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Kodo Millet Diabetes

Baajara Traditional Food Products

Baajara Traditional Food Products

Kodo Millet is a survivor. Slender and green, its appearance belies its toughness. It flourishes in drought prone regions and poor soil conditions Kodo Millet is rampant and wild in West Africa where it originated and is widely known as a "famine food". It has sown its seeds across the planet and is now found in many far flung places, from Hawaii to South East Asia and India. A quick grow, it takes four months until it is harvested, but is a health fix for life. Kodo is the variation of millet grains that contain more probiotic elements. Probiotic helps for proper blood circulation, improve immune power, increase right bone density, let us to keep healthy in the stage of hormonal changes when the body needs and help for good weight control. amaranth Kodo Millet has long been used in ancient medicinal practices to reduce sugar levels and stave off the onset of diabetes. Kodo Millet is a natural source of Quercetin, a flavonol that prevents obesity. A high fibre and low oil content enhances nutrition, helps your body register when it needs to stop eating more efficiently, and maintains a healthy digestive system. Kodo Millet lowers your risk of developing hemorrhoids and stroke. A diet that includes Kodo Millets shows healthier post-meal glucose levels. It releases sugar into the blood stream at a slower pace, avoiding sharp spikes in blood sugar, while managing glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol. It also helps to boost immunity and fertility. Quercetin in Kodo Millets is a natural antihistamine that keeps your respiratory system functioning normally. Quercetin also helps to keep your blood pressure in check and balance out cortisol (which induces stress) levels in your body. High polyphenol content makes Kodo Millet rich in antioxidants. Polyphenols are micronutrie Continue reading >>

Special Programme For Promotion Of Millets In Tribal Areas

Special Programme For Promotion Of Millets In Tribal Areas

Pearl millet is the most widely grown type of millet and India is largest producer of pearl millet. Pearl millet is a rich source of phosphorus, which plays an important part in the structure of body cells. Consumption of pearl millets helps in minimizing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Being a good source of magnesium, millets act as a cofactor in a number of enzymatic reactions. Also known as African finger millet, red millet, ragi and very popular millet specially in Southern India. It is rich in calcium and protein and also have good amount of iron and other minerals. Ragi tops in antioxidant activity among common Indian foods, Ragi also has some good number of Essential Amino Acids (EAA) which are essential for human body. Foxtail millets are high in Iron content and these millets are totally pest-free. Foxtail not only not need any fumigants, but act as anti pest agents to store delicate pulses such as green gram. They also control blood sugar and cholesterol levels & increase HDL cholesterol. Kodo millets contain high amounts of polyphenols, an antioxidant compound, they also has high on fibre, low on fat. Kodo millet inhibited glycation and cross-linking of collagen. Kodo millets are good for diabetes. Little Millets seeds are smaller than other millets, like foxtail millet, little millet also high in Iron content, high in fibre like Kodo and has high antioxidant activity. It helps in diabetes and diseases related stomach. Barnyard millets are high in fibre content, phosporous and calcium. Bardyard has low glycemic index and thus helps in type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease with regular intake of this millet. Sorghum is another one of the ancient cereal grain, and grown mostly for their fodder value. Sorghum has high nutritional value, with high levels of unsa Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Granoss Kodo Millet - Diabetic Food International Pvt. Ltd.

Granoss Kodo Millet - Diabetic Food International Pvt. Ltd.

Foxtail Millet Semolina is rich in dietary fiber, protein & low in fat. Since it does not... The seed of Little Millet are smaller than those of common millet. It is generally consumed as rice... Millet are very nutritious and considered to be one of the most digestible and non-allergenic grains available today. Millets are nonacid forming foods, thus making them soothing and easily digestible. They are veritable storehouse of health. These nutria- grains are so versatile in their culinary properties that any recipe made of other cereals can be made with millets. The minimum purchase order quantity for the product is 1 Millet are very nutritious and considered to be one of the most digestible and non-allergenic grains available today. Millets are nonacid forming foods, thus making them soothing and easily digestible. They are veritable storehouse of health. These nutria- grains are so versatile in their culinary properties that any recipe made of other cereals can be made with millets. Kodo Millet is a 3000 year old grain. The fiber content of the whole grain is very high. Kodo Millet has around 9.8% protein and the nutritional value of the protein has been found to be better than rice. As with other food grains, the nutritive value of Kodo Millet could be improved by supplementation with legume protein. KODO MILLET SHOWED HIGHEST PHENOLIC CONTENT At the Memorial University of Newfoundland in Canada, a team of biochemists analyzed the antioxidant activity and phenolic content of several varieties of millet: kodo, finger, foxtail, proso, pearl, and little millets. Kodo millet showed the highest phenolic content. All varieties showed high antioxidant activity, in both soluble and bound fractions. All values except protein are expressed on a dry weight basis Source: Hulse Continue reading >>

