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Low Blood Sugar Symptoms With Diabetes

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix. Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar. Anytime you suspect a low blood sugar, check it to be sure and, if you are low, raise your sugar quickly with glucose tablets or other fast carbohydrates. If you're too confused to check, eat quick carbs and check later. The faster you recognize hypoglycemia, the faster you can respond and bring the blood sugar back to normal. Keep in mind that you do not want to eat too much when you treat a low blood sugar, or you can begin a blood sugar rollercoaster. Identify the symptoms for insulin reactions so you can take action quickly. Insulin Reaction Symptoms shaking sweating irritability headache tingling hunger blurred vision dizziness and confusion numbness of the lips nausea or vomiting fast heart rate sudden tiredness seizures pale appearance frequent sighing personality change confusion or poor concentation loss Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes in an autoimmune disease where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce insulin—a hormone needed to convert food into energy. It affects children and adults, comes on suddenly, and it cannot be prevented or cured. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and dangerous occurance with type 1 diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low it may lead to insulin shock, which is life-threatening if not cared for. Low blood sugar can happen when your body has too little food—or glucose—or when it produces too much insulin. Type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia symptoms So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of low blood sugar will vary depending on the person. However, people with type 1 diabetes—whether it’s been diagnosed or not—may experience one or more of the following: -Sweating and shaking -Blurry vision -Poor coordination -Dizziness or feeling lightheaded -Difficulty concentrating -Feeling anxious or irritable -Hunger or nausea -Erratic changes in behavior What to do if you experience low blood glucose symptoms Severely low blood-sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemic seizures, unconsciousness, coma, and death if left untreated. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor if you think you have low blood sugar so he or she can check your blood-glucose levels—look into whether type 1 diabetes may be a cause—and provide the necessary treatment. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

It is important for people with diabetes to know the symptoms of high and low sugar levels so appropriate action can be taken to prevent health problems occurring in either the short or long term. In the case of low blood glucose levels, it is generally only people on certain medications such as insulin and tablets which directly stimulate insulin production that need to be actively aware of low blood sugar symptoms. Symptoms of high sugar levels (hyperglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms are common when blood glucose levels are too high: Increased urination Increased thirst Increased hunger Fatigue Dry mouth Dry eyes Blurred vision If sugar levels are regularly too high for a number of days or weeks, the following symptoms may also be recognised: Loss of weight, particularly muscle mass Regular urinary tract infections (UTIs) Regular episodes of thrush (yeast infections) Note that in people that are overweight, loss of weight may sometimes be more recognisable as a loss of muscle mass. High blood sugar can be uncomfortable and can increase the risk of developing long term complications if extended periods of hyperglycemia become a regular occurrence. Read more about hyperglycemia. Symptoms of low sugar levels (hypoglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms may be recognised if blood glucose levels become too low: Increased hunger Pale appearance Feeling weak Lethargy Faster heart rate Sweating Blurred vision Dizzy spells Reduced co-ordination Impaired ability to make decisions Hypoglycemia, or hypos for short, can be dangerous for people on the following anti-diabetic medications: Insulin Sulphonylureas Prandial glucose regulators (glinides) People with diabetes on these medications need to be able to spot the signs of low blood sugar levels quickly and Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Symptoms Of Diabetes

