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Low Blood Sugar Type 2 Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means low blood sugar. Symptoms include: As the term implies, low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, occurs when your brain and body are not getting enough sugar. For most people whose blood sugar is kept in the near normal range, less than 70 mg/dl can be considered low, or hypoglycemic. When you have type 2 diabetes and are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin, you are at risk for low blood sugars or hypoglycemia. It is very unlikely for individuals with type 2 diabetes who are only treated with lifestyle changes or blood sugar normalizing medications to have a low blood sugar. Acute Complication: Hypoglycemia Recognizing low blood sugar is important. Why? So that you can take steps to prevent a medical emergency. First symptoms of low blood sugar: Shaking, sweating, rapid heartbeat Change in vision Hunger Headache Sudden moodiness Severe symptoms of low blood sugar requiring immediate medical attention: Behavior changes Lack of coordination Inattention and confusion Seizures Loss of consciousness What causes low blood sugars? Monitoring your blood sugar often Staying alert for the first symptoms Keeping some sugar or sweet handy (and eating it as necessary) Despite all the safety planning, you still may get a low blood sugar when you are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin. So always wear your medical alert identification. And if you are taking insulin, have family members or friends trained to use a Glucagon Emergency kit. What causes hypoglycemic unawareness? Sometimes people treated with insulin releasing pills or insulin lose the ability to detect a low blood sugar – a condition known as hypoglycemic unawareness. Your brain has a trigger po Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL (3.0 mmol/L) is cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin Glyburide (Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl), repaglinide (Prandin), or nateglinide (Starlix) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) Know how to tell when your blood sugar is getting low. Symptoms include: Weakness or feeling tired Shaking Sweating Headache Hunger Feeling uneasy, nervous, or anxious Feeling cranky Trouble thinking clearly Double or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Sometimes your blood sugar may be too low even if you do not have symptoms. If it gets too low, you may: Faint Have a seizure Go into a coma Talk with your health care provider about when you should check your blood sugar every day. People who have low blood sugar need to check their blood sugar more often. The most common causes of low blood sugar are: Taking your insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Not eating enough during meals or snacks after you have taken insulin or diabetes medicine Skipping meals Waiting too long after taking your medicine to eat your meals Exercising a lot or at a time that is unusual for you Not checking your blood sugar or not adjusting your insulin dose before exercising Drinking alcohol Preventing low blood sugar is better than having to treat it. Always have a source of fast-acting sugar with you. When you exercise, check your blood sugar levels. Make sure you have snacks with you. Talk to your provider about r Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

I’ve spoken to far too many people with type 2 diabetes who start to explain to me these moments of severe dizziness and shaking, and the desperate urge to eat food that they experience sometimes every day, sometimes just once a week. The problem is that no one ever explained to them what a low blood sugar feels like, how to treat a low blood sugar properly, and why it’s happening. It seems as though many busy physicians short on time assume that a person with type 2 diabetes whose A1C is higher than ideal couldn’t possibly be experiencing low blood sugars. Unfortunately, that assumption simply isn’t true. Simple guide to low blood sugars in type 2 diabetes: What is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): the American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia as an event that occurs when your blood sugar drops below 70 mg/dL. If you don’t currently own a glucose meter to actually check your blood sugar level, you can a) ask your doctor for a prescription and b) stay alert to the signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar described below. You may experience some or all of the following symptoms during a low blood sugar: lightheaded, dizzy, trembling, shaking, weakness, headache, sweating, numbness in your lips, tingling in your numbs, a jello-like feeling in your limbs. To see a full list, visit Diabetes.org. Severe hypoglycemia under 30 mg/dL can lead to seizures or comas. It’s important to catch the signs and symptoms sooner than later. The cause of these low blood sugars can be: Oral medications: Most oral diabetes medications (except for Metformin) are known to cause low blood sugars. This means the dosage is possibly too high, and you should explain your low blood sugars to your doctor so she/he can adjust your dosage. Fast-Acting Insulin: Too often, when type 2 di Continue reading >>

6 Fixes For Low Blood Sugar

6 Fixes For Low Blood Sugar

If you think your blood glucose is too low, use your glucose meter to check your level. If it's lower than 70 mg/dL, try one of these "quick fix" foods right away to raise your blood glucose: 2 or 3 glucose tablets 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of any fruit juice 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of a regular (not diet) soft drink 1 cup (8 ounces) of milk 5 or 6 pieces of hard candy 1 or 2 teaspoons of sugar or honey After 15 minutes, check your blood glucose again to make sure that it's no longer too low. If it is, have another serving. Repeat these steps until your blood glucose is at least 70. If your next meal is more than an hour away, have a snack as well. Last updated: August 2006 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Type 2: Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar Include Feeling Dizzy | Health | Life & Style | Express.co.uk