Eating Millets Only For Six Months Will Cure Diabetes According To Dr.khader In One Of Tv Channels.anybody Has Tried This.

Eating Millets Only For Six Months Will Cure Diabetes According To Dr.khader In One Of Tv Channels.anybody Has Tried This.

eating millets only for six months will cure diabetes according to DR.KHADER in one of TV channels.anybody has tried this. now many people are going only for millets and completely stopped wheat and rice.members opinion please. Just a swift look at the relative carbohydrate (AKA GLUCOSE) content of three cereals: It is not just carbs but the fiber that helps delay the release of glucose. Kodo Millet which is recommended for diabetes has nearly 14% fiber. I know a guy who was asked to start Insulin is no longer taking tablets. He eats nothing but millets and jogs everyday. Lost a lot of weight and his HBA1C is in the range of 5. Glycemic indices of some of the siridhanyas Ragi (Eleusine coracana) 104 13 (but in some preparations it can come down to 70) some varietis of rice: Brown rice with an average score of 50 and parboiled rice with an average score of 38. I have tried eating Millets for 2 staright years as ragi balls morning for breakfast and dinner, no cure for me, though it didnt affect my sugar number drastically and was on par with chaptathis Some of the ragi preparations have a GI of 100 plus- more than that of pure glucose itself! navinsinha ji something funny with me....the day I eat Bajra roti for dinner....my PPBS shoots up... but FBS net morning is better. For diabetics he recommends foxtail, banyard, little and browntop millet. Not ragi, wheat rice and sugar. These grains are indeed tasty and ar3 definately worth trying. One has to completely avoid sugar and walk for one hour everyday. I am on a cereal free diet it helps very much to keep the glucose levels down. Glycemic indices of these. Bajra is lower but not as mucah as parboiled rice which 38. Just cool like rice and add rasam or camber to it. If you hit the net you will get lot of receipies. Yes ev Continue reading >>

Kodo Millet Rice - An Alternate Food For Gd

Kodo Millet Rice - An Alternate Food For Gd

There have been many a diet plan suggested for those having Gestational Diabetes. Apart from rotis & oats, I have found organic 'Kodo Millet Rice' as an excellent supplement for rice eaters. It looks like broken wheat (dhaliya) & when cooked tastes like rice and you can have it with anything. You get the white (without husk) & brown(with husk) versions in organic stores only. Being low on glycemic index acts very well on controlling sugar levels. I have GD, on a 1800kcal diet and was asked to walk for 15-20 min after every meal. After having 2/3 phulkas with sabji at night and 20 min walk,my sugar levels after 2 hrs was at 130-135. Since the time I started having millet rice even if I skip walking at times my sugar levels never went up beyond 105-110. Am in my 36wks and my doc who initially suggested that I shud be prepared for an early csec by 37wks, now based on my scan & reports is happy to wait full term. If you are in chennai- Fresh outlets have it as' Healthy choice product - Varagu Millet (white)' In Bangalore - Buffalo back in Jayanagar (or) Organic Options (near chinmaya mission school,koramangala has the brown one. Continue reading >>