10 Surprising Symptoms Of Diabetes

Detecting diabetes can be difficult—one-third of people with type-2 diabetes don't have any symptoms. That's why it's important to have routine screenings. But what can indicate diabetes might surprise you. Dizziness Though often attributed to high or low blood sugar, feelings of dizziness and instability in diabetics are also caused by problems in the inner ear, the bodies balance control center, A 2009 Archives of Internal Medicine study found that people with diabetes are 70 percent more likely to have inner ear-related balance issues than the general population. The risk of falling was 12 times higher in study participants who reported dizziness. Irritability In an American Diabetes Association poll, more than 4,000 diabetes patients were asked to report all symptoms they experienced within the past year. Just over 20 percent of respondents reported feeling irritable. Unpleasant mood is caused by low blood sugar, which leaves the body and brain energy-starved. Though high blood sugar leads to a diabetes diagnosis, blood sugar can plummet if diabetics skip meals, drink alcohol, or eat at irregular times. Fatigue A study published in the British Medical Journal found that 67 percent of people with diabetes reported feeling lethargic prior to their diagnosis. This is due tothe high blood sugar that occurs when glucose levels are unregulated by insulin. Researchers from Scotland found that patients report feeling 16 percent less energized when their blood sugar is high compared to when their blood sugar is normal. Excessive Thirst Constant thirst, a condition known as polydipsia, is one of the most telltale signs of diabetes. Research has shown that roughly 65 percent of people have polydipsia before they're diagnosed with diabetes. Blurred Vision or Poor Eyesight Und Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Topic Overview Diabetes-related blood sugar levels When you have diabetes, you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range. If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell others wh Continue reading >>

Diabetics Need Immediate First Aid For Low Blood Sugars

Diabetics Need Immediate First Aid For Low Blood Sugars

Diabetics, diagnosed as someone with extraordinarily high blood sugars, sometimes experience quite the opposite. And when they do, it is important to treat low blood sugar conditions promptly. Hypoglycemia can happen when diabetics take too much insulin, don’t consume enough calories or expend more energy than planned. A blood glucose level of less than 70 mg/dl is generally considered low, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. Severely low blood sugar levels can lead to a coma or could be fatal. If detected quickly, low blood sugars can be treated at home without having to make a trip to the doctor or emergency room. That is why it is important for family members, friends or caretakers to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know how to respond.Many diabetics “get a certain feeling” when their blood sugars are dropping. They are able to consume some extra carbohydrates and protein to raise their levels. However, blood sugars sometimes drop suddenly – and diabetics are in distress without realizing it. Common signs of hypoglycemia are shakiness, dizziness, difficulty speaking, confusion, fatigue, sweating and anxiety. The behavior can be similar to someone who has consumed too much alcohol. If you notice a diabetic experiencing these symptoms, check their level with a blood sugar monitor. If the diabetic is unresponsive or you are unable to administer any treatment, you should immediately call 911 and get the patient to a hospital as soon as possible. If the reading is 70 or lower and the person is conscious, doctors recommend following the 15-15 Rule of first aid: Eat or drink 15 grams of a carbohydrate (which metabolizes into sugar). Four to six ounces of fruit juice or regular soda (Coke, Mountain Dew) will infuse the system with instant sugar. Don’t Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Some people have no symptoms of low blood sugar. The only symptom you may have is confusion. Or you may become unconscious before anyone realizes you have low blood sugar. You may have hypoglycemic unawareness if you: Cannot tell by your symptoms that your blood sugar is low. Have low blood sugar several times a week. Have type 1 diabetes, or have had Continue reading >>

Are My Daily Low Blood-sugar Spells Dangerous?

Are My Daily Low Blood-sugar Spells Dangerous?

