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Low Blood Sugar Mood Swings

How Can Blood Sugar Changes Affect My Mood If I Have Diabetes?

How Can Blood Sugar Changes Affect My Mood If I Have Diabetes?

You can have emotional changes with high and low blood glucose. When blood glucose is high, you may feel tired and not have enough energy to get things done. You may also worry about getting a diabetes problem from constant high blood glucose. If your blood glucose is too low you may argue, not be able to think clearly, or need help getting something to eat. Fluctuations in blood sugars or sugars that are out of range can contribute to unexplained mood swings, irritability, or tearfulness. Altered glucose levels can also make it harder to concentrate and make you feel fatigued. Other affects on mood have been feeling jumpy, grouchy, or out of sorts. One source of emotional stability is good blood sugar control; levels that are in the healthy range actually enhance your sense of well-being. In addition, the diet and exercise habits that help control blood sugar are themselves mood-boosting. And of course, there's the sweet payoff of fitting back into that pair of jeans or hearing your doctor tell you that your A1c numbers have improved. You probably know of -- or have experienced firsthand -- the irritability, lethargy, and confusion that result from hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), but you may not realize that high blood sugar -- hyperglycemia -- can also throw you for a loop. While hypoglycemia's side effects are well-established, research is starting to document hyperglycemia symptoms. For instance, in a German study, people with type 1 diabetes wore a continuous glucose monitor (a device that senses and records blood sugar levels) for two days while documenting their mood seven times a day. When their blood sugar level rose over 180, people reported being more angry, tense, and unhappy than when it was between 70 and 180. During the study, participants couldn't see th Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am on two different types of insulin, NovoLog and Levemir (insulin detemir). Can diabetes have any bearing on mood swings or sudden “bad mood episodes”? Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

A prediabetes warning can be characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, and more. This phenomenon, despite how common it is, is not normal, nor is it healthy. It’s the classic sign of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and an early symptom of the prediabetes-related condition known as insulin resistance. Refined Carbs Can Cause Wild Mood Swings If you eat a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs, you will experience wild swings in blood sugar that make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. When you repeat this process day in and day out, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages (sodas, juices, sports drinks), your cells start to become resistant or numb to insulin. You end up needing more and more insulin to keep your blood sugars down. This is insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that has become an epidemic. What is Reactive Hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, dizziness, sweating, shakiness, palpitations, anxiety, nausea, a sensation of hunger, and difficulty with concentration which occur after eating an abundance of sugar or refined carbs. These reactive hypoglycemia symptoms occur in the early stages of insulin resistance. Take a typical breakfast these days: swigging a large sweetened coffee drink and grabbing something from the Starbucks pastry case will give you a big energy surge as your sugar and insulin levels spike. What follows, however, are inevitable sugar crash symptoms as your blood sugar plummets. With this comes the low blood sugar fatigue. Insulin Levels May Be the First Sign That Something is Wrong Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - A Hidden Hell

Hypoglycemia - A Hidden Hell

~ S P E C I A L ~ F E A T U R E ~ by Connie Bennett, M.S.J., C.H.H.C. an excerpt from the new book SUGAR SHOCK! How Sweets and Simple Carbs Can Derail Your Life -- And How You Can Get Back on Track by Connie Bennett, M.S.J., C.H.H.C. with Stephen T. Sinatra, M.D. Foreword by Nicholas Perricone, M.D. Published by Berkley Books Reprinted with Permission "Spills the beans on the shocking impact of simple carbohydrates on aging and quality of life..." -- Frequent Oprah Winfrey guest Mehmet C. Oz, M.D., coauthor, YOU: On A Diet INTRODUCTION This excerpt (from Chapter 13) tells the sad story of how millions of Americans are plagued by a mysterious constellation of symptoms but don't know what's wrong with them -- and often, neither do their doctors. Unfortunately, the physicians and loved ones of these ailing millions often wrongly assume that they're "hypochondriacs" or that they have a mental disorder. Worse yet, they think these symptoms are indicative of another disease or condition. Instead, these suffering millions may be victims of SUGAR SHOCK! They're suffering from reactive hypoglycemia, a condition that's often maligned and dismissed by members of the mainstream medical establishment. But cutting-edge nutritionists and medical practitioners contend that hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is rampant today and usually triggered by excessively consuming sweets or processed carbohydrates -- something most Americans do. Tragically, people who suffer from hypoglycemia are often misdiagnosed for years -- and even frequently advised to seek psychiatric counseling and/or take psychiatric drugs. But usually the best treatment for hypoglycemia is quite simple: Just kick all sugars and processed, "culprit carbs," and eat modest amounts of nourishing, wholesome foods five or six tim Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar And Mood: The Fine Art Of Balancing With Food

