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Low Blood Sugar Vomiting

Nausea And Vomiting

Nausea And Vomiting

Tweet Most, if not all of us will be familiar with the feeling of nausea, which is basically the feeling of needing to be sick, felt in the stomach area. Both nausea and vomiting can be a sign of a number of underlying health conditions, including diabetes. When there is an issue that can affect the stomach or gastric system of their body, people can feel sick. Even if it is a fairly tenuous connection, such as angina affecting blood flow, the sufferer may still feel queasy. Causes of nausea Both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes can cause nausea or vomiting in several ways. Hyperglycemia and Hypoglycemia As the blood glucose levels rise and fall, the body's metabolism can get interrupted and confused which can lead to a mixed feeling of nausea. Low blood pressure (Hypotension) Low blood pressure often leads to dizzy spells which, for some people, can induce a feeling of nausea as the world appears to spin around them. Certain medications The side effect of a lot of drugs is a feeling of nausea, and even vomiting. Metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug, is known to have nauseating side effects. Gastroparesis Due to neuropathy, the body may not be able to move food from the stomach or along the intestines. This can cause a back log of food, which can result in sickness. Bezoars Bezoars are stone like formations created from undigested food matter, which can block the gastro-intestinal track and stop food processing and digesting. This can eventually cause nausea and vomiting. When to see your doctor If you are having recurrent or consistent bouts of nausea or vomiting, then it is a good idea to go and see your doctor to get the issue sorted as soon as possible. Keeping a diary of nausea or vomiting episodes and what you ate or were doing beforehand may help the Continue reading >>

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

Vomiting In Diabetic Cats

It’s not difficult to recognize the more common diabetes symptoms in cats. They drink a lot of water, urinate more frequently and lose weight. Treatment of diabetes involves regular injections of insulin to keep blood glucose levels within normal limits. Vomiting isn’t one of the most common feline symptoms of this disease. Having said that, if a cat is being treated for feline diabetes, vomiting is definitely something to watch out for. It can indicate that their blood glucose is not being well controlled, and they may be developing diabetic ketoacidosis. This is a potentially fatal condition that needs urgent veterinary treatment. However, if a diabetic cat starts throwing up, it doesn’t necessarily mean that their diabetes is worsening. Other symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis to look for are increased thirst, loss of appetite and extreme lethargy. Another reason for diabetic vomiting in cats is pancreatitis. This condition can be hard to diagnose in our feline family members but should always be considered when cat vomiting in a diabetic pet becomes a problem. Some veterinarians believe that up to one half of all cases of diabetes in cats are accompanied by a low grade chronic inflammation of the pancreas. When they have a flare up, it can reduce their appetite and make them vomit. They need to be closely monitored until they recover because the change in their food intake will affect the amount of insulin they need. Don’t forget that there are many other cat vomiting causes that are totally unrelated to diabetes. Some examples include gastroenteritis, kidney disease and inflammatory bowel disease. Because a diabetic cat has an underlying chronic medical condition, any illness will need a thorough investigation including comprehensive blood tests and possibly Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Cats

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Cats

What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a life-threatening condition in which the blood sugar levels drop dangerously low. The pancreatic beta cells produce the hormone insulin which helps to move glucose from food into the cells (for energy). It is not a disease in itself, but it is a symptom of an underlying disorder. The liver and muscles store excess glucose in the form of glycogen, when needed, enzymes release it back into the blood. Many cells of the body can use protein or fat as energy sources if blood sugar levels drop, however, the brain relies on glucose alone. If glucose levels drop, the brain can no longer function properly and neurologic dysfunction occurs. Severe cases can lead to brain damage or death. Causes: Excess insulin: The most common cause of hypoglycemia in cats is due to an insulin overdose. This is especially common in the early days when insulin levels are still being adjusted. It is also possible for your an insulin overdose to occur as your cat’s insulin requirements may change over time, particularly if his diabetes comes under control due to dietary changes (known as diabetic remission). Pancreatic tumors (insulinomas) which secrete excess amounts of insulin regardless of glucose levels. Other types of cancer such as hepatic, mammary, pulmonary, lymphoma, oral melanoma. Certain medications and toxins such as xylitol and sulfonylureas. Decreased glucose production: Missed meals, especially in the diabetic cat. Vomiting – Once a cat eats a meal, insulin is secreted to help move glucose into the cells, if the cat vomits up his meal shortly afterward, the increased levels of insulin with no food to digest can result in hypoglycemia. Certain medications such as beta blockers. Hepatic disease, portosystemic shunt, hepatic lipidosis, hepatic n Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

What Makes Blood Sugar Levels Get Low?

