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Low Blood Sugar In Non Diabetics

Low Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise: Is Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia Threatening?

Low Blood Sugar Levels During Exercise: Is Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia Threatening?

Hypoglycemia is the term used for defining low blood sugar levels, and when we’re talking about non-diabetic hypoglycemia, we refer to below normal values of blood sugar that occur in people who aren’t affected by diabetes. The symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from one person to another, and can be accentuated by certain factors such as the lack of sleep, fasting or dehydration. Triggers of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic people can be very different, but today we’ll only discuss about exercise-induced low blood sugar levels, and we’ll try to understand why this symptom occurs, how threatening it is and how it can be prevented and managed. Exercise can decrease one’s blood sugar levels, but in healthy people the hypoglycemic episode is only temporary. If you constantly experience low blood sugar levels after or during exercise, it may be wise to schedule an appointment with your doctor and get tested for diabetes. Problems with the adrenal and pituitary glands, as well as liver problems, may also trigger hypoglycemic episodes, so it’s important to exclude any potential health issue from the list. Back to exercise-induced hypoglycemia: you probably experienced it several times after strenuous exercise, so the symptoms may sound very familiar. Hypoglycemia manifests through dizziness, headaches, inability to focus, shaking, sweating, blurred vision, irregular heartbeats, and even loss of coordination, anxiety and seizures if you don’t restore the glycogen reservoirs fast after the first symptoms occur. Why do these manifestations appear when exercising? Your body relies on glucose as its main fuel, so this form of sugar is the first one used by the organism for producing energy during exercise. The muscles and brain require glucose to function properly, and gl Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT IS NON-DIABETIC HYPOGLYCEMIA? Hypoglycemia is the condition when your blood glucose (sugar) levels are too low. It happens to people with diabetes when they have a mismatch of medicine, food, and/or exercise. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, a rare condition, is low blood glucose in people who do not have diabetes. There are two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia: Reactive hypoglycemia, which happens within a few hours of eating a meal Fasting hypoglycemia, which may be related to a disease Glucose is the main source of energy for your body and brain. It comes from what we eat and drink. Insulin, a hormone, helps keep blood glucose at normal levels so your body can work properly. Insulin's job is to help glucose enter your cells where it's used for energy. If your glucose level is too low, you might not feel well. You can have symptoms of hypoglycemia, but unless your blood glucose level is actually low when you have symptoms, you don't have hypoglycemia. WHAT CAUSES NON-DIABETIC HYPOGLYCEMIA? The two kinds of non-diabetic hypoglycemia have different causes. Researchers are still studying the causes of reactive hypoglycemia. They know, however, that it comes from having too much insulin in the blood, leading to low blood glucose levels. Type of Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia Possible Causes Reactive hypoglycemia Having pre-diabetes or being at risk for diabetes, which can lead to trouble making the right amount of insulin Stomach surgery, which can make food pass too quickly into your small intestine Rare enzyme deficiencies that make it hard for your body to break down food Fasting hypoglycemia Medicines, such as - salicylates (a type of pain reliever) - sulfa drugs (an antibiotic) - pentamidine (to treat a serious kind of pneumonia) - quinine (to treat malaria) Alcohol, esp Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Non-diabetic Cats

Hypoglycemia In Non-diabetic Cats

If your kitty has hypoglycemia, it means her blood sugar has dropped so low she is having neurological symptoms because her brain isn't getting enough fuel. Hypoglycemia is a symptom, not a disease, and is almost always related to diabetes. But even if your cat isn't diabetic, hypoglycemia in a kitty is always a medical emergency. Copious Vomiting Your non-diabetic cat can have an episode of hypoglycemia if she has an insulin spike. The most common cause of natural insulin spikes is excessive vomiting following a meal. Your kitty's pancreas naturally releases insulin at mealtime to break down her food. When the food comes back up, the excess insulin causes a sudden blood glucose drop. In this case, you'll have to find and treat the cause of vomiting after you stabilize her blood sugar levels. Anorexia Anorexia doesn't mean your kitty's starving herself to fit into that prom dress. In animals, anorexia refers to any refusal to eat for a prolonged period, regardless of the cause. Parasites, bacterial and viral infections, tumors, organ diseases, pain and stress can all cause anorexia. Hypoglycemia can result directly from your kitty's anorexia -- her body simply uses up all its fuel -- or it can be the result of anorexia-induced liver damage. Loss of fuel kills off liver cells, which screws up blood insulin levels, resulting in screwed up levels of glucose. Infections and Tumors Liver and pancreas diseases are major culprits when it comes to hypoglycemia in non-diabetic cats. Any infection or toxin-related damage to these organs can cause an insulin spike and glucose plummet. If your kitty has been accidentally exposed to any poisons or a medication overdose right before a hypoglycemic episode, suspect liver damage. If she's vomiting bile (yellow or green slime), suspect Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Non-diabetic Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

