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Is Sucrose Bad For Diabetics

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Artificial Sweeteners And Diabetes

Is it possible to eat sweets when you have diabetes? The answer is "yes." But when you’re trying to satisfy your sweet tooth, it can be hard to know what to reach for at the grocery store (sugar-free this or low-calorie that). So, use this primer to help you choose wisely. The Sweet Facts When you’re comparing sweeteners, keep these things in mind: Sugars are naturally occurring carbohydrates. These include brown sugar, cane sugar, confectioners’ sugar, fructose, honey, and molasses. They have calories and raise your blood glucose levels (the level of sugar in your blood). Reduced-calorie sweeteners are sugar alcohols. You might know these by names like isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, and xylitol. You'll often find them in sugar-free candy and gum. They have about half the calories of sugars and can raise your blood sugar levels, although not as much as other carbohydrates. Artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods." They were designed in a lab, have no calories, and do not raise your blood sugar levels. Types of Artificial Sweeteners Artificial low-calorie sweeteners include: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low, Sugar Twin). You can use it in both hot and cold foods. Avoid this sweetener if you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal). You can use it in both cold and warm foods. It may lose some sweetness at high temperatures. People who have a condition called phenylketonuria should avoid this sweetener. Acesulfame potassium or ace-K (Sweet One, Swiss Sweet, Sunett). You can use it in both cold and hot foods, including in baking and cooking. Sucralose (Splenda). You can use it in hot and cold foods, including in baking and cooking. Processed foods often contain it. Advantame can be used in baked goods, soft drinks and other non-alcoholic bev Continue reading >>

Does Sucrose Increase The Sugar Level?

Does Sucrose Increase The Sugar Level?

Your blood sugar levels vary throughout the day in response to the foods you eat, your physical activity level, your stress and even your hormones. Many of these factors can interact to increase your blood sugar levels; regularly monitoring your blood sugars with a glucometer can help you better understand how your body works. Although foods can affect different people differently, grains, flours and sugars increase blood sugar levels in almost everyone. Sucrose is a type of sugar that can elevate your blood sugar levels in the minutes and hours following its consumption. Sucrose in Foods The main source of sucrose in your diet is table sugar, as well as most sweetened foods and beverages. For example, white sugar, brown sugar and maple syrup are mainly made of sucrose, which means that any foods sweetened with these sugars will also be high in sucrose, such as cakes, cookies, fruit punches, muffins, pancakes and granola bars. Although much of the sugar naturally found in fruits is in the form of free fructose, some fruits, including melons, peaches, pineapples, oranges and dates, also provide significant amounts of sucrose, albeit less than sugary foods. Avoid sucrose and sucrose-containing foods, with the exception of fruits, to prevent your blood sugar levels from increasing dramatically after your meals. Sucrose Sucrose is a type of sugar called a disaccharide. Disaccharide means that it is a carbohydrate made from two molecules of sugar. In the case of sucrose, the two molecules are glucose and fructose. Another common disaccharide in your diet is lactose, which is made of a molecule of glucose attached to a molecule of galactose. When you eat sucrose, it is easily broken down by digestive enzymes in your digestive system into single molecules of glucose and fructo Continue reading >>

Fructose And Diabetes

Fructose And Diabetes

As part of the overall diabetes discussion, there lurks the misconception that somehow fructose does not contribute to diabetes. This is a major misunderstanding. Fructose is directly associated with diabetes, especially high-fructose corn syrup. When one is cellularly addicted to glucose, sucrose, and/or fructose, they become stuck in sugar metabolism for making energy. For years, limited and conventional “wisdom” has held that fructose does not affect your blood sugar. This is accurate on a superficial level but unscientific in its assumption that because fructose does not raise blood sugar, it does not affect insulin resistance and cause many metabolic disease problems from the metabolic abnormalities associated with metabolizing an excess amount of fructose. It is therefore falsely deemed a safer sugar than glucose. None of this has been proven to be true. A primary difference is that fructose is metabolized differently than glucose. Fructose is metabolized much more rapidly than any other sugar into fat via the liver. It is also primarily metabolized in the liver. Because of this it has also been associated with a high level of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and a rapid accumulation of a particular kind of fat (triglycerides) that is stored in both the liver and general fat tissue. This is related not only to NAFLD but also to heart disease and hypertension. Glucose, when combined with fructose (as in sucrose and high-fructose corn syrup), accelerates fructose absorption. These metabolic differences are further enhanced in light of recent research reported in the March 2011 Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, which found that cortical areas around hypothalamus in the brain responded differently to fructose than to glucose. They found that in brain scans Continue reading >>