What Makes Blood Sugar Levels Get Low?

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is uncommon in persons without diabetes. In otherwise healthy adults, fasting (lack of food) is the most common cause of low blood sugars. Medications such as insulin and drugs like alcohol are other primary culprits. Adults who are critically ill can also develop low blood sugars. In rare instances, hormonal disorders or tumors can be the problem. If for any reason you believe you are having symptoms related to low blood sugar that do not improve after eating, see a doctor for help. Hypoglycemia occurs for a variety of different reasons. Certain medications may cause hypoglycemia like insulin taken to lower the blood sugar in people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, your eating, exercising, and medication must be carefully balanced to keep your blood sugar within the normal range. Too much exercise or not enough food, relative to your medication, can cause low blood sugar. In people who do not have diabetes, certain medications, drinking alcoholic beverages, eating disorders, and tumors can cause hypoglycemia. Problems with your liver, kidneys, or the endocrine system may cause hypoglycemia. Sometimes hypoglycemia may occur when the body makes too much insulin in response to eating. A tendency toward hypoglycemia can be hereditary, but dietary carbohydrates usually play a central role in its cause, prevention, and treatment. Simple carbohydrates, or sugars, are quickly absorbed by the body, resulting in a rapid elevation in blood sugar level; this stimulates a corresponding excessive elevation in serum insulin levels, which can then lead to hypoglycemia. Insulin is the hormone responsible for lowering blood sugar by taking sugar out of the blood and putting it into cells. High levels of insulin mean low levels of blood glucose. Normal Continue reading >>

2017 The Nemours Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

2017 The Nemours Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

No matter what we're doing, even during sleep, our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from food, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to them through the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia. Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need immediate medical treatment. Blood sugar levels in someone with diabetes are considered low when they fall below the target range. A blood sugar level slightly lower than the target range might not cause symptoms, but repeated low levels could require a change in the treatment plan to help avoid problems. The diabetes health care team will find a child's target blood sugar levels based on things like the child's age, ability to recognize hypoglycemia symptoms, and the goals of the diabetes treatment plan. Low blood sugar levels are fairly common in people with diabetes. A major goal of diabetes care is to keep blood sugar levels from getting or staying too high to prevent both short- and long-term health problems. To do this, people with diabetes may use insulin and/or pills, depending on the type of diabetes they have. These medicines usually help keep blood sugar levels in a healthy range, but in certain situations, might make them drop too low. Hypoglycemia can happen at any time in people taking blood sugar-lowering medicines, but is more likely if someone: skips or delays meals or snacks or doesn't eat as much carbohydrate-containing food as expected when taking the diabetes medicine. This is common in kids who develop an illness (such as a stomach virus) that causes loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting. takes too much insulin, ta Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check your blood sugar levels. Some tests might include not eating (fasting) and watching for symptoms. Other tests might involve eating a meal that could cause symptoms of low blood sugar seve Continue reading >>

Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Diabetes

Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Diabetes

The first time I experienced a low blood sugar episode was scary. Sweating and a pounding heart woke me out of a sound sleep in the middle of the night. Stumbling to my desk, I tried to check my blood sugar. I had been warned about this potential side effect of the new diabetes medicine my doctor prescribed. Sure enough, the number was way below 80. In the kitchen I pulled milk out of the fridge, and it dropped out of my hand. That woke up my daughter, who is a nurse. She came in and took over, getting me a bowl of cereal and watching until my blood sugar normalized. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is not something I ever get used to. Because it happens so suddenly, it is always a surprise. People with Type 1 diabetes tend to have these episodes more often than those of us with Type 2, but we can experience them as well, particularly if we’re taking certain types of medicine. Therefore, we need to know how to deal with them. What causes hypoglycemia? Our cells use glucose for energy. If the supply starts to run low, our bodies are supposed to react quickly by releasing more from our liver or warning us to eat something. But having Type 2 diabetes means our system does not respond in typical ways. In addition, we may be taking oral diabetes medicines or insulin injections that lower our glucose levels. Trying to regulate blood sugar artificially can cause lows, especially if we are under stress, get sick and can’t eat, or do some exercise without checking our blood glucose periodically. (Exercise uses up glucose and makes the body more sensitive to insulin.) Symptoms of hypoglycemia You may feel weak and shaky. You might begin to sweat, or your heart might start pounding. Blurred vision is another symptom. (Editor’s note: Click here for an explanation of common h Continue reading >>

