, it is considered a dangerous blood sugar level; individuals can get confused, drowsy and even lose consciousness. The blood sugar levels are necessary in order to maintain significant brain activity. If this blood sugar drops during pregnancy it can permanently harmed the baby. Individuals who do not suffer from brittle diabetes can produce low blood sugar by taking too much insulin, not eating enough food, exercise when it wasn’t planned for, drinking too much alcohol or exercising and not eating. Each of these situations causes an environment in the body in which the amount of blood sugar drops and there continues to be insulin present that works on the remaining b Continue reading >>

13 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar & How To Fix It

13 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar & How To Fix It

Extreme changes in blood sugar levels are more common than you might think, and can lead on to serious problems if left unchecked. A 2015 review found that, among those with type 2 diabetes, mild episodes of low blood sugar occur an average of 19 times a year, with almost one severe episode on average annually. This was particularly common among those taking insulin. Thankfully, there are several warning signs that all is not well. Learn to identify when you hit a blood sugar dip and take action to stabilize glucose levels for the good of your health. Blood Sugar Highs & Lows Our blood sugar levels can affect so many aspects of our wellbeing – both mental and physical. But what exactly is blood sugar? Well, after eating, our food is broken down into various parts – one of which is glucose (sugar), which is either used right away for energy or stored for later use. For our bodily cells to be able to use glucose, we must be producing enough insulin, and our body must be able to use this insulin correctly. (Diabetics either cannot produce insulin or cannot use it properly.) If our bodies cannot do this, we experience fluctuations in blood sugar. We can also experience these fluctuations if we skip meals, drink alcohol on an empty stomach, eat a lot of junk food or simple carbohydrates, engage in more physical activity than we are used to, or as a side effect of various medications. If blood sugar levels dip below 70 mg/dL, they are considered too low – a condition known as hypoglycemia – and can cause a variety of symptoms, including the following 13: 13 Warning Signs of Low Blood Sugar 1. Shakiness, Lightheadedness or Dizziness Feeling shaky, lightheaded or dizzy are very common symptoms of low blood sugar as brain cells tend to malfunction when blood glucose drop Continue reading >>

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