Blood Sugar And Mood: The Fine Art Of Balancing With Food

There are many benefits to balancing your blood sugar. When your blood sugar is on a roller coaster ride all day, so is your mood. Ever wonder why you get irritable and frustrated when you skip a meal? Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the reason behind this and something you want to try and avoid. Daily consumption of refined carbohydrates, alcohol, poor diet and skipping meals contribute to hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Not only do imbalanced blood sugars affect your physical health which puts stress on different body systems; they also affect your emotional well-being. Read more about hypoglycemia and marital stress Diabetic or not, keeping your blood sugar level balanced is important to your overall health. Learning to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia will help you in making preventative steps to achieve greater health. Symptoms of hypoglycemia usually present themselves before increased blood sugar levels do and are easier to recognize. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia: Headaches Depression Anxiety Shaky feeling Irritability Blurred vision Excessive sweating Confusion Incoherent speech Refined sugars in the diet are quickly absorbed into your bloodstream, resulting in an increase in blood sugar levels. This signals the pancreas to produce increased amount of insulin. Because of the increase in insulin symptoms of hypoglycemia can occur. The rapid drop in blood sugar levels can cause the adrenal glands to secrete cortisol. Over time your adrenal glands can also become exhausted. This situation can cause you to become depressed and emotional issues can present themselves. As you can see preventative, measures to eliminate low blood sugar reactions are the first step to achieving balance for emotional and physical health in your body. Read more about s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

How To Handle Anger During Low Blood Sugars

How To Handle Anger During Low Blood Sugars

by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E., and Ruth Roberts, M.A. Emotions and blood sugars are a two way street. Understanding their relationship can help in your blood sugar control. The brain controls the secretion of various stress hormones that can interfere with insulin's effectiveness. On the other hand, when high or low levels of sugar reach the brain, the result may be impaired memory, anger, irritability, slowed thinking, or depression. As blood sugars rise, the levels of hormones that prevent depression may be lowered. This can worsen symptoms of depression and leave a person with less interest in doing the things needed to improve control, such as thoughtful selection of food, regular exercise, and rest. A vicious cycle of growing depression and worsening control can arise. It helps in this altered situation for others to recognize as early as possible that a low blood sugar is taking place so that it may be treated quickly. People vary in how they experience a low blood sugar and how one individual may act during a particular low blood sugar can also vary tremendously. Here are common symptoms that indicate a low blood sugar is underway. Symptoms of Low Blood Sugars sweating shaking irritability blurred vision fast heart rate sudden tiredness dizziness and confusion numbness of the lips nausea or vomiting frequent sighing headache silliness tingling Adapted from Using Insulin © 2003. Walsh, Roberts, Varma, Bailey. Click here to order. Diabetes Response Service - the only scheduled pro active self-management Personal Call System using live operators to monitor, alert and prevent severe diabetic hypoglycemia. Continue reading >>

Managing Low Moods And Depression

Managing Low Moods And Depression

Tweet Struggling to manage difficult emotions and lows connected to diabetes is very common for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, those who are newly diagnosed and those who have been living with the condition for many years. Many of the challenges of daily life with diabetes or diabetes diagnosis can cause a whole range of emotional reactions including anger, hopelessness, fear, worry, bitterness, frustration irritability, guilt and shame. It's natural to feel low sometimes! These are strong emotions and are usually experienced as negative, and it is natural to feel ‘low’ when having to deal with these alongside diabetes. Feeling ‘low’ or ‘a bit down’ is different from feeling ‘depressed’, however depression is very common among people with diabetes and is unfortunately, often overlooked or not easily spotted by healthcare teams. Individuals with diabetes are twice as likely to experience depression as the general population. Coupled with this, it has been demonstrated that people with both diabetes and depression are far more likely to have poorer blood glucose management. So why do people with diabetes become depressed? The daily tasks of managing diabetes can be a huge challenge - juggling medication, injections, blood glucose monitoring, regular clinic visits along with all the usual stresses of life can put people with diabetes at real risk of developing difficulties with low mood. Not everyone with diabetes develops depression - why is this? Depression is caused by a combination of biological, psychological and social factors. This means that some people are more prone to developing difficulties managing low mood due to their family background; for example a family member with depression; and early experiences, for example bullying or l Continue reading >>