Diabetes type 2 is caused by the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or the body not reacting to the hormone, according to the NHS . Without enough insulin, the body cant convert sugar in the blood into useable energy. If you take insulin to treat your diabetes, you could be at risk of low blood sugar - or hypocalcaemia - if you take too much of diabetes medicine. Symptoms of low blood sugar can include feeling dizzy, and is usually treated by eating a sugar snack. Diabetes type 2: This spice could prevent high blood sugar Diabetes type 2: Symptoms of low blood sugar include feeling dizzy Hypoglycaemia is a condition characterised by abnormally low bloodglucose[bloodsugar] levels, usually less than 70mg/dl, said the American Diabetes Association. However, it is important to talk to your health care provider about your individualblood glucosetargets, and what level is too low for you. Hypoglycaemic symptoms are important clues that you have low blood glucose. Each person's reaction tohypoglycaemiais different, so it's important that you learn your own signs and symptoms when your blood glucose is low. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Glucose Affects Type 2, Too

Low Blood Glucose Affects Type 2, Too

The dangers of low blood glucose are familiar to most people who have Type 1 diabetes, but a new survey designed by the American College of Endocrinology shows that a majority of people with Type 2 diabetes have experienced low blood glucose as well. Roughly 24 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Low blood glucose, also known as hypoglycemia, is generally considered to be a blood glucose level below 70 mg/dl. Symptoms can include weakness, drowsiness, confusion, hunger, dizziness, paleness, headache, irritability, trembling, sweating, rapid heartbeat, and a cold, clammy feeling; in severe cases, hypoglycemia can lead to a loss of consciousness or coma. Common causes of hypoglycemia include skipped meals, intense exercise, and certain diabetes medicines, such as insulin, meglitinides (brand names Starlix and Prandin), and sulfonylureas (Diabinese, Diabeta, Glynase, Micronase, Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL, and Amaryl). The online survey, which sought to determine people’s knowledge of and experiences with hypoglycemia, was conducted in November and December 2010 and looked at 2,530 adults who had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. It found that 55% of those surveyed had experienced low blood glucose, with many of the episodes occurring during daily activities such as working, driving, and exercising. The survey also found that a portion of people with Type 2 diabetes was not familiar with the common causes of hypoglycemia. Etie Moghissi, MD, FACP, FACE, vice president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and associate clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, notes that “The survey shows that it’s important to inform patients about the causes, symptoms, and how to address h Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Common In Those With Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Low Blood Sugar Common In Those With Type 2 Diabetes, Study Finds

Many people with Type 2 diabetes experience potentially dangerous episodes of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, according to a first-of-its-kind review by researchers at the University of Leicester and Leicester’s Hospitals. Approximately 28 million people in the United States and roughly 3 million people in the United Kingdom have Type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia, which is defined in most people as a blood sugar level below 70 mg/dl, is commonly caused by taking certain diabetes medicines, skipping meals, consuming alcohol, or exercising. Typical symptoms include confusion, shakiness, hunger, headaches, irritability, and pale skin. To determine the prevalence of episodes of low blood sugar in those with Type 2 diabetes, researchers reviewed a series of studies including a total of 532,542 people with Type 2. They found that 45% of the participants had experienced mild hypoglycemia and 6% had experienced severe hypoglycemia. On average, each person had 19 episodes of mild hypoglycemia and just less than one severe episode per year. Instances of low blood sugar were especially common among people taking insulin, but they were still fairly prevalent among those on other Type 2 diabetes treatment regimens. “Our results highlight an urgent need for raising awareness amongst patients and health-care professionals about hypoglycemia,” noted postgraduate researcher Chloe Louise Edridge. “This study particularly highlights the need for patient education to raise awareness of hypoglycemia and the consideration of a patient’s hypoglycemia risk by health-care professionals when prescribing diabetes treatments.” For more information about the research, read the article “‘Real world’ link between type 2 diabetes, low blood sugar risk” or see the study in the journal Continue reading >>

Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Thanks to the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), it is now well recognized that intensive glycemic control can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Despite this knowledge, one of the biggest barriers in reaching glycemic targets is the increased risk of hypoglycemia that comes with tighter blood glucose control. Hypoglycemia is often reported to be one of the most feared complications of diabetes. With nocturnal hypoglycemia being especially worrisome for those who live alone or travel alone. It can also be concerning (not to mention disruptive) for a significant other that you share a bed with. What is nocturnal hypoglycemia? Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a low blood sugar that occurs overnight while you are asleep. It is common to sleep through a low blood sugar when it occurs during sleep. How common is nocturnal hypoglycemia? According to a journal article from Medscape General Medicine: During the DCCT 43 percent of all hypoglycemia episodes and 55 percent of severe [hypoglycemic] episodes reported occurred during sleep. Incidence rates vary from 12 to 56 percent, however because 49 to 100 percent of episodes occur without symptoms the actual incidence may be much higher.1 Why is nocturnal hypoglycemia concerning? Nocturnal hypoglycemia can be especially dangerous because an individual is unlikely to recognize symptoms or wake up during an episode. Undetected nocturnal hypoglycemia is a risk factor for hypoglycemia unawareness: Hypoglycemia unawareness is a low blood glucose that occurs without symptoms therefore the person is unaware of the drop in their blood glucose, ultimately delaying treatment. Nocturnal hypoglycemia may also result in physical injury, poor quality of life and possibly impairment in cognitive function. Severe hypoglycemia can Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

If you have diabetes, your concern isn’t always that your blood sugar is too high. Your blood sugar can also dip too low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. This occurs when your blood sugar levels fall below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). The only clinical way to detect hypoglycemia is to test your blood sugar. However, without blood tests it’s still possible to identify low blood sugar by its symptoms. Early recognition of these symptoms is critical because hypoglycemia can cause seizures or induce a coma if left untreated. If you have a history of low blood sugar episodes, you may not feel symptoms. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness. By learning to control your blood sugar, you can prevent hypoglycemic episodes. You also should take steps to ensure you and others know how to treat low blood sugar. Managing your blood sugar is a constant balancing of: diet exercise medications A number of diabetes medications are associated with causing hypoglycemia. Only those medications that increase insulin production increase the risk for hypoglycemia. Medications that can cause hypoglycemia include: Combination pills that contain one of the medications above may also cause hypoglycemic episodes. This is a reason why it’s so important to test your blood sugar, especially when making changes to your treatment plan. Some of the most common causes of low blood sugar are: skipping a meal or eating less than usual exercising more than usual taking more medication than usual drinking alcohol, especially without food People with diabetes aren’t the only ones who experience low blood sugar. If you have any of the following conditions, you may also experience hypoglycemia: weight-loss surgery severe infection thyroid or cortisol hormone deficiency Hypoglycemia affect Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Medicines

Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Medicines

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. Some medicines for diabetes can cause low blood sugar. Even mild low blood sugar can affect the way you think and respond to things around you. And mild low blood sugar can quickly drop to a more dangerous level. Low blood sugar as a side effect of oral diabetes medicines usually causes mild symptoms, such as sweating, shakiness, and hunger. Taking too much of your diabetes medicine in one day, not eating enough food, or doing strenuous physical activity can cause your blood sugar level to drop below your target range. If your blood sugar is low and you don't eat anything, it may drop to a very low level. Keep some hard candy, raisins, or other quick sugar foods with you at all times. Eat some at the first sign of low blood sugar. Test your blood sugar often so you do not have to guess when it is low. Teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. Here are some ways you can manage low blood sugar. Be prepared Keep some quick-sugar foods with you at all times. If you are at home, you most likely will already have something close at hand that contains sugar, such as table sugar or fruit juice. Carry some hard candy or glucose tablets when you are away from home. Know the symptoms of low blood sugar, such as sweating, blurred vision, and confusion. Post them where you will see the list often. And carry a copy in your wallet or purse. Be sure that your partner and others concerned know your early symptoms, including the signs of low blood sugar at night. Wear medical identification, such as a medical alert bracelet , to let people know that you have diabetes. People will know that you have diabetes and will get Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia can occur when blood sugar levels are too high. People develop hyperglycemia if their diabetes is not treated properly. Hypoglycemia sets in when blood sugar levels are too low. It is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health consequences. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cannot be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cannot be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal and also happen on a daily basis in people who do not have diabetes. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. “Millimole per liter” (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the concentration of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, people’s blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels are rather uncommon for type 2 diabetes. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range of blood sugar and high and low blood sugar. Signs of hyperglycemia People with type 2 diabetes do not always realize that their Continue reading >>

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

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