The body needs glucose for energy; it is especially critical for the brain and the rest of the central nervous system. While most cases of low blood sugar are due to the effects of medications for diabetes, some cases are unrelated. Patients experiencing non-diabetic low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, usually experience symptoms and quickly eat or drink something containing carbohydrates. Uncorrected hypoglycemia can lead to coma or death. Hunger Fortunately, the body usually alerts us to a drop in blood sugar by causing us to feel hungry. It is common to crave something sweet, such as a milkshake or soda, which will quickly raise blood sugar. Shakiness A person suffering hypoglycemia may be shaky. This is often accompanied by sweating and an increase in heart rate. Weakness Low blood sugar may make a person feel weak and dizzy. She may feel as though she is about to pass out. It may be hard to fully rouse her, and her movements may be clumsy and uncoordinated. It is not unusual for the patient to spill her drink as she is trying to consume it. Headache Headache is a classic sign of dropping blood sugar. According to the Mayo Clinic, blurry vision may also be present. Some people have double vision, making eating or drinking difficult. Confusion The lack of glucose in the brain may quickly lead to confusion. The person may be cranky, nervous or have poor inhibition of what he says to others. His speech may be slurred; this is sometimes confused with drunkenness. Nausea Drugs.com describes nausea as another indicator of hypoglycemia. The person may be warm to the touch and complain of tingling skin. How to Avoid Recurrent hypoglycemia should be treated by a physician. To avoid symptoms, eat five small meals spread throughout the day. Eat an early breakfast and Continue reading >>

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

Diabetes The Basics: Blood Sugars: The Nondiabetic Versus The Diabetic

BLOOD SUGARS: THE NONDIABETIC VERSUS THE DIABETIC Since high blood sugar is the hallmark of diabetes, and the cause of every long-term complication of the disease, it makes sense to discuss where blood sugar comes from and how it is used and not used. Our dietary sources of blood sugar are carbohydrates and proteins. One reason the taste of sugar—a simple form of carbohydrate—delights us is that it fosters production of neurotransmitters in the brain that relieve anxiety and can create a sense of well-being or even euphoria. This makes carbohydrate quite addictive to certain people whose brains may have inadequate levels of or sensitivity to these neurotransmitters, the chemical messengers with which the brain communicates with itself and the rest of the body. When blood sugar levels are low, the liver, kidneys, and intestines can, through a process we will discuss shortly, convert proteins into glucose, but very slowly and inefficiently. The body cannot convert glucose back into protein, nor can it convert fat into sugar. Fat cells, however, with the help of insulin, do transform glucose into fat. The taste of protein doesn’t excite us as much as that of carbohydrate— it would be the very unusual child who’d jump up and down in the grocery store and beg his mother for steak or fish instead of cookies. Dietary protein gives us a much slower and smaller blood sugar effect, which, as you will see, we diabetics can use to our advantage in normalizing blood sugars. The Nondiabetic In the fasting nondiabetic, and even in most type 2 diabetics, the pancreas constantly releases a steady, low level of insulin. This baseline, or basal, insulin level prevents the liver, kidneys, and intestines from inappropriately converting bodily proteins (muscle, vital organs) into g Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Blood sugar levels that drop too low can be just as dangerous as high blood sugar levels. This is especially a concern for diabetics, but nondiabetics can develop symptoms and health problems as well. To avoid complications it is important to be familiar with the warning signs of low blood sugar and what the common triggers are. If caught early, raising blood sugar levels with food can help avoid a life-threatening situation. Video of the Day Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is diagnosed when blood sugar or blood glucose levels drop below normal. Glucose is the primary source of fuel for the body and without enough of it, symptoms and health problems can occur. After a meal the food is broken down into glucose and either used immediately for energy or it is stored for use later on. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, when blood glucose levels drop too low, the pancreas signals the liver to release the stored glucose into the bloodstream, until levels return to normal. If not enough glucose is available, symptoms can occur. For those without diabetes, normal fasting blood glucose levels should be between 70 to 99 mg/dL and between 70 to 140 mg/dL after eating a meal. Without enough glucose the body will not be able to function normally. Early warning signs of low blood sugar include hunger, fatigue, sweating, headaches, shakiness, dizziness, weakness, confusion, difficulty coordinating movement, anxiety, problems with vision, upset stomach and trouble speaking, Medline Plus states. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can cause fainting, a loss of consciousness, irregular heartbeats, tremors, seizures and coma. In severe cases it can be fatal. In those without diabetes, low blood sugar levels are usually caused by skipping meals or heavy alcohol con Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check your blood sugar levels. Some tests might include not eating (fasting) and watching for symptoms. Other tests might involve eating a meal that could cause symptoms of low blood sugar seve Continue reading >>

