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Is Fasting Blood Sugar Of 104 Normal

Blood Sugar 104 Mg/dl (5.77mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 104 Mg/dl (5.77mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesn’t work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctor’s instructions. It is conducted in the same manner as any laboratory blood test. The health professional will wrap an elastic band around the upper arm in order to restrict blood flow, which enlarges the veins and Continue reading >>

Question & Answer

Question & Answer

I’ve had a blood glucose test level of 104 in my last two blood workups. I know that it’s just over the upper limits of being safe and was wondering if that is a problem at this stage? What can I do to lower my blood sugar? I don’t want to get diabetes. Answer: Caroline Schreiber, M.D. A fasting blood glucose less than 100 is normal. 100-120 is called "impaired fasting glucose", or "pre-diabetes". A person with a fasting blood sugar over 120, or a non-fasting blood sugar over 200, is diabetic. Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) should be seen as a wake-up call. It is not a foregone conclusion that one with IFG will get diabetes, however, as diabetes is a progressive illness, one is likely to develop diabetes over time if lifestyle changes are not made. Primary risk factors for developing diabetes are family history, which one cannot control, and obesity. While not everyone with IFG is obese, most Americans could stand to eat better and lose some weight. With or without weight loss, exercise is key for bringing down blood sugar. Ideally, we would all exercise one hour every day. While that is impractical for most of us, we all need to be exercising more than we are. Someone with IFG should familiarize him or herself with a diabetic diet. Though not diabetic, it is still important to know which foods will elevate blood sugar, like carbohydrates, and limit those foods. None of this is news. Everyone knows that we should eat well and exercise, but implementing it takes a lot of discipline, especially in our culture of excess and sedentary living. Changes to diet must be sustainable, in other words not extreme, if they are to last a lifetime. Continue reading >>

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Questions And Answers - Blood Sugar

Use the chart below to help understand how different test results can indicate pre-diabetes or diabetes Fasting Blood Glucose Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) Random Blood Sugar (taken any time of day with or without fasting) A1C Ideal Result Less than 100mg/dl Less than 140 mg/dl Less than 140 (even after eating a large meal) Less than 5.7% Pre-diabetes 100-125mg/dl 140-199mg/dl 140-200 5.7% to 6.4% Diabetes 126mg/dl and greater 200 mg/dl and greater 200 or greater 6.5% or more Q: I have been told that I have diabetes, or "pre-diabetes", or that I am in the "honeymoon period" . My readings are all over the place: sometimes in the 120's, others in the 90's, sometimes, but rarely in the 150-170's. My doctor does not want to put me on medication yet. I exercise regularly and am not overweight though my diet is variable. I certainly like sweets, pizza, and pasta. What is the long term effect of these continued high blood sugar levels? A: Firstly, kudos for your physician for giving diet/lifestyle changes a chance to work. Reduction of body fat often is the first best start. This may or may not be true in your case but certainly sweets, pizza, etc. are affecting your numbers. If you can discipline yourself at this time to eat unrefined foods and be more active, your beta cells that produce insulin may get the rest they need to become efficient again. Our diabetes management booklