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Low Blood Sugar Eye Problems

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

High And Low Blood Sugar Issues

Blood sugar concentrations or blood glucose levels are the amount of sugar or glucose present in your blood stream. Your body naturally regulates blood sugar (glucose) levels as a part your body”s metabolic processes. Glucose or sugar is the primary energy mechanism for cells and blood lipids. Glucose or blood sugar is transported from your intestines or liver to the cells in your body via the bloodstream. The absorption of glucose is promoted by insulin or the hormone produced in the pancreas. If your sugar levels are not balanced you may have high or low blood sugar issues. Low sugar issues are hypoglycemia and high blood sugar indicates that you have hyperglycemia or hyperglycemia symptoms. High or low blood sugar levels cause different problems. Low blood sugar levels can cause dementia, comas or death. High blood sugar is a major cause of damage to your body”s internal organs. Low Blood Sugar Low blood sugar or hypoglycemia indicates the level of glucose in your blood has dramatically dropped below what your body need to function. When your blood sugar drops below 70 milligrams per deciliter symptom will develop. You may feel tired and anxious or weak and shaky. Your heart rate may be rapid and you feel as if you are having a heart attack. Eating something sugary will bring your sugar levels back to normal almost immediately and symptoms will subside. Sugar levels that are below 40 mg/dL cause you to have behavior changes. You may feel very irritable and become weak and confused. You may not realize you need to eat to raise your blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels below 20 mg/dL will most certainly cause a loss of consciousness or perhaps you will experience seizures. You will need medical care immediately. Hypoglycemia symptoms happen very quickly. If you a Continue reading >>

Work With Your Ohio State Specialists To Prevent Complications Of Diabetes.

Work With Your Ohio State Specialists To Prevent Complications Of Diabetes.

If you are diagnosed with diabetes, it is critically important that you work with your Ohio State doctor to manage your diabetes so that you can maintain your health and longevity. Without proper management of diabetes, blood sugar (glucose) levels can remain high and lead to serious, irreversible health complications. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to problems with the heart, eyes, feet, kidneys and nerves. It can also result in skin disorders, digestive conditions, sexual dysfunction and problems with the gums or teeth. Low blood sugar can also result if diabetes is not managed well. Diabetes and Heart Disease If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes (higher than normal blood sugar, but not high enough to be considered diabetes), you have an increased risk for heart disease. Diabetes can increase the risk of coronary heart disease, heart failure and diabetic cardiomyopathy. In addition to being diabetic, other factors that put you at risk for heart disease include: Family history of heart disease Extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Others have some or all of the symptoms of heart disease. It’s important to talk with your doctor about reducing your risk for heart disease, even if you don’t notice any symptoms. Lifestyle changes can help lower the risk of heart disease. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active and quitting smoking. Treatments may include medications to lower your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol or to treat any heart damage that may have occurred. In some cases, surgery or another medical procedure may be needed. Learn more about heart care at Ohio State. Diabetic Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

The Purpose of this Pamphlet A Wide-Spread Little Understood Condition Do You Have Low Blood Sugar? Dangers of Self-Diagnosis and Self-Treatment How to Find A Physician? Diagnosis Explanation of Hypoglycemia Diet Treatment Permitted Foods Forbidden Foods Drugs to Avoid Adrenocortical Extract (ACE) Other Parts of the Treatment History of a Boy with Symptoms of Hypoglycemia Literature Books Pamphlets and, Articles ... is to promote intelligent cooperation of patients with physicians. Patients will be able to notice and describe possible low blood sugar conditions and thus help their physicians in the correct diagnosis. They understand the meaning of restrictions before and during the glucose tolerance test and the purpose of other examinations. They will intelligently adhere to the prescribed diet because they understand the undesirable effect of the forbidden food items. Physicians save time in explaining their procedure by advising patients to read this pamphlet. They need to answer individual questions only. This time saving has an advantage to the patients; also, because it makes their visits shorter and less expensive At home they can study the instructions at leisure and will not forget them, because they have them in writing. The content of this pamphlet is compiled from the medical literature listed on pages 30 to 32. Books are quoted by name of author, title and page number. Though the writers of these books agree in general, there is some disagreement among them regarding the causes, diagnosis and treatment. All the books contain some new and practical information. Try to read as many of them as you can. Ask your public library to acquire these books. To the best of our knowledge and belief the information we give and any opinions or suggestions we offer are sou Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Low Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hypoglycemia in Dogs The medical term for critically low levels of sugar in the blood is hypoglycemia, and it is often linked to diabetes and an overdose of insulin. The blood sugar, or glucose, is a main energy of source in an animal's body, so a low amount will result in a severe decrease in energy levels, possibly to the point of loss of consciousness. There are conditions other than diabetes that can also cause blood sugar levels to drop to dangerous levels in dogs. In most animals, hypoglycemia is actually not a disease in and of itself, but is only an indication of another underlying health problem. The brain actually needs a steady supply of glucose in order to function properly, as it does not store and create glucose itself. When glucose levels drop to a dangerously low level, a condition of hypoglycemia takes place. This is a dangerous health condition and needs to be treated quickly and appropriately. If you suspect hypoglycemia, especially if your dog is disposed to this condition, you will need to treat the condition quickly before it becomes life threatening. Symptoms Loss of appetite (anorexia) Increased hunger Visual instability, such as blurred vision Disorientation and confusion – may show an apparent inability to complete basic routine tasks Weakness, low energy, loss of consciousness Anxiety, restlessness Tremor/shivering Heart palpitations These symptoms may not be specific to hypoglycemia, there can be other possible underlying medical causes. The best way to determine hypoglycemia if by having the blood sugar level measured while the symptoms are apparent. Causes There may be several causes for hypoglycemia, but the most common is the side effects caused by drugs that are being used to treat diabetes. Dogs with diabetes are given insulin to help Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Short Term Problems

Diabetes: Short Term Problems

Complications Diabetes can cause other health problems. Sometimes these problems are referred to as complications (COM-pli-KAY-shuns). Short-term problems can happen at any time when you have diabetes. Long-term problems may develop when you have diabetes for a long time. In case of emergency, you should always wear a form of medical identification (ID). Examples are ID bracelets and necklaces. To reduce your risk of getting other health problems from diabetes, you need good control of your blood glucose (sugar). Good control means keeping blood glucose at certain levels. To learn more about good control and healthy blood glucose numbers, see the UPMC patient education page Diabetes: Your Management Plan. This patient education sheet tells you about short-term problems, what to do for them, and how to prevent them: Low blood glucose High blood glucose with ketones High blood glucose without ketones Low Blood Glucose Low blood glucose is also called hypoglycemia (HI-po-glice-EE-me-uh). Blood glucose numbers under 70 mean you have low blood glucose. Several things can cause low blood glucose: Too much insulin Too much sulfonylurea (SULL-fon-ilyour-EE-uh) medicine Not enough food Too much exercise Symptoms of low blood glucose include: Hunger Feeling nervous Heavy sweating Weakness Shaking (tremors) Confusion Seizures Coma If you get low blood glucose If you get low blood glucose and you are awake and able to swallow, eat or drink something with sugar. Here is a list of some suggested foods: 4 ounces of fruit juice 4 to 6 ounces of sugary (non-diet) soft drink 3 to 4 glucose tablets (or 1 tube of glucose gel) 1 cup of skim milk 6 to 7 hard candies (not sugar-free), such as Lifesavers Wait for 10 to 15 minutes. Test your blood glucose again. If your blood glucose is above 7 Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

High And Low Blood Sugar Levels & Symptoms

It is important for people with diabetes to know the symptoms of high and low sugar levels so appropriate action can be taken to prevent health problems occurring in either the short or long term. In the case of low blood glucose levels, it is generally only people on certain medications such as insulin and tablets which directly stimulate insulin production that need to be actively aware of low blood sugar symptoms. Symptoms of high sugar levels (hyperglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms are common when blood glucose levels are too high: Increased urination Increased thirst Increased hunger Fatigue Dry mouth Dry eyes Blurred vision If sugar levels are regularly too high for a number of days or weeks, the following symptoms may also be recognised: Loss of weight, particularly muscle mass Regular urinary tract infections (UTIs) Regular episodes of thrush (yeast infections) Note that in people that are overweight, loss of weight may sometimes be more recognisable as a loss of muscle mass. High blood sugar can be uncomfortable and can increase the risk of developing long term complications if extended periods of hyperglycemia become a regular occurrence. Read more about hyperglycemia. Symptoms of low sugar levels (hypoglycemia) One or more of the following symptoms may be recognised if blood glucose levels become too low: Increased hunger Pale appearance Feeling weak Lethargy Faster heart rate Sweating Blurred vision Dizzy spells Reduced co-ordination Impaired ability to make decisions Hypoglycemia, or hypos for short, can be dangerous for people on the following anti-diabetic medications: Insulin Sulphonylureas Prandial glucose regulators (glinides) People with diabetes on these medications need to be able to spot the signs of low blood sugar levels quickly and Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blindness - Retinopathy

Diabetic Blindness - Retinopathy

Retinopathy means "sick retina" and it is among the most terrifying of diabetic complications. What happens in retinopathy is that, with continual exposure to high blood sugars, tiny blood vessels start to grow in a disordered and out of control fashion in the retina--the part of the eye where nerves transmit light images to the brain. Unlike healthy vessels, these diabetic blood vessels have weak walls, and eventually they burst, releasing blood into the eye. Not only that, but if they are left untreated, these overgrown vessels eventually destroy the retina's ability to transmit images to the brain, resulting in permanent blindness. There are various terms doctors use to refer to retinopathy. One is "proliferative retinopathy" referring to the way that the tiny blood vessels proliferate. Another is "macular edema" referring to swelling in the part of the retina that gives us central vision. Actos and Avandia have been found to cause an increase in macular edema which is a major reason they are probably the last drug anyone with diabetes should be taking. Doctors currently treat retinopathy by using lasers to zap shut bleeding or swollen blood vessels in the eye. This helps retain vision, though it cannot restore vision that has been lost. Over time if blood sugars continue to be high--200 mg/dl (11 mmol/l) or more-- vision will deteriorate despite with this treatment. The only way to reverse retinopathy is to get blood sugars down to truly normal levels--not the levels flagged as "good for diabetics" but normal levels. That is because recent research has found retinopathic changes happening in the eyes of 1 out of ever 12 people diagnosed with prediabetes, so just getting your blood sugars to the mediocre levels most doctors suggest for people with diabetes (well with Continue reading >>

The High Blood Sugar Connection To Eye Diseases

The High Blood Sugar Connection To Eye Diseases

Before starting with Nutritional Weight & Wellness, I never would have guessed my morning bowl of Kashi cereal with skim milk and a banana could lead me down a road towards cataracts, glaucoma or macular degeneration. But now I know that these "healthy" foods were actually setting me up for a blood sugar rollercoaster. Each of these foods (cereal, skim milk and even the banana) is high in carbohydrates, which break down into sugar in the bloodstream. When carbohydrates are eaten in the right amounts and come from unprocessed foods (fruits, veggies and beans), just the right amount of insulin is released. However, when too much carbohydrate or sugar is consumed, the body releases too much insulin. Excess sugar and insulin cause inflammation and are very damaging to blood vessels—including the tiny blood vessels in our eyes. Read on to learn more about the high blood sugar connection to eye diseases. Cataracts A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye. The lens is normally clear and used to bring objects into focus by changing their shape from very flat to round. There are several different types of cataracts, but the most common is age related. Just like hair and nails, the lens of the eye continually breaks down and regenerates, and over time its ability to do so diminishes. High blood sugars can lead to swelling within the lens, creating bubble-like pockets known as vacuoles. Imagine trying to look through a pair of binoculars with water spots on it; you will never be able to focus enough to see clearly. Surgery is often the go-to solution for people with advanced cataracts. However, according to Dr. Richard Bernstein, author of Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution, many of his diabetic clients with cataracts have improved their eyesight simply by eating a low-c Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