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

Food, an energy reservoir often becomes a hurdle for people living with diabetes who have to consciously eat the right food to keep their blood sugar in check. Refined carbohydrate or sugar rich foods such as Bread, Donuts and tetra pack juices act as culprits whereas fibre and protein rich foods such as whole grains, pulses, oats, barley , millets, nuts , milk, raw veggies and fruits act as saviours. There are studies been done globally to find balanced diet, that can be recommended for diabetics, which is not only tasty but also gives energy boost. One such study reveals, Millets which are natural source of fibre, protein, calcium, magnesium, help control the blood sugar spike. Just replacing refined grains with these tiny but mighty Millets, open a whole new array of diet options for people living with diabetes. Pearl Millet (Bajra), Finger Millet (Ragi), Sorghum (Jowar), Little Millet (Varai, Sanwa) are millets that are easily available locally. Each of them supplements the diet with minerals, fibres, proteins and phytochemicals - the combination of which helps beat diabetes. Besides these nutrients, a non-nutrient yet beneficial component of millet is the fibre in it. Fibre is an indigestible part of food and helps in slow release of sugar into the blood after the breakdown of food, along with improving of insulin sensitivity ie, your body cells respond to the insulin and in turn use up the sugar released into the blood, thereby controlling blood sugar levels. Similar to fibre, proteins also help in controlled and slow release of sugar into the blood. Millets being a rich source of protein and fibre handle the sugar load in body more efficiently. Phytochemicals, found in the bran layers of millet are the non nutrient component commonly found in plant based food. It Continue reading >>

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Dietary Interventions For Type 2 Diabetes: How Millet Comes To Help

Go to: Type 2 Diabetes Overview and Associated Complications Diabetes is a chronic disease that is characterized by high level of blood glucose also known as hyperglycaemia. According to WHO 2015 published figure1, 9% of the world population aged 18 and above has contracted diabetes and an estimated 1.5 million deaths per year are attributed to diabetes directly. It is well known that glucose level of a diabetic patient increases dramatically beyond the normal range after a meal. It is also true that their blood glucose level would soon drop as the body failed to store the excess glucose for later use. Diabetes is classified into Types 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes is also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes as the patients’ pancreas cannot produce or produces little insulin and often presents itself from childhood (Diabetes.co.uk, 2016c). Type 2 diabetes (T2D), however, often first appears in adults when the body becomes resistant to insulin or fails to make sufficient amounts of insulin (Martin et al., 1992; Weyer et al., 2001). T2D comprises 90% of people with diabetes around the world (NHS choice, 2014). This can largely be the result of excess body weight and physical inactivity. Added complication to T2D is that it presents less marked symptoms than Type 1 diabetes and is often diagnosed only when complications have already arisen. Major complications caused by hyperglycaemia include atherosclerosis that hardens and narrows the blood vessels. Other diabetes-related complications are heart disease, stroke, retinopathy, and kidney failure (Bitzur et al., 2009; Sone et al., 2011). Diabetic retinopathy leads to blindness by causing cumulative damage to the small blood vessels in the retina and contributes to 1% blindness globally. Similarly, kidney f Continue reading >>

Barnyard Millet Idli | Diabetic Friendly Recipe

Barnyard Millet Idli | Diabetic Friendly Recipe

Millets, tiny cereals of goodness has been in my food life since a year. I tried to cook them in most amazing and delicious form of breakfast and was super successful. My most staple food of the morning=> dosa, idli, upma, pongal can even incorporate these grains which makes me more than happy. (Warm welcome to Barnyard millet idli !!). But what disappoints me is lack of availability of millets in most supermarkets of UAE. For me, I have to drive to the grocery shop which is bit out of the way and sometimes I end up to see “Out of Stock” board hanging at the millet counter there. So on some full moon day with best chance of luck, my trip to grocery shop ends happily with loads millet packets of all kind. I would be happy like a kid holding some unusual, rare chocolate in it’s hand. For those of you who live in India, buying millets isn’t going to be difficult. It’s likely to be available in most grocery shops and super markets. Ease of access to most favorite groceries is what makes our cooking life simple and straight forward. Otherwise the food love and cooking interest takes back seat. Barnyard millet idli has everything basic like it’s counterpart. Lentils, fenugreek seeds and millet (as a replacement to rice). The key step in making really soft idli is grinding the lentils to perfection. When you grind the pre-soaked black gram lentils the batter should be airy, fluffy and light. Not runny!! When rice is being replaced by millets in breakfast like this dosa and idli, it becomes diabetic friendly. So all members of the family under a roof can share and enjoy the same food with same love and affection. Food really connects family and roots become strong and solid. Soak split black gram lentils and fenugreek seeds together in enough water for about 3 hours Continue reading >>

