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Low Blood Sugar Signs

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Low blood sugar, which is called hypoglycemia, means your body does not have enough sugar in the blood to fuel all of your body’s cells. Typically a low blood sugar is defined as anything below 70 mg/dL (3.8 mmol). It is also sometimes called an “insulin reaction” or “insulin shock”. When your blood sugars drops below this level, you may begin to feel a variety of symptoms. As your body runs short on fuel, you may feel shaky, nervous, anxious, or irritable. You may begin to sweat or get the chills. Your heart may race. As your brain operates on less sugar, you may feel confused or delirious or get a headache. Each person feels different low blood sugar symptoms. Some don’t feel any symptoms at all, which is called hypoglycemia unawareness. It is important to learn and recognize your own symptoms. Sometimes, you may feel like you have low blood sugar even when you don’t. This can happen when you have had a high blood sugar for a long-time, such as at diagnosis, and your body is first coming back into the normal range. Although it may feel unpleasant, these symptoms will go away in a week or two and you will feel better than you did when you had high blood sugars all of the time. You may also feel symptoms of low blood sugar when your blood sugar is dropping rapidly. Your body is sensing the rapid loss of sugar for fuel and sending you warning signals. Don’t guess whether or not you have a low blood sugar. It is important to use your blood glucose meter to check your blood sugar and confirm before treating it. Studies have shown people are not good at guessing their blood sugars (but often think that they are). According to the American Diabetes Association, if you feel symptoms of low blood sugar and are unable to test your blood sugar, err on the side of Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To Low Blood Sugar (hypoglycemia)

A A A Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar) Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is a commonly perceived problem. In actuality, while some or many of the symptoms may be present, it is rarely confirmed or documented. The presence of true, documented hypoglycemia in the absence of diabetes treatment must be evaluated comprehensively by an endocrinologist. Hypoglycemia most often affects those at the extremes of age, such as infants and the elderly, but may happen at any age. Generally, hypoglycemia is defined as a serum glucose level (the amount of sugar or glucose in your blood) below 70 mg/dL. As a medical problem, hypoglycemia is diagnosed by the presence of three key features (known as Whipple's triad). Whipple's triad is: symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia, a low plasma glucose concentration, and relief of symptoms after the plasma glucose level is raised. Symptoms of hypoglycemia typically appear at levels below 60 mg/dL. Some people may feel symptoms above this level. Levels below 50 mg/dL affect brain function. The body regulates its glucose level—the primary source of energy for the brain, muscles, and other essential cells - by the actions of different hormones. These hormones include insulin (which lowers the blood sugar level) and other chemicals which raise blood sugar (such as glucagon, growth hormone, and epinephrine). Both insulin and glucagon are manufactured in the pancreas, an organ near the stomach which assists the digestive tract. Special cells in the pancreas, called beta cells, make insulin. Alpha cells in the pancreas make glucagon. The role of insulin is to help in the absorption of glucose from the blood by causing it to be stored in the liver or be transported into other tissues of the body (for metabolism or storage). Glucagon increases the amount of Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes in an autoimmune disease where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce insulin—a hormone needed to convert food into energy. It affects children and adults, comes on suddenly, and it cannot be prevented or cured. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and dangerous occurance with type 1 diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low it may lead to insulin shock, which is life-threatening if not cared for. Low blood sugar can happen when your body has too little food—or glucose—or when it produces too much insulin. Type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia symptoms So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of low blood sugar will vary depending on the person. However, people with type 1 diabetes—whether it’s been diagnosed or not—may experience one or more of the following: -Sweating and shaking -Blurry vision -Poor coordination -Dizziness or feeling lightheaded -Difficulty concentrating -Feeling anxious or irritable -Hunger or nausea -Erratic changes in behavior What to do if you experience low blood glucose symptoms Severely low blood-sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemic seizures, unconsciousness, coma, and death if left untreated. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor if you think you have low blood sugar so he or she can check your blood-glucose levels—look into whether type 1 diabetes may be a cause—and provide the necessary treatment. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

A blood sugar level lower than about 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) is called hypoglycemia. The feelings associated with hypoglycemia are called an insulin reaction. The earliest symptoms of low blood sugar can be like the feelings many people experience when theyve gone without food for a long time: they may feel hungry, tired and irritable, and may even have a headache. These early warning signs tell us that the body needs sugar quickly. As the blood sugar continues to drop, other signs and symptoms may developshakiness, pale skin, cold sweat, dilated pupils, and pounding heart.These happen because the body is trying to boost the blood sugar from within.Certain hormones, including glucagons, adrenaline, cortisol, and growth hormone, stimulate our liver and muscles to convert stored sugar into glucose, which enters the bloodstream. In someone without diabetes, the body turns off the insulin supply whenever blood sugar is at a normal level. But in people with diabetes, the injected insulin continues to work. As fast as the glucose enters the bloodstream, the insulin pushes it into the cells, so the level of sugar in the blood remains low until the person takes extra sugar by mouth. Most people with type 1 diabetes have low blood sugar reactions from time to time an average of about two mild ones per week. Indeed, mild reactions that are easily recognized and treated, without too much interruption in activities, should be expected. They can be seen as the price paid for good glucose control. Note that some people have symptoms of hypoglycemia even when their blood sugar level is higher than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL). Common signs and symptoms of a mild insulin reaction shakiness: butterflies, feeling nervous for no reason cold, clammy sweatiness, unlike sweat from playing hard mood Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

Have you seen the video going viral on Facebook right now where four amazing women with type 1 diabetes talk about what low blood sugar feels like? I love this video, and it inspired me to think about what a low blood sugar feels like for me and to put it into words in this post. I think this is particularly useful for friends and family who may not know or understand what it’s like. Please watch the video and consider sharing this post with your loved ones if you feel that it helps explain how you feel when you have a low. No compatible source was found for this media. What low blood sugar feels like Trying to explain a feeling is always hard, and trying to explain something as unique as the feeling of low blood sugar (or hypoglycemia) is even harder. The physical aspects of a low are easier to describe, so let’s start with those. I almost always feel the signs of a low blood sugar before it becomes critical. I’ll feel it when my blood sugar is around 60 mg/dl (3 mmol/l). I’ll start shaking a little, my cognitive function goes out the window, I get weak, and I typically start sweating (these are the most common low blood sugar symptoms). A cup of juice or 2-3 glucose tabs will usually get me right back to normal pretty quickly and I’ll move on with my day. But when I don’t catch my symptoms before they get severe, and my sugars dip lower, then that’s a whole other story. This rarely happens during the day, since I can catch them before they get this bad, but it will sometimes happen in my sleep. I’ll wake up in the middle of the night and know it’s bad if I’ve had a stress dream (things will move excessively fast in my dream or I’ll be caught in a loop of some sort), I’m sweating profusely, and shaking. And then there’s the feeling! It an urge Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Sugar)

Introduction Hypoglycaemia, or a "hypo", is an abnormally low level of glucose in your blood (less than four millimoles per litre). When your glucose (sugar) level is too low, your body doesn't have enough energy to carry out its activities. Hypoglycaemia is most commonly associated with diabetes, and mainly occurs if someone with diabetes takes too much insulin, misses a meal or exercises too hard. In rare cases, it's possible for a person who doesn't have diabetes to experience hypoglycaemia. It can be triggered by malnutrition, binge drinking or certain conditions, such as Addison's disease. Read more about the causes of hypoglycaemia Symptoms of hypoglycaemia Most people will have some warning that their blood glucose levels are too low, which gives them time to correct them. Symptoms usually occur when blood sugar levels fall below four millimoles (mmol) per litre. Typical early warning signs are feeling hungry, trembling or shakiness, and sweating. In more severe cases, you may also feel confused and have difficulty concentrating. In very severe cases, a person experiencing hypoglycaemia can lose consciousness. It's also possible for hypoglycaemia to occur during sleep, which can cause excess sweating, disturbed sleep, and feeling tired and confused upon waking. Read more about the symptoms of hypoglycaemia Correcting hypoglycaemia The immediate treatment for hypoglycaemia is to have some food or drink that contains sugar, such as dextrose tablets or fruit juice, to correct your blood glucose levels. After having something sugary, you may need to have a longer-acting "starchy" carbohydrate food, such as a sandwich or a few biscuits. If hypoglycaemia causes a loss of consciousness, an injection of the hormone glucagon can be given to raise blood glucose levels and Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Topic Overview Symptoms of mild low blood sugar You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. Extreme hunger and slight nausea. Dizziness and headache. Blurred vision. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. Symptoms of moderate low blood sugar If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Muscle twitching. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: Seizure. Loss of consciousness (coma). Stroke. Death. Signs of low blood sugar at night If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sleepwalking. Nightmares. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Signs of hypoglycemic unawar Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Glucose: Know The Signs And Steps To Take