Practical Peds: Handling The Hypoglycemic Child

Practical Peds: Handling The Hypoglycemic Child

There are a few kids out there who are prone to hypoglycemia. They may be diabetic and on insulin, or have ketotic hypoglycemia or metabolic disorders that cause them to drop their blood sugars with stress. One thing that mothers can do is stock up on cake frosting. Your next patient is a small five-year-old boy who is rather thin and pale. He is lying on the gurney and not responding to anything. On rapid assessment, his airway, breathing and circulation seem to be OK. He isn’t actively having a seizure. His mom says she brought him in because his blood sugar is low. You get a bedside glucose and she’s right, it’s 38. You start a line and grab a couple of tubes of blood before you start any dextrose. You bolus him with 5 ml/kg of 10% dextrose rapidly through the peripheral line. Now it’s time to talk to the mom and get more of the story. She says he’s had this problem since he was two. He’ll have episodes of vomiting and become unresponsive and when he’s taken in to the ED his blood sugar will be low. He’s been admitted for this in the past but his work-up has been inconclusive. Mom says that she was to tell the ED the next time he came in to get some labs before they give him glucose. OK, now you’re feeling pretty good about those tubes you snagged. This morning was a pretty typical episode for him. He woke up and began vomiting. No fevers. Mom gave him Zofran but he vomited that too. She kept checking his blood sugars and they ranged from 49-59. She made one more attempt to get him to take something by mouth but he threw that up too, so she loaded him in the car and brought him in to the ED. He’s vomited about 8 times. No diarrhea, no fevers, no ill contacts. His past history is otherwise unremarkable. He’s on no meds except Zofran as needed. No Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia in Dogs The medical term for critically low levels of sugar in the blood is hypoglycemia, and it is often linked to diabetes and an overdose of insulin. The blood sugar, or glucose, is a main energy of source in an animal's body, so a low amount will result in a severe decrease in energy levels, possibly to the point of loss of consciousness. There are conditions other than diabetes that can also cause blood sugar levels to drop to dangerous levels in dogs. In most animals, hypoglycemia is actually not a disease in and of itself, but is only an indication of another underlying health problem. The brain actually needs a steady supply of glucose in order to function properly, as it does not store and create glucose itself. When glucose levels drop to a dangerously low level, a condition of hypoglycemia takes place. This is a dangerous health condition and needs to be treated quickly and appropriately. If you suspect hypoglycemia, especially if your dog is disposed to this condition, you will need to treat the condition quickly before it becomes life threatening. Symptoms Loss of appetite (anorexia) Increased hunger Visual instability, such as blurred vision Disorientation and confusion – may show an apparent inability to complete basic routine tasks Weakness, low energy, loss of consciousness Anxiety, restlessness Tremor/shivering Heart palpitations These symptoms may not be specific to hypoglycemia, there can be other possible underlying medical causes. The best way to determine hypoglycemia if by having the blood sugar level measured while the symptoms are apparent. Causes There may be several causes for hypoglycemia, but the most common is the side effects caused by drugs that are being used to treat diabetes. Dogs with diabetes are given insulin to help Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Missed Meals Or Night Hunger Can Make Your Child Throw Up

Missed Meals Or Night Hunger Can Make Your Child Throw Up

IN MOST cases, we have seen young kids who go to bed or sleep without super and in the night complains of nausea or vomit. When we eat, food, especially carbohydrates, are converted into glucose in the body that provides energy. Glucose in blood is glycemia and in case there is low glucose, then the situation becomes hypoglycemia. The situation whereby kids develop low blood glucose or hypoglycemia and vomit is known as ketotic hypoglycemia. Some parents might not realise that not getting enough food can be the cause of unexplained vomiting for their young ones and this usually happens in the middle of the night or morning. Children who are seemingly health and vomit during the above mentioned times then vomiting is often caused by low blood sugar. However, this problem is often seen amongst children aged nine months and five years. The child will typically feel some nausea or abdominal discomfort just prior to vomiting, and will usually be subdued for about 30 minutes after vomiting, afterwards will otherwise appear normal. Vomiting caused by ketotic hypoglycemia is often misdiagnosed as the stomach flu. The distinguishing feature of ketotic hypoglycemia is that the child quickly returns to normal; if vomiting occurs in the middle of the night, after a short period of general weakness, the child will typically sleep comfortably for the rest of the night. But if vomiting occurs in the morning, the child has to eat before he or she goes for daily activities. Vomits caused by ketotic hypoglycemia differ from those caused by other problems such as the stomach flu. In ketotic hypoglycemia, the Vomitus appears typically bubbly and tinged with a bit of yellow color whereas in stomach flu the vomits are incompletely digested food. Why so common in the middle of the night? Duri Continue reading >>

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