I tend to get low blood sugar at times throughout the day. I work out on a regular basis and have difficulty knowing when to eat, what to eat, how much to eat before a workout. So, information on that would be helpful. Also I am curious what kind of internal damage, if any, am I doing each time I experience low blood sugar? Dear Beth: Thanks for your question. Many people worry about low blood sugar, but in reality this is rarely a problem for other than diabetics under tight blood sugar control. Those few nondiabetics can usually avoid it with small frequent snacks containing carbohydrates. In order to be considered hypoglycemic the person has to have: 1) Symptoms of hypoglycemia, 2) A documented low blood sugar (less than 60 mg/dl) using a laboratory measurement -- not a personal glucometer -- and 3) relief of the symptoms after consumption of sugar. The symptoms of low blood sugar are sweating, trembling, a sensation of warmth, anxiety, nausea, palpitations, a fast heart rate and hunger. Most true hypoglycemic people have three or four of these symptoms and not all of them. Very low blood sugar can cause fatigue, dizziness, headache, visual disturbances, drowsiness and ultimately loss of consciousness and seizures. Again, all people with very low blood sugar will most likely not have all symptoms. Occasionally, people get hypoglycemia because they're taking certain drugs such as aspirin-like drugs, quinine-like drugs and antipsychotics such as haloperidol, or consuming alcohol. Extreme exercise also can lead to this condition. By far the most common cause of hypoglycemia is treatment of diabetes that is too strict. Some diabetics can actually get hypoglycemic by missing a meal or having a meal with fewer starches and carbohydrates than expected. Very rarely, hypoglyc Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means low blood sugar. Symptoms include: As the term implies, low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, occurs when your brain and body are not getting enough sugar. For most people whose blood sugar is kept in the near normal range, less than 70 mg/dl can be considered low, or hypoglycemic. When you have type 2 diabetes and are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin, you are at risk for low blood sugars or hypoglycemia. It is very unlikely for individuals with type 2 diabetes who are only treated with lifestyle changes or blood sugar normalizing medications to have a low blood sugar. Acute Complication: Hypoglycemia Recognizing low blood sugar is important. Why? So that you can take steps to prevent a medical emergency. First symptoms of low blood sugar: Shaking, sweating, rapid heartbeat Change in vision Hunger Headache Sudden moodiness Severe symptoms of low blood sugar requiring immediate medical attention: Behavior changes Lack of coordination Inattention and confusion Seizures Loss of consciousness What causes low blood sugars? Monitoring your blood sugar often Staying alert for the first symptoms Keeping some sugar or sweet handy (and eating it as necessary) Despite all the safety planning, you still may get a low blood sugar when you are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin. So always wear your medical alert identification. And if you are taking insulin, have family members or friends trained to use a Glucagon Emergency kit. What causes hypoglycemic unawareness? Sometimes people treated with insulin releasing pills or insulin lose the ability to detect a low blood sugar – a condition known as hypoglycemic unawareness. Your brain has a trigger po Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia, means your body does not have enough sugar in the blood to fuel all of your body’s cells. Typically a low blood sugar is defined as anything below 70 mg/dL (3.8 mmol). It is also sometimes called an “insulin reaction” or “insulin shock”. When your blood sugars drops below this level, you may begin to feel a variety of symptoms. As your body runs short on fuel, you may feel shaky, nervous, anxious, or irritable. You may begin to sweat or get the chills. Your heart may race. As your brain operates on less sugar, you may feel confused or delirious or get a headache. Each person feels different low blood sugar symptoms. Some don’t feel any symptoms at all, which is called hypoglycemia unawareness. It is important to learn and recognize your own symptoms. Sometimes, you may feel like you have low blood sugar even when you don’t. This can happen when you have had a high blood sugar for a long-time, such as at diagnosis, and your body is first coming back into the normal range. Although it may feel unpleasant, these symptoms will go away in a week or two and you will feel better than you did when you had high blood sugars all of the time. You may also feel symptoms of low blood sugar when your blood sugar is dropping rapidly. Your body is sensing the rapid loss of sugar for fuel and sending you warning signals. Don’t guess whether or not you have a low blood sugar. It is important to use your blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar and confirm before treating it. Studies have shown people are not good at guessing their blood sugars (but often think that they are). According to the American Diabetes Association, if you feel symptoms of low blood sugar and are unable to test your blood sugar, err on the side of Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: Take Charge Of Your Lows