Food To Balance Your Mood

Food To Balance Your Mood

Think of your body as an insanely complex, gooey car. Put in gas and oil (a balanced diet), and you're good to go. Put in nicotine; alcohol; caffeine; weird, manufactured fats; gummy, washed-out flour; and sugar, and it's like pouring sugar into the gas tank. You'll sputter, run on, stop and start, or stall. Senior New York University clinical nutritionist Samantha Heller, MS, RD, would probably prefer an analogy to a chemistry set. "If you are chemically balanced," Heller contends, "your moods will be balanced." A lot of factors can throw the body out of balance. "A lot of women are anemic," she says. "This leads to depression and fatigue. Older people are often deficient in the B vitamins. People who don't eat regularly often have big shifts in blood sugar." People also have chemical sensitivities to certain foods that can govern mood. In a study of 200 people done in England for the mental health group known as Mind, participants were told to cut down on mood "stressors" they ate, while increasing the amount of mood "supporters." Stressors included sugar, caffeine, alcohol, and chocolate (more of that coming up). Supporters were water, vegetables, fruit, and oil-rich fish. Eighty-eight percent of the people who tried this reported improved mental health. Specifically, 26% said they had fewer mood swings, 26% had fewer panic attacks and anxiety, and 24% said they experienced less depression. One big set of chemicals that control mood are the neurotransmitters in the brain led by the pleasure "drug" serotonin. These substances determine whether you feel good and energetic or tired, irritable, and spacey. They run on sugar, preferably the form that comes from low glycemic carbohydrates (not doughnut sprinkles), according to Molly Kimball, RD, sports and lifestyle nutrit Continue reading >>

December 2012 – Children And Hypoglycemia: An Area Of Growing Concern

December 2012 – Children And Hypoglycemia: An Area Of Growing Concern

This past month the numbers of e-mails I have received concerning children and hypoglycemia have once again increased significantly. Therefore, I am including some of what I wrote in the chapter – “Children and Hypoglycemia: An Area of Growing Concern” – taken from my book, The Do’s and Don’ts of Hypoglycemia: An Everyday Guide to Low Blood Sugar. For the complete chapter and book, please consider giving it as a gift this Christmas or Hanukah. Not only can the information save a life but the proceeds from the sale of the book will go to support the HSF and allow us to continue our work. You can order your copy here… Since the HSF’s website premiered in 1998, I have received an alarming number of e-mails from parents, teenagers and teachers who openly shared their fears, frustrations, and concerns about hypoglycemia. I am including a few of the most notable here so you too can read what these children have been going through. Some of their names have been changed to protect their privacy. Although their messages are similar, one from Sandra of Cumming, Georgia, stands out. Dated October 25, 2000, it opened with this warm acknowledgement of the support we are providing and a request for more information. “Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and providing a superb web site. There is an area, however, that I found extremely little information and education on and perhaps you can provide enlightenment for those in need. It’s in regards to children and hypoglycemia. “My ten-year-old daughter is intelligent, bouncy and happy most of the time. But over a period of several months, she began to experience significant mood swings, excessive grumpiness, lack of concentration, headaches, etc. Her teacher, my adult friends, and my family related her beh Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

One danger of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is that you might not know you’re having it. Low glucose levels affect your brain and can leave you unable to recognize a problem or seek a solution. Low blood sugar is not a symptom of diabetes. It’s a side effect of diabetes treatment. It happens when you have too much insulin for the amount of food you have eaten. You can get hypoglycemia (high-po-glye-SEEM-e-uh) if you take insulin or if you take pills that stimulate your body to release insulin from the pancreas. These pills include sulfonylureas, such as chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide (Orinase). Other drugs that raise insulin and can lead to hypoglycemia include the meglitinides, such as repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix). Combination drugs that contain sulfonylureas or meglitinides can also potentially cause lows. You can see a more complete list of drugs that cause hypoglycemia here. If you have too much insulin and don’t eat enough, or you exercise too much, you will likely develop low blood sugar. The symptoms can range from annoying, like excessive sweating, to life-threatening, like passing out while driving or having seizures. Celia Kirkman, RN, CDE, wrote that “Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many functions.” You can’t pay attention to things, you’re less aware of your environment; you have less control of your emotions. This is what makes low blood sugar hard to treat and prevent. Your brain is supposed to pick up warning signs and address problems, but your brain is impaired by low glucose. Symptoms of low Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Much More Than Just Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia - Much More Than Just Low Blood Sugar