Fructose: Good Or Bad For Diabetes? - Dlife

Fructose: Good Or Bad For Diabetes? - Dlife

Long thought to be the better sugar for people with diabetes, fructose may not be so great after all. Most people think of fructose as a natural fruit sugar. After all, its one of the main sugars (along with glucose and sucrose) in fruits. In fact, the amount of fructose in most fruits is relatively small, compared with other sources. Fruit also contains a host of greatnutrients, including fiber, which slows the absorption of sugars. The fructose found in processed foods, however, is another story. Between 1980 and 2000, Americans decreased their intake of sucrose (table sugar), but the amount of fructose consumption more than tripled. The reason for this was that food makers replaced sucrose (table sugar) with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) to sweeten foods and beverages. HFCS does not come from fruit. Its a highly processedblend of sugars (typically 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose) derived from corn. Because the fructose in HFCS is part of a man-made blend (as opposed to the natural compound of sugars found in fruit), the body metabolizes it very differently from other sugars. Also, people with diabetes were told that because fructose doesnt raise blood glucose levels, it was a good alternative to sugar. Therefore, they began using fructose-rich agave nectar under the mistaken assumption that itposed no diabetes-related risk. Unlike glucose, which enters the bloodstream and raises blood sugar levels, fructose is taken up directly to the liver. Sugar and honey contain about 50percentglucose and 50 percentfructose, so regardless of which is consumed, blood glucose will rise. By contrast, agave nectar contains about 85percentfructose, on average, so it has less of an impact on blood sugar and is considered a low glycemic sweetener. However, high fructose int Continue reading >>

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

In order to manage their condition, people with diabetes need to monitor their sugar intake. A good way of doing this might be by choosing a natural sweetener option. One of the more popular choices is coconut palm sugar. In this article, we look at the effect coconut palm sugar has on blood sugar (glucose) levels and whether it may be healthful for people with diabetes. Contents of this article: What is diabetes? People with diabetes have bodies that do not produce enough insulin or use insulin correctly. Insulin is the hormone needed to help the body to normalize blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are a measurement of the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. Most foods contain sugar. The body stores the sugar and transports it through the bloodstream to the cells, which use it as energy. When insulin is not working properly, sugar cannot enter cells, and they are unable to produce as much energy. When the cells of the body cannot process sugar, diabetes occurs. What is coconut palm sugar? Coconut palm sugar is made from the sap of the coconut palm. The sugar is extracted from the palm by heating it until the moisture evaporates. After processing, the sugar has a caramel color and tastes like brown sugar, making it an easy substitution in any recipe. Coconut palm sugar is considered a healthier option for people with diabetes because it contains less pure fructose than other sweeteners. The digestive tract does not absorb fructose as it does other sugars, which means that the excess fructose finds its way to the liver. Too much fructose in the liver can lead to a host of metabolic problems, including type 2 diabetes. Can people with diabetes eat coconut palm sugar? While the American Diabetes Association (ADA) do find coconut palm sugar to be an acceptable sugar sub Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

Glucose And Sucrose For Diabetes.

Glucose And Sucrose For Diabetes.