Proso Millet - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Proso Millet - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Proso millet is an annual herbaceous plant in the genera Panicum, and it has a chromosome number of 2n = 36 with basic chromosome number of x = 9. Hari D. Upadhyaya, ... Shailesh Kumar Singh, in Genetic and Genomic Resources for Grain Cereals Improvement , 2016 Proso, barnyard, little, and kodo millets belong to the group called small millets, sometimes also referred to as minor millets. Proso millet (Panicum miliaceumL.) is commonly known as broomcorn millet, common millet, hog millet, Russian millet, and so on, in different parts of the world. Barnyard millet is generally well-known as Japanese barnyard millet (Echinochloa crus-galli(L.) P. Beauv.), Indian barnyard millet (Echinochloa colona(L.) Link), cockspur grass, Korean native millet, prickly millet, sawa millet, watergrass, and so on. Kodo millet (Paspalum scrobiculatumL.) is also known by different names in different languages in India (kodo in Hindi, khoddi in Urdu, arugu in Telugu, varagu in Tamil), African bastard millet grass, arika, haraka, ditch millet in New Zealand, and mandal in Pakistan. Similarly, little millet (Panicum sumatrenseRoth. ex. Roem. & Schult.) is also commonly known as samai, gindi, mutaki, kutki, and so on, in different Indian languages. These crops are cultivated in the marginal areas, and are adapted to a wide range of growing environments. Proso millet is currently grown in Asia, Australia, North America, Europe, and Africa (Rajput etal.,2014), and used for feeding birds and as livestock feed in the developed countries and for food in some parts of Asia. Barnyard millet is mainly grown in India, China, Japan, and Korea for human consumption as well as fodder (Upadhyaya etal.,2014). Kodo and little millets are largely cultivated throughout India by tribal people in small areas. All t Continue reading >>

'kodo Millet Helps Keep Diabetes Under Check'

'kodo Millet Helps Keep Diabetes Under Check'

'Kodo millet helps keep diabetes under check' 'Kodo millet helps keep diabetes under check' Kodo millet (kodri), the wild cereal, has medicinal properties that can help diabetics and even the obese. VADODARA: Kodo millet (kodri), the wild cereal , has medicinal properties that can help diabetics and even the obese. Research by professor M Daniel, former head of M S University's botany department, has revealed kodri, which yields white-husked grain, has a number of medicinal properties (including anti-diabetic and anti-rheumatic attributes), helps heal wounds and has a tranquilizing effect. Kodri, which is cooked as rice, is cultivated in many countries for its grain and for fodder. In India, it is largely grown in parts of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh , Andhra Pradesh , Tamil Nadu , Odisha and Bihar. "Since ancient times kodri is consumed as a food by diabetic patients, since traditionally it was believed it reduces sugar level," professor Daniel, who initiated the study at MSU and completed it at Dr Daniel's Laboratory, told TOI. "Recent experiments proved aqueous and ethanolic extracts of this grain produced a dose-dependent fall in fasting blood glucose (FBG) and a significant increase in serum insulin level. But the compounds responsible for reduction of sugar level were not known so far." Through the research, the professor has isolated five anti-diabetic compounds quercetin (the major one), ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid and syringic acid from kodri and one chemical (quercetin) that prevents obesity. "The alcoholic extract of kodri, which is responsible for the anti-diabetic property, is found to possess anti-diabetic compounds such as quercetin (a flavonol) and phenolic acids like vanillic acid, syringic acid, cis-ferulic acid, p-hydr Continue reading >>

About Millets | Kaulige Foods - Bengaluru's Millet Hub

About Millets | Kaulige Foods - Bengaluru's Millet Hub

Millets are traditional grains, grown and eaten in in the indian subcontinent for at least the past 5000 years. They are rain-fed, hardy grains which have low requirements of water and fertility when compared to other popular cereals. Millets can be split into two broad categories: Naked grains and Husked grains. Naked grains are the three popular millets (Ragi, Jowar and Bajra) which dont have a hard, undigestable husk. These millets dont need to be processed after harvest they just need to be cleaned and can be used. Because of this reason, they are still popular in our country and are widely cultivated (they are also called major millets because of this reason). Husked grains are the other millets, like Foxtail Millet (navane), Little Millet (saame) and Kodo Millet (haarka), which have an undigestable seed coat. This husk needs to be removed before the grain is fit for human consumption. This used to be done by hand in the centuries past and so was rice. However, the mechanization of the processing of these minor millets did not keep pace with rice and other cereals so they soon became unpopular. Millets are highly nutritious, rich in fibre and gluten-free, making them easy for the body to absorb. They are rich in a huge spectrum of micronutrients, including calcium, iron, phosphorus, etc. They are slow digesting foods which dont cause the huge spike in blood sugar which is caused by eating polished rice, therefore, millets help with preventing and controlling diabetes. Click here for the nutrient composition of millets as compared to wheat and rice. Millets should ideally be an integral part of your daily diet. They add variety and balance to your food. They can replace white rice in all your meals. You can start by mixing millets into rice and slowly make one meal Continue reading >>