Hypoglycemia: Take Charge Of Your Lows

Hypoglycemia Do you worry about the dangers of low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia? Get ready for some good news. "The relative frequency of having severe hypoglycemia, even for people who take insulin, is exceedingly low," says William Polonsky, Ph.D., CDE, co-founder and president of the Behavioral Diabetes Institute in San Diego and author of Diabetes Burnout (American Diabetes Association, 1999). However, even mild or moderate hypoglycemia can be unsettling and should be treated. By understanding how hypoglycemia occurs, you'll know the fastest ways to treat it or prevent it from occurring in the first place. Time to brush up with a little Hypoglycemia 101. Note: It's a good idea to share hypoglycemia information with family members, friends, and coworkers, in case you experience symptoms and need help. Hypoglycemia Symptoms Hypoglycemia technically occurs when blood glucose dips below 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/l). Symptoms of low blood sugar can include, but aren’t limited to: • Shakiness • Dizziness • Sweating • Hunger • Headache • Pale skin • Clumsy or jerky movements • Sudden moodiness or behavior change • Difficulty focusing • Confusion • Tingling around the mouth However, similar symptoms can occur when your blood glucose isn't low. "You can experience the symptoms of hypoglycemia at higher blood glucose readings if your body isn't used to lower numbers or if your blood glucose drops rapidly," says Karen Bolderman, R.D., CDE, who's had type 1 diabetes for more than 40 years. Three Phases of Hypoglycemia There are three phases of hypoglycemia or low blood sugar: Mild hypoglycemia: At this phase, you're usually able to recognize the symptoms and treat yourself. Moderate hypoglycemia: Symptoms are more pronounced at this level. Your think Continue reading >>

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Caring for a pet with diabetes can be daunting. Fortunately, the key to successful diabetes management is simple: a consistent, established daily routine. A healthy diet is essential, and feeding your pet the same amount of food at the same time every day will help make blood sugar easiest to control. Your pet will usually also need twice-daily insulin injections, which should be given at the same time every day. (The easiest way to do this is to coordinate shots with mealtimes.) Routine daily exercise and regular at-home monitoring of urine and/or blood sugar round out a plan for good diabetic regulation. Even if you are following a consistent routine, a diabetic pet may occasionally experience an emergency. A number of different things can cause an emergency, but the most common is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. In this case, it is important that you be prepared in order to avoid a life-threatening situation. Hypoglycemia: Why It Happens Hypoglycemia most often results from accidental overdosage of insulin, but it can also occur if a pet is not eating well, misses a meal or vomits after eating, or if the type and amount of food he is being fed changes. Hypoglycemia may become a problem with very vigorous exercise; for this reason, regular daily controlled exercise is best. Hypoglycemia can also result if the body’s need for insulin changes. This scenario is particularly common in cats who often return to a non-diabetic state once an appropriate diet and insulin therapy start. Vet Tips Avoid “double-dosing” insulin. Only one person in a household should have the responsibility of giving insulin. A daily log should be kept of the time/amount of food and insulin that is given to avoid errors. Proper daily monitoring of blood and/or urine glucose can help identif Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low Blood Sugar: Causes, Warning Signs And Treatments

Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is the most common and most dangerous condition for many people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Very low blood sugar may lead to insulin shock, which can be life threatening if not treated promptly. Low blood sugar occurs when the body has too little food/glucose or too much insulin. The following are all potential reasons that a person with diabetes might have low blood sugar: Too much insulin taken Eating less than usual Eating later than usual Insulin was injected at a site on the body where the absorption rate is faster than usual Injecting extra insulin after forgetting about a previous dose More exercise than normal Illness or injury Other hormones Medication interaction The following is a list of general symptoms that indicate low blood sugar (the person with T1D may exhibit one or more of these and symptoms may change from event to event) Dizziness Nervousness Personality change/irrational behavior Blurry vision Shakiness Nausea Crying Sluggishness Sweating Poor coordination Hunger Lightheadedness Irritability Drowsiness Erratic response to questions Inability to concentrate Severe symptoms (symptoms as listed above, plus): Convulsions or seizure Loss of consciousness A blood-glucose meter reading below the target range specified by the physician indicates low blood sugar. The following are general treatments for low blood sugar. The physician and parents (for a child) should determine what course to follow. Please note that people with T1D have symptoms of low blood sugar at various readings. Some people with T1D feel perfectly fine at readings below 70. Others begin to show low blood-sugar symptoms at readings somewhat above 70. If blood-sugar levels are slightly low and the person is alert and lucid, he or she should: Not exercis Continue reading >>

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