Diabetes has been known since ancient times as a wasting disease in which sugar was lost in the urine, but more recently the name has been used to describe the presence of more than the normal amount of glucose in the blood, even in the absence of glucose in the urine. Some of the medical ideas regarding the original form of the condition have been applied to the newer form. Cultural "paradigms" or ideologies are so convenient that people often don't bother to doubt them, and they are sometimes so rigorously enforced that people learn to keep their doubts to themselves. Public concern about diabetes has been growing for decades, but despite the introduction of insulin and other drugs to treat it, and massive campaigns to"improve" eating habits, mortality from diabetes has been increasing during the last 100 years. Diabetes ("type 1") has been increasing even among children (Barat, et al., 2008). A basic meaning of homeopathic medicine is the support of the organism's ability to heal itself; the essence of allopathy is that the physician fights "a disease" to cure the patient, e.g., by cutting out tumors or killing germs. Confidence in the organism's essential rationality led the doctors with a homeopathic orientation to see a fever as part of a recuperative process, while their allopathic opponents sometimes saw fever as the essence of the sickness to be cured. Homeopaths concentrated on the nature of the patient; allopaths concentrated on a disease entity in itself, and were likely to ignore the patient's idiosyncrasies and preferences. Diabetes was named for the excessive urination it causes, and for the sugar in theurine. It was called the sugar disease, and physicians were taught that sugar was the problem. Patients were ordered to avoid sweet foods, and in hospita Continue reading >>

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

Sugars, Sugar Substitutes And Sweeteners: Natural And Artificial

If you’re living with diabetes, or even if you’re not, you might think sweet foods are a barrier to your healthy, balanced diet. As a general rule,everyone should be eating less sugar– but sometimes, only something sweet will do. If want to lose weight, or you’re trying to keep your blood glucose levels stable, you may want to know whether artificial sweeteners could help. If you browse around your local supermarket, you’ll see a huge range of sweeteners on offer, so it can be baffling to know which, if any, to go for. So in this section we'll take you through: Sweeteners are ingredients that are added to food to enhance sweetness. They can be grouped in different ways: One way is to loosely group sweeteners as: sugar or sugar substitutes.Another way to group sweeteners is whether the sweetener is: natural or artificial. One of the most useful ways of grouping sweeteners is to look at those that have nutritive value, ie nutritive sweeteners, and those without nutritive value, ie non-nutritive or ‘low-calorie’ sweeteners. Nutritive sweeteners There are different types of nutritive sweeteners, but they all contain carbohydrate and provide calories. They are usually referred to as ‘sugars’ or ‘added sugar’, but they can also appear in the ingredient list of food packaging as: glucose fructose sucrose maltose honey and syrup, etc. Polyols One group of nutritive sweeteners is polyols, which are sugar alcohols, and include: erythritol isomalt maltitol mannitol sorbitol xylitol. They can be natural or artificially produced. Polyols contain carbohydrates and calories, but they have fewer calories and less of an effect on blood glucose levels than sucrose (sugar). Polyols and diabetes It’s not exactly clear how the polyols should be ‘counted’ by peopl Continue reading >>

Good Sugar Vs. Bad Sugar

Good Sugar Vs. Bad Sugar

Not all sugar is bad. Your body needs a type of sugar known as glucose in order to function properly. That being said, you also can’t overdo it, which is what a lot of people do. There are also some sugars that are better for you, or at least less damaging, than others. Understanding what constitutes good sugar from bad will help you prevent weight gain and disease while keeping your diet manageable and your body that much fitter. Sugar 101 First off, when a doctor or scientist refers to sugar, they aren’t necessarily talking about table sugar. Glucose is an essential part of our diets and a natural part of many foods that contain carbohydrates. Things like pasta, rice and bread have lots of carbs and nearly 100% of those carbohydrates are turned into glucose by our body. When glucose enters your body, insulin travels through your bloodstream to use it properly. This keeps energy flowing to all your body. Maintaining proper Insulin Efficiency keeps your body utilizing energy more than storing it as fat, keeps your cardiovascular system healthy and more. Sucrose: glucose and fructose Table sugar, or sucrose, is made of half glucose. The other half is made of fructose, which you may know from all the press surrounding the use of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). When you eat too much sugar, it’s not the glucose that is causing trouble in your cardiovascular and digestive systems; it’s the fructose. If there’s a “bad” sugar, this is it. Take note, though. High-fructose corn syrup is bad for you, but it only contains 5% more fructose than normal table sugar. This means if you’re substituting real sugar for HFCS, you’re only decreasing your fructose intake by a very small amount. Table sugar may be slightly technically better, but it’s still bad for you. T Continue reading >>

Sucrose In The Diet Of Diabetic Patients--just Another Carbohydrate?