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millets in ones diet can help prevent diabetes, says Dr. Vijay Viswanathan. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Prolonged exposure to diabetes damages important organs like the eye, the kidney, the heart and nerves, as the result of damage to small blood vessels. Heredity, obesity, stress, rich diet, and lack of physical activity are some of the causes for diabetes. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problems. Physical activity/exercise helps the muscles convert glucose to energy. But there is a risk of developing hypoglycemia. Shifting to a healthy diet and a brisk walk of more than five hours a week helps keep blood glucose level normal. As far as diet is concerned, millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet (Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil: Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi: Bajra, Tamil: Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi: Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua; Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets ar Continue reading >>

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

> Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India It might be a major aspect of cultural identity, but the consumption of white rice and other refined grains has led to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in South India. However, diabetes specialists in Bangalore along with dieticians and diabetes educators are digging deep into the rich heritage of millet cuisine of Karnataka to address the issue of a proper food for diabetics. Remember your grandparents and why they had no chronic illnesses or non-communicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)? Apart from the fact that they did not face urbanization, and there was no rampant use of fertilizers and pesticides, the diet they had was diverse. To begin with, most of these people did not consume the varieties of rice we now consume and that rice was not polished. The food they consumed was diverse even though they used to consume local produce and never heard of blueberries, hazelnuts, or the Noni juice of Tahiti. Their diet was full of seasonal vegetables and fruits, lentils, rice, wheat, and of course generous amounts of millets. They used palm jaggery and used sugar sparingly as a treat only during festivals. As the demand for higher agricultural outputs increased, the use of fertilizers and pesticides increased. Moreover, the perceptions of people regarding food changed. Rice was considered as a better food when compared to millets. With the arrival of newer varieties of rice and the increase in its consumption, more and more people fell prey to diabetes. Now, neither our love for rice nor its consumption has reduced. Why does rice consumption increase the risk of diabetes? Many studies and researches have time and aga Continue reading >>

5 Millets Health Benefits & Their Role In Weight Loss

5 Millets Health Benefits & Their Role In Weight Loss

Millet Types | Benefits | Recipes | Side Effects Millets are a group of small seed grasses grown in semi-dry areas of Asia and Africa. Millets have been widely cultivated as cereal crops or as fodder for animals. Because milletshave a short growing season, can withstand dry and high-temperature conditions yet yield well, they are popularly grown in the developing nations. In the developed nations, millets have been relegated to be used as bird feed.However, millets in India are enjoying rising popularity due to a variety of health benefits of millets. They are gluten-free grains and hence it can be consumed by everyone. We will elucidate on the types of millets. Dont know what foods can help you in weight loss as well as keeping up with your health? Know from our expert Nutritionists. Click here to book an appointment. The first consultation is totally FREE! Millets in India enjoy prime importance that is because India is one of the biggest producers clocking 8 million tonnes every year followed by Africa and China [ 2 ]. So let us know a bit more about the types of millets grown in India and millet nutrition that will convince you to stock them. [ 3 ] Sorghum or jowar is one of the most popular millets for weight loss The very mention of millets and you would have picturized jowar or jowar rotis in your mind. Well, it is one of the most popular, much-researched millet for weight loss . Due to jowar roti benefits, many grandmas prefer it over regular wheat rotis. Compared to rice and wheat, jowar has a high proportion of calcium. It also packs in a neat iron, protein, and fibre punch. Researchers have found that a typical sorghum wax is rich in policosanols which helps in reducing the levels of cholesterol. Being a gluten-free grain, it is also much preferred by those Continue reading >>

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