If you are experiencing an afternoon energy crisis – it could be low blood sugar, also medical termed hypoglycemia. Our team of experts dive deeper to discuss the causes and how to fix your low blood sugar to keep you energized all day long! If you are experiencing an afternoon energy crisis – it could be low blood sugar. You know how it goes—it's sometime between 2pm and 3pm, and you start to lose focus on what you are doing, and a nap begins to sound more and more appealing. A little brain fog sets in. May you start staring at the computer screen while your brain is zoning out. Yep—that a clear sign of a slightly lower-than-normal blood sugar. You're not alone, many Americans without diabetes experience "lows" sometime in the afternoon a couple hours after lunch. Mood swings are another sign that your blood sugar might be too low. Most people begin looking for an afternoon pick-me-up of coffee or some cookies, or a dose of nicotine. The medical term for low blood sugar is hypoglycemia. But hypoglycemia that happens because of insulin resistance, or pre-diabetes – is called reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive hypoglycemia is reported most frequently by women aged 25-35 years [Garza]. But men certainly experience this phenomenon as well. What Causes Hypoglycemia? Usually, low blood sugar can occur following a larger dose of simple carbohydrates and sugar. Reactive hypoglycemia is essentially the crash following dessert you feel at night. It can also happen after a ‘bender' night of drinking too much alcohol. If you begin to feel shaky and/or begin sweating, feel week, tired or dizzy the next morning, it's a good indicator that you are experiencing low blood sugar, or reactive hypoglycemia, caused by the interference of alcohol with your body's natural ability to Continue reading >>

Banish Low Blood Sugar To Improve Your Mood

Banish Low Blood Sugar To Improve Your Mood

Many mood disorders are related to hypoglycemia symptoms and carbohydrate addiction. Without reducing the intake of refined carbohydrates such as sugar, balancing mood will remain out of reach for the mood-disordered, and one may never know why. Hypoglycemia refers to low blood glucose, which is often associated with poor adrenal function. People under stress are vulnerable to functional or reactive hypoglycemia because stress negatively affects the regulation of blood glucose. Most patients who do not eat a healthy diet and binge on carbohydrates have hypoglycemia symptoms and do not know it. Many vegetarians experience it, since they often do not consume enough proteins to stabilize their low blood sugar. This syndrome causes mood lability and inattention, which is often misidentified as the rapid cycling of bipolar disorder or ADHD. Improve Hypoglycemia Symptoms: Mood Swings, Bipolar, & ADHD Recently, bipolar disease has become the diagnosis du jour, but without eliminating hypoglycemia as a cause of mood cycling, an accurate diagnosis cannot be made. I have treated many children and adults with severe mood swings and irritability, which is diminished or eliminated when the hypoglycemia and carbohydrate addiction are addressed. Other symptoms include irritability (due to hunger) and orthostatic hypotension, which occurs when one rises from a supine position to standing and becomes light-headed. This reflects adrenal fatigue, hypoglycemia, and often, low blood sugar, which can be addressed by adding a thiamine-rich B-vitamin complex. How Does Blood Sugar Work? Sugar derives from the sugar cane plant, a grass indigenous to the western hemisphere. Like many foods, the original whole food form is healthy, tasty, and rich in vitamins and minerals. It does not significantl Continue reading >>

Are Diabetics Angry...?

Are Diabetics Angry...?

(See Also: Diabetes and Anger -- Is there a Deeper Connection?) This angry diabetic has been really bewildered for the past few weeks with many new and personal challenges... As we know, life's problems do not stop at diabetes, or any other chronic illness, nor do they care if we're having to juggle other things. In fact, in the storm of life... sometimes when it rains, it just pours. (I need to buy a raincoat.) So, I thought... why not take a little time to address a common, and often overlooked, issue with diabetes? Anger. In the past few weeks, my blog has registered many, many Google searches for "anger and diabetes," "do diabetics suffer from anger," "do diabetics need anger management," etc. I fear many of these folks might be family members really wanting to understand, and care for their loved ones... or maybe folks just wanting to understand themselves a little better. Before I get a little further into the discussion, I want to add that while the emotions we experience through the ups and downs of illness, and life, are perfectly normal... this blog post is in NO WAY a justification for aggression, violence, or abuse. It might be an EXPLANATION of a course of events, but in the end... we are responsible for our own selves, and how we manage our health, and our emotions. Got that? Okay... :) Diabetes is a PERVASIVE disease... Now, in order to make some of kind of sense of the emotions a person with diabetes might feel, we need to understand one thing: Diabetes is a PERVASIVE life change. It is one of the most pervasive life changes an 'afflicted' person will ever have to face. While it may not seem as such in the beginning stages (especially for type 2, and often during a "honeymoon phase" for a type 1), with time, an individual will soon become painfully aware Continue reading >>

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