You may have these symptoms when your blood sugar has dropped below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). When you have had diabetes for many years, you may not always develop symptoms of mild low blood sugar. Some young children with diabetes cannot recognize symptoms of low blood sugar. Others can, but not every time. To be safe, the parents need to do a home blood sugar test whenever they suspect low blood sugar in a child. Symptoms may include: Sweating (almost always present). Check for sweating on the back of your neck at your hairline. Nervousness, shakiness, and weakness. A fast heartbeat and feeling anxious. These symptoms may go away shortly after you eat food that contains sugar. If your blood sugar continues to drop (below 40 mg/dL), your behavior may change. Symptoms may include: Inability to concentrate. Confusion and irritability. Slurred speech. Unsteadiness when standing or walking. Personality changes, such as anger or crying. Symptoms of severe low blood sugar (usually below 20 mg/dL) include: If your blood sugar drops while you are sleeping, your partner or other family members may notice that you are sweating and behaving differently. Signs of low blood sugar at night (nocturnal hypoglycemia) include: Restlessness. Making unusual noises. Attempting to get out of bed or accidentally rolling out of bed. Sweating. You may wake up with a headache in the morning if your blood sugar was low during the night. Some people have no symptoms of low blood sugar. The only symptom you may have is confusion. Or you may become unconscious before anyone realizes you have low blood sugar. You may have hypoglycemic unawareness if you: Cannot tell by your symptoms that your blood sugar is low. Have low blood sugar several times a week. Have type 1 diabetes, or have had Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like

In this article, we will explore what low blood sugar feels like for different people with diabetes. We will look at the symptoms, how they can change over time, and how they are often different from person to person. We will look at planning ahead, and the treatment of hypoglycemia, hereafter referred to as “low blood sugar.” To get started, patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes were interviewed and asked the question: What is it like and what do you do when life hands you the low blood sugar agenda for the day? Describe your experience. Melissa’s story Melissa is usually gung-ho and ready to go for the day, but when she is handed the low blood sugar agenda, it takes all the wind out of her “cells.” They feel wrinkled up and emaciate. Here is how Melissa describes her low blood sugars: I imagine you, (you wrinkly old emaciated cell with no food in you), as a grumpy old man. I scream at you, though I can’t move. No, I won’t take your stifling agenda! I have to work after all. My kids need me to take them to dance class after school. I’m reluctant to take your agenda, packed with the helplessness that is my poison pill of the day. If I believe those positive self-help type blogs, then I would know that to decide you are happy determines your destination for the day. If you have diabetes, that’s a crock. With diabetes, your low blood sugar determines your agenda, and ultimately what you will be able to do for the day. When it gets below 70, or dips severely low- it begs and screams to be addressed! Especially if it dips fast, then I’m in trouble. Every cell in my body screams out. If it’s too low, I can’t move to do anything about it! Often I get a little dizzy feeling, and then I know I have to treat. I will get the shakes so bad that I can’t Continue reading >>

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar: 7 Tricks Every Diabetic Should Know