Sucrose In The Diet Of Diabetic Patients--just Another Carbohydrate?

Sucrose in the diet of diabetic patients--just another carbohydrate? Peterson DB , Lambert J , Gerring S , Darling P , Carter RD , Jelfs R , Mann JI . The effects of regularly eating sucrose were studied in 23 diabetic patients, 12 Type 1 (insulin-dependent) and 11 Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent), with differing degrees of glycaemic control. Two diets, each lasting 6 weeks, were compared in a randomised cross-over study. Both diets were high in fibre and low in fat. In one diet 45 g of complex carbohydrate was replaced by 45 g of sucrose taken at mealtimes. There were no significant biochemical differences between the two diets in either Type 1 or Type 2 patients. In Type 1 patients the mean (+/- SEM) fasting plasma glucose was 10.5 (1.8)mmol/l on the control diet and 10.3 (1.5) mmol/l on sucrose. In Type 2 patients the levels were 9.1 (0.8) mmol/l and 8.9 (0.8) mmol/l respectively. Glycosylated haemoglobin for the Type 1 patients was 9.9% on control and 10.3% on sucrose; for Type 2 patients the figures were 9.3% and 9.0% respectively. There were no differences in mean daily plasma glucose levels or diurnal glucose profiles. Cholesterol (total and in lipoprotein fractions) was unchanged, as were diurnal triglyceride profiles and plasma insulin profiles in the Type 2 patients. There were no changes in medication or body weight. We conclude that a moderate amount of sucrose taken daily at mealtimes does not cause deterioration in metabolic control in diabetic patients following a high fibre/low fat diet. Continue reading >>

Switching From Sucrose To Fructose Lowers Insulin And Blood Glucose In The Obese And Diabetics

Switching From Sucrose To Fructose Lowers Insulin And Blood Glucose In The Obese And Diabetics

Switching from sucrose to fructose lowers insulin and blood glucose in the obese and diabetics Blood glucose and insulin levels were lower after consuming food or drink that contained fructose, compared to those with sucrose or glucose. By Gary Scattergood Swapping table sugar for fruit-derived sugar helpsreduce blood glucose, especially in people who are overweight or have diabetes, a new review has reported. Researchers from theUniversity of Canberra'sHealth Research Institute examined the short-term and long-term effects of swapping sucrose or glucose, for fructose, the sugar found in many fruits, vegetables and honey. The research, which has been published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,found blood glucose and insulin levels were lower after consuming food or drink that contained fructose, compared to those with sucrose or glucose. The authors wrote: "We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and clinicaltrials.gov. We included randomised controlled trials measuring peak postprandial glycemia after isoenergetic replacement of glucose, sucrose, or both with fructose in healthy adults or children with or without diabetes. The main outcomes analyzed were peak postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations." University of Canberra adjunct professional associate and senior author of the report Dr Kerry Mills said that in the short-term study, the reduction in blood glucose was far greater in people who were overweight or had diabetes than in those with normal blood glucose levels. The sharp rise in blood glucose after eating glucose and sucrose is a risk factor for diabetes. Fructose, on the other hand, has to be converted by the liver before it can affec Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The 4 Types Of Sugar - Progressivehealth.com