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

What causes hypoglycemia? iStock/Erna Vader Taking certain diabetes medications, skipping meals, not consuming enough carbs, and even too much exercise can throw your blood sugar off balance and cause low blood sugar. Insomnia and excessive alcohol consumption have also been linked to low glucose levels. When blood sugar dips to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning—in most people, that's below 70 mg/dl—it results in a hypo attack with varying symptoms depending on its severity. People who have recurring bouts of low blood sugar may have no warning signs at all, explains Michael Bergman, MD, endocrinologist and clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness; the longer you’ve had diabetes, the more common it is. On the milder end of the low blood sugar spectrum, you may feel hungry, nauseated, jittery, nervous, and have cold and clammy-feeling skin. Many people also describe the feeling that their heart is racing or pounding. Low blood sugar can happen at night, too, causing nightmares and night sweats. Moderate low blood sugar can cause behavioral changes, making you fearful, confused, or angry. It can also trigger blurry vision, slurred speech, and problems with balance and walking. A layperson may even mistake you for being drunk. If left untreated, severe low blood sugar can cause loss of consciousness, seizures, irreversible brain or heart damage, coma, or even death. Here are first aid tips to handle a diabetic emergency. iStock/Geber86 It goes like this: If your blood sugar reading is low (below 70 mg/dl), eat or drink something equal to 15 grams of fast-acting carbohydrate (4 ounces of juice). Even if you feel okay, don't wait for the symptoms of hypoglycemia to kick in. Rest for 15 mi Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes the sugar (glucose) in your blood to drop too low. This can happen in people who do not have diabetes. The 2 types of non-diabetic hypoglycemia are fasting hypoglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia often happens after the person goes without food for 8 hours or longer. Reactive hypoglycemia usually happens about 2 to 4 hours after a meal. When your blood sugar level is low, your muscles and brain cells do not have enough energy to work well. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Fasting hypoglycemia: Certain medicines or herbal supplements such as fenugreek, ginseng, or cinnamon Alcohol Exercise Medical conditions such as liver disease, hypothyroidism, and tumors Eating disorders or malnutrition Stomach surgery or hemodialysis Reactive hypoglycemia: The causes of reactive hypoglycemia may be unknown. Hyperinsulinism Meals high in refined carbohydrates such as white bread or foods high in sugar Prediabetes Any surgery of the digestive system What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Blurred vision or changes in vision Dizziness, lightheadedness, or shakiness Fatigue and weakness Fast or pounding heartbeat Sweating more than usual Headache Nausea or hunger Anxiety, Irritability, or confusion How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia diagnosed? Blood tests are done to measure your blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. You may have an overnight fasting test or a 72-hour fasting test. After you have fasted overnight, your blood sugar levels will be tested 2 times. For a 72-hour fasting test, you will not be given food for a period of up to 72 hours. During th Continue reading >>