What causes hypoglycemia? iStock/Erna Vader Taking certain diabetes medications, skipping meals, not consuming enough carbs, and even too much exercise can throw your blood sugar off balance and cause low blood sugar. Insomnia and excessive alcohol consumption have also been linked to low glucose levels. When blood sugar dips to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning—in most people, that's below 70 mg/dl—it results in a hypo attack with varying symptoms depending on its severity. People who have recurring bouts of low blood sugar may have no warning signs at all, explains Michael Bergman, MD, endocrinologist and clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness; the longer you’ve had diabetes, the more common it is. On the milder end of the low blood sugar spectrum, you may feel hungry, nauseated, jittery, nervous, and have cold and clammy-feeling skin. Many people also describe the feeling that their heart is racing or pounding. Low blood sugar can happen at night, too, causing nightmares and night sweats. Moderate low blood sugar can cause behavioral changes, making you fearful, confused, or angry. It can also trigger blurry vision, slurred speech, and problems with balance and walking. A layperson may even mistake you for being drunk. If left untreated, severe low blood sugar can cause loss of consciousness, seizures, irreversible brain or heart damage, coma, or even death. Here are first aid tips to handle a diabetic emergency. iStock/Geber86 It goes like this: If your blood sugar reading is low (below 70 mg/dl), eat or drink something equal to 15 grams of fast-acting carbohydrate (4 ounces of juice). Even if you feel okay, don't wait for the symptoms of hypoglycemia to kick in. Rest for 15 mi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

A A A Do I need to follow-up with my doctor after being diagnosed with diabetic eye disease? Diabetes is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. Diabetic eye disease also encompasses a wide range of other eye problems, for example, Diabetes may cause a reversible, temporary blurring of the vision, or it can cause a severe, permanent loss of vision. Some people may not even realize they have had diabetes for several years until they begin to experience problems with their eyes or vision. Diabetes also may result in heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and circulatory abnormalities of the legs. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million people additional people went undiagnosed. (This population is unaware that they have diabetes.) In the United States 1.2 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. In the US in 2012, the total annual cost of diagnosed diabetes was 2.45 billion. Eighty-six million people in the US have prediabetes, and 9 out of every 10 don't know they have it. Of the 86 million people with prediabetes, without lifestyle changes 15% to 30% of them will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lifestyle management has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by at least two-thirds. It can also slow or halt the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. People can try to avoid the problems associated with diabetes, including those that affect the eyes, by taking appropriate care of themselves by the following: Maintain a normal level of weight Watch your diet, especially limiting unhealthy types of fats and Continue reading >>

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A Low Blood Sugar Feels Like.

Across the board, a low blood sugar seems to be considered as anything under 70 mg/dL. Revisiting the American Diabetes Association’s website this morning offers up a list of symptoms of low blood sugar, like: Shakiness Nervousness or anxiety Sweating, chills and clamminess Irritability or impatience Confusion, including delirium Rapid/fast heartbeat Lightheadedness or dizziness Hunger and nausea Sleepiness Blurred/impaired vision Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue Headaches Weakness or fatigue Anger, stubbornness, or sadness Lack of coordination Nightmares or crying out during sleep Seizures Unconsciousness (As with most diabetes-related lists on the Internet, the further down the list you read, the worse shit seems to get.) The “what happens if a low blood sugar goes untreated” answer is short, and to the point: “If left untreated, hypoglycemia may lead to a seizure or unconsciousness (passing out, a coma). In this case, someone else must take over.” When my daughter hears my Dexcom beeping, she understands the difference between the alert signaling a high blood sugar and the alert signaling a low. If the high alarm goes off, she doesn’t react, but if the low alarm goes off, she perks up immediately and asks me if I need a “glupose tab.” The immediacy and seriousness of low blood sugars is noticed by my three year old because she’s seen me go from normal, functional Mom to confused, sweaty, and tangled-in-my-own-words Mom in a matter of minutes. The symptoms of low blood sugars don’t just vary from PWD to PWD, but often vary within the PWD’s own lifetime. When I was very small, my low blood sugar “tell” was when my mouth would go numb and my face felt like I’d had Novocaine hours earlier and it was just starting to wear off, with th Continue reading >>

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