Diabetes And The 4 Types Of Sugar - Progressivehealth.com

If you have diabetes, sugar is a serious problem. However, some forms of sugar might be more dangerous than others. Learn about the 4 types of sugar and which is the most dangerous for diabetics below. Youve heard that sugar is sugar, but what if that is not quite true? There are four commonly-used kinds of sugar in the average Americans diet, and each one has a slightly different effect on the body. Find out how all of these sugars affect someone with diabetes, the healthiest sugar for your body, and how you can use this knowledge to counteract the effects of diabetes below. In todays modern diet, there are four main types of sugars commonly used as sweeteners. Many simple carbohydrates convert to sugar in the body (usually glucose or fructose), and nearly all sweet-tasting foods contain some form of sugar (usually fructose or sucrose). Learn more about these basic sugar types below: Glucose is actually the bodys preferred energy source. Glucose is your blood sugar and uses the enzymes glucokinase and hexokinase to boost the metabolism. Most carbohydrates from starches, grains, and vegetables convert to glucose in the blood to become energy or to stored in the liver for later use. In most cases, high glucose levels is what triggers high insulin production, which is why high blood glucose levels can be dangerous for diabetics, who either do not produce enough insulin or are resistant to insulin. Without a proper insulin balance, the sugar remains in the blood, which prevents it from being used as energy. This can create a variety of dangerous health problems. Some food labels call glucose dextrose, but it is basically the same form of sugar. This sugar is naturally found in fruits and vegetables. Of course, today, you are more likely to see this form of sugar as an add Continue reading >>

Fructose Not So Bad For Diabetes When Consumed In Moderation: Study

Fructose Not So Bad For Diabetes When Consumed In Moderation: Study

New research suggests fructose may not be so bad after all for diabetics — rather, it’s having too much of it that may wreak havoc. St. Michael’s Hospital researchers in Canada found that people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes actually experienced blood sugar control benefits when they consumed fructose, as well as a decrease in blood pressure, cholesterol, body weight and uric acid. These health benefits were similar to those that would be seen on medications, researchers noted. The Diabetes Care review included an analysis of 18 different studies that, in total, surveyed 209 people with diabetes with age groups ranging from teens to the elderly. While amounts and method of fructose intake ranged per study (whether it was just sprinkled onto their food, or incorporated in another way), all of the trials involved consuming fructose for anywhere from seven days to 12 weeks. “We’re seeing that there may be benefit if fructose wasn’t being consumed in such large amounts,” study researcher Adrian Cozma, a research assistant at St. Michael’s Hospital, said in a statement. “All negative attention on fructose-related harm draws further away from the issue of eating too many calories.” Fructose naturally occurs in honey, fruit and vegetables. Together with glucose, it makes table sugar (sucrose), researchers said. It’s also in high-fructose corn syrup. However, the results of this study refer only to pure fructose. It does not imply that our bodies react the same to fructose-containing table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup. In fact, a 2010 Princeton University study published in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior study showed that high-fructose corn syrup is associated with increased weight gain in mice compared with table sugar. And the Mayo Clini Continue reading >>

Is Sucrose Bad For You?

Is Sucrose Bad For You?

Sucrose naturally occurs in many fruits and veggies, but its also refined into granulated table sugar. Its virtually impossible to eat enough plant foods that natural sucrose could pose a health problem, but its quite easy to consume too much refined sucrose via baked goods, candy and desserts. Sucrose rapidly increases blood sugar levels, which triggers a series of events that can be bad for you, especially if youre diabetic. Sucrose is a disaccharide sugar comprised of one molecule of glucose and one molecule of fructose. Fructose is the main sugar in most fruits and sweet vegetables, although sucrose is also widely found in plants, particularly in pineapples, apricots, dates, sugar beets and some other root vegetables. Plants use sucrose, as well as starch, to store energy. Sucrose is refined mainly from sugarcane, but also from sugar beets, date palms and maple tree sap. Sucrose is much sweeter than starch or lactose, which is why its traditionally been used for making soda pop, candy, cakes, iced cream and other desserts. In more recent times, high fructose corn syrup has replaced the use of refined sucrose in many sweet beverages and foods because its even sweeter. Sucrose is rapidly broken down into glucose and absorbed into your bloodstream, which is good if you need a quick source of energy, but not good if you overdo it. A rapid rise in blood glucose levels triggers excess insulin release from your pancreas. The role of insulin is to shuttle glucose from your blood to cells where it can be burned to make energy. The main problems with releasing large amounts of insulin are that it overworks your pancreas and often takes too much glucose out of your blood, which leads to the infamous sugar crash. If not enough insulin is secreted, the high levels of glucose in Continue reading >>

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