Treating Low Blood Glucose: Know The Signs And Steps To Take

You may recognize the feeling—feeling hungry, dizzy, sweaty or just a little bit "off." These signs of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, mean it's time to take action. What causes low blood glucose? For most people, low blood glucose refers to anything below 70 mg/dL, although your number may be different.1 Low blood glucose can be caused by taking too much medication, not having enough to eat or exercising. Don't be too hard on yourself, though. Just focus getting your blood sugar back in range, then consider what might have caused it to help prevent it next time. Low blood glucose warning signs Everyone is different, but low blood glucose is often marked by:2 Feeling weak, sleepy or light headed Trembling or shaking Sweating or chills Headache or lack of concentration Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Blurred vision Crying or irritability Fast heartbeat Hunger or nausea Not sure about how you're feeling? Check. After all, some the symptoms of high blood glucose, such as fatigue, headaches or trouble concentrating, can be similar to the symptoms of a low.2 A quick blood glucose test is the simple way to know for sure what's happening in your body. Some people don't feel any warning signs of low blood glucose. This is known as "hypoglycemia unawareness."1 If you can't feel low blood glucose coming on, talk to your healthcare provider about carefully monitoring your blood glucose levels, fine-tuning your insulin therapy to help you avoid lows. How to treat a low When you're low, you have one goal: bring up your blood glucose levels. Some people use the "15/15 Rule" as a reminder—eat 15 grams of carbohydrates, then wait 10 or 15 minutes and check your level again. Repeat this process as needed.3 For 15 grams of carbohydrates, try:1 1/2 cup of fruit juice or Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

What is hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the amount of blood glucose (sugar) in the blood is lower than normal (under 50 mg/dL). Who is affected by hypoglycemia in the newborn? Babies who are more likely to develop hypoglycemia include: Babies born to diabetic mothers may develop hypoglycemia after delivery when the source of glucose (via the umbilical cord) is gone and the baby's insulin production metabolizes the existing glucose. Small for gestational age or growth-restricted babies may have too few glycogen stores. Premature babies, especially those with low birthweights, who often have limited glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver) or an immature liver function. Babies born under significant stress. Babies who experience temperature instability (for instance, get cold) or when mothers were treated with certain drugs (for instance, terbutaline) Infants of diabetic mothers Babies who are large for their gestational age. This is associated with gestational diabetes, but also with forms of congenital hyperinsulinism What causes hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia may be caused by conditions that: Lower the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Prevent or lessen storage of glucose. Use up glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver). Inhibit the use of glucose by the body. Many different conditions may be associated with hypoglycemia in the newborn, including the following: Inadequate maternal nutrition in pregnancy Excess insulin produced in a baby of a diabetic mother Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn (incompatibility of blood types of mother and baby) Birth defects and congenital metabolic diseases Birth asphyxia Cold stress (conditions that are too cold) Liver disease Infection Why is hypoglycemia in the newborn a con Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar

Topic Overview Symptoms of mild low blood sugar You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. Extreme hunger and slight nausea. Dizziness and headache. Blurred vision. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. Symptoms of moderate low blood sugar If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Muscle twitching. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: Seizure. Loss of consciousness (coma). Stroke. Death. Signs of low blood sugar at night If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sleepwalking. Nightmares. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Signs of hypoglycemic unawar Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Insulin [en Español]

Diabetes: Dealing With Low Blood Sugar From Insulin [en Español]

Introduction Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs in people with diabetes when the sugar (glucose) level in the blood drops below what the body needs to function normally. If your blood sugar drops very low (usually below 20 mg/dL) and you do not get help, you could become confused or drowsy or even lose consciousness and possibly die. If you are pregnant, your baby could be harmed. Low blood sugar can develop if you take too much insulin, do not eat enough food or skip meals, exercise without eating enough, or drink too much alcohol (especially on an empty stomach). You can usually treat mild—and sometimes moderate—low blood sugar by eating something that contains sugar. You should teach your friends and coworkers what to do if your blood sugar is very low. How to deal with low blood sugar emergencies Here are some ways you can manage low blood sugar. Always be prepared for the possibility of having a low blood sugar level. Keep some quick-sugar foods with you at all times. If you are at home, you will probably already have something close at hand that contains sugar, such as table sugar or fruit juice. Carry some hard candy or glucose tablets with you when you are away from home. Quick-sugar foods are foods you need to eat to raise your blood sugar. Know the symptoms of low blood sugar , such as sweating, blurred vision, and confusion. Post a list of the symptoms where you will see it often, and carry a copy in your wallet or purse. Add any symptoms you have noticed that may not be on the list. Be sure that your partner (and others) knows your early symptoms, including the signs of low blood sugar at night. Wear medical identification. Always wear medical identification, such as a medical alert bracelet , to let people know that you have diabetes. In case your bl Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Tweet Knowing and understanding the symptoms of high and low blood sugar should be essential for both diabetics and their friends and families. Symptoms of high blood sugar Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is common amongst diabetics. It occurs when a diabetic person eats too much food, and has too little insulin to regulate their blood sugar. Sometimes stress can cause diabetes. Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Need for frequent urination Drowsiness Nausea Extreme hunger and/or thirst Blurring of the vision Symptoms of low blood sugar Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when a diabetic has not eaten enough food, or has too much insulin within his or her body. An excessive amount of exercise can also cause low blood sugar levels. Be aware of low blood sugar symptoms Being aware of the following symptoms and staying alert for their presence, whether you are a diabetic or a family member or friend, should be essential: Shaking Fast heartbeat Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Extreme hunger Weakness and tiredness Irritability Why do these symptoms matter for diabetics? These symptoms are essential for diabetics to understand, because they may encounter high or low blood sugar levels from time to time. A cold or virus can cause sudden high blood sugar levels, and understand the symptoms means knowing how to deal with hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. People with diabetes who can recognise the symptoms can avoid levels that lead to medical emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Knowing your high and low blood sugar symptoms allows you to test Once you understand symptoms of high and low blood sugar, it is possible to test quickly and avoid serious proble Continue reading >>

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

And Low Blood Sugar

And Low Blood Sugar

JANUMET tablets contain 2 prescription medicines: sitagliptin (JANUVIA®) and metformin. Once-daily prescription JANUMET XR tablets contain sitagliptin (the medicine in JANUVIA®) and extended-release metformin. JANUMET or JANUMET XR can be used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUMET or JANUMET XR should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUMET or JANUMET XR. Metformin, one of the medicines in JANUMET and JANUMET XR, can cause a rare but serious side effect called lactic acidosis (a buildup of lactic acid in the blood), which can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms, which could be signs of lactic acidosis: feel cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; have a slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual (not normal) muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. Most people who have had lactic acidosis with metformin have other things that, combined with the metformin, led to the lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following, because you have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with JANUMET or JANUMET XR if you: have severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in short-term “binge” drinking; get dehydrated (lose large amounts of body fluids, w Continue reading >>

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