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is often thought about as part of diabetes, but there is also non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is just as equally problematic. When blood sugar is too low, the cause is not as important as realizing the impact. Some of the effects of hypoglycemia are immediate while others take time to manifest, resulting in long term deficits in your health. What is Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, which again is the same as low blood sugar, is most often thought about in diabetics. This group of individuals often uses medications, including insulin, to lower their glucose, which is often high. When their glucose drops too low as a result of the medication, they are considered in a hypoglycemic state. However, an entire different segment of the population deals with non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs for reasons that are almost the exact opposite of why someone would develop diabetes. While diabetes arises as a result of excess carbohydrates in the diet, non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs from a lack of carbohydrates in the diet. Carbohydrates are essential as the preferred energy source for our body. Yes, the total amount of carbohydrate and the source should factor in, but carbohydrates are necessary. In addition to not eating enough carbohydrates, insufficient production of hormones and neurotransmitters (nervous system communicators) can lead to non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Contrary to common medical thought, this does not require the presence of a named disease of the glands that produce the chemicals that helps us keep glucose balanced. 4 Clues that You May Have Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Fatigue: The Number One Symptom of Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is the same as low blood sugar. Blood Continue reading >>

When A Diabetic Dates A Non-diabetic

When A Diabetic Dates A Non-diabetic

WRITTEN BY: Forester McClatchey One morning when my older brother Mason was in college (I have two brothers, and all three of us are diabetic), his girlfriend received a strange phone call from an unknown number. She picked up, and a voice belonging to Mason’s roommate explained that he’d just found Mason passed out, naked, on the floor. He’d woken up low and disoriented, and had decided that the only way to get down from his top bunk was via front flip. He failed to land the flip. He lay on the floor with a broken tailbone, and that’s how his roommate found him. Mason’s girlfriend immediately went to check on him, skipping class. Years later they would marry, so this story ends happily, but that particular moment demonstrated why it’s hard, as a diabetic, to date. Any nascent relationship is fraught with anxiety as each party tries to present themselves in the best possible light. Each person tries to hide their blemishes, and I suspect that most diabetics fear that their disease will be perceived as a blemish. Of course, you can’t hide your diabetes. Not for very long, anyway. Nor should you try. Once your partner or date knows you’re diabetic, you have to explain to them what this will mean for the relationship. Low blood sugars, high blood sugars, stress regarding meals, random and frightening episodes involving you naked and injured on the floor: all of these things will complicate an already complicated mode of human interaction. They must grow into this knowledge. As your partner starts understanding the disease and its effects, you must also begin to negotiate how you will and won’t let diabetes come between you, which is tricky. There have been times when I’ve had to dismiss myself from an argument because I could tell that a high sugar leve Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Go to: ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the evaluation and management of hypoglycemia in patients without diabetes. Methods: Review of literature for the evaluation and management of non-diabetic hypoglycemia using Medline and PubMed. Results: Hypoglycemia (glucose <55 mg/dL) is uncommon in people without diabetes. Whipple’s triad (low plasma glucose concentration, clinical signs/symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia, and resolution of signs or symptoms when the plasma glucose concentration increases) should be documented in patients prior to embarking on evaluation. Medications should be reviewed. Critical illnesses, malnutrition, hormone deficiencies especially adrenal insufficiency, and nonislet cell tumors secreting IGF-II need be considered in those who are ill. Hypoglycemia can also follow bariatric surgery. In apparently healthy individuals, endogenous hyperinsulinism due to insulinoma, functional β-cell disorders, or the insulin autoimmune syndrome are possible, as are accidental, surreptitious or factitious causes of hypoglycemia. Tests performed during hypoglycemia can establish the cause in those whom illness or medications are not the cause. Testing may be done at the time of spontaneous development of symptoms. If this is not possible, it can be done in the setting of a prolonged supervised fast or during a mixed meal test. Endogenous hyperinsulinism is supported by insulin ≥3 uU/mL, c-peptide ≥0.2 nmol/L, proinsulin ≥5 pmol/L, β-hydroxybutyrate ≤2.7 mmol/L and undetectable sulfonylurea/meglitinide in the setting of hypoglycemia. Use of glucagon tolerance tests, c-peptide suppression tests, anti-insulin antibody testing and continuous glucose monitoring are discussed. Congenital causes of hypoglycemia, diagnosed primarily in neonates and children Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

Hypoglycaemia (low Blood Glucose) In Non-diabetic People

What is hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose)? Hypoglycaemia or low blood glucose is a condition in which the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood, drops below a certain point (about 2.5mmol/l). The condition manifests itself by a number of symptoms that usually disappear 10 to 15 minutes after eating sugar. People differ slightly in the exact level of blood glucose at which they begin to feel symptoms of low blood sugar. Insulin is normally produced in the pancreas and helps the cells in the body absorb glucose from the blood. Normally, the glucose level rises after a meal. Too much insulin in the blood and other diseases can cause hypoglycaemic episodes (also known as 'hypos'). What can cause hypoglycaemic episodes in non-diabetic patients? Too much insulin in the blood: reactive hypoglycaemia (see below) a tumour – very often benign – in the insulin-producing pancreas. This is a very rare condition indeed Other diseases: a disease in the adrenal glands (Addison's disease) a weakened pituitary gland a severe reduction in liver function patients who have had their stomach removed fasting, malnutrition Reactive hypoglycaemia is possibly the most common reason for hypoglycaemia in non-diabetics but is often overdiagnosed. This form of hypoglycaemia is probably caused by an overproduction of insulin from the pancreas after a large meal with a lot of carbohydrates. The insulin can still be detected even after several hours, although the level should be back to normal at this time. This condition is probably most common in overweight people and those with Type 2 diabetes, where the large demand for insulin can sometimes cause too much insulin to be produced in the pancreas. There is some evidence to suggest that reactive hypoglycaemia can precede Type 2 diabetes. What happ Continue reading >>

Can Low Blood Sugar Or High Blood Sugar Cause Nightmares?

Can Low Blood Sugar Or High Blood Sugar Cause Nightmares?

Both low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) can cause any of a list of reactions in the body. Among these are sleep disturbances, which may manifest as nightmares. Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia has many causes. We all require certain levels of glucose in our systems to maintain energy levels. For the non-diabetic, in the absence of certain disorders, this is generally not an issue, as the metabolic process automatically balances the levels of glucose and insulin in our bodies. For the diabetic, particularly one who is using insulin and/or other medications to manage their glucose levels, continuing balance might be more difficult to achieve. Some causes of hypoglycemia include an overdose of insulin; a dose of insulin combined with a skipped meal; a reaction to a combination of diabetic medications; exercise that isn’t factored into insulin dosing; or any of a number of other medical problems, including tumors and hormonal disorders. Once blood sugar drops below certain levels, the body releases epinephrine, signaling an emergency to the body. This in turn causes the symptoms experienced by those who have hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia does not only occur during the day. In fact, the onset of hypoglycemia during the nighttime hours is not at all uncommon. While it might be easy to spot the symptoms of a serious drop in blood sugar levels while awake (shakiness, sweating, confusion, blurred vision, tingling or numbness of the tongue or lips, lightheadedness or dizziness, among other symptoms), recognizing the problem during the night is more difficult, and potentially more critical. Nighttime onset of hypoglycemia can manifest as nightmares or crying out during sleep, excessive sweating, and confusion and irritability upon waking. It is critical to Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Normally, hypoglycemia, also referred to as low blood sugar, is found in diabetic patients who take too much insulin or too much of their diabetic medications. Both type 1 diabetics and type 2 diabetics can suffer from hypoglycemia; however, it is seen more commonly in type 1 diabetics who use insulin. Hypoglycemia can be found in non-diabetics, however, and is due to many reasons. The Definition of Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar is defined as a blood sugar level below a certain level, usually about 60-70 mg/dL. You may have experienced it by feeling extremely hungry or weak. It can occur after exercising a lot without having eaten something to sustain you prior to exercise. This type of hypoglycemia is common and has probably been experienced by everyone at some time in their lives. Low blood sugar can also be a medical problem unrelated to exercise. This type of hypoglycemia results when the level of blood glucose in the bloodstream is too low to provide energy to the body. Causes of Hypoglycemia in the absence of Diabetes You can have hypoglycemia even if you aren’t diabetic and aren’t taking insulin. Common causes of hypoglycemia without diabetes include the following: Surgery on the stomach Use of alcohol Metabolic disorders Problems with the pancreas Problems with the kidneys Problems with the liver Certain medications Symptoms of Hypoglycemia in the absence of Diabetes The symptoms you experience from low blood sugar levels depend on how low the blood glucose level decreases. There are a few different types of hypoglycemia, including these: Mild hypoglycemia. When you have mild hypoglycemia, you can feel hungry or perhaps nauseous. You may have a rapid heart rate and may feel nervous or jittery. You may develop sweatiness and your skin might turn clammy and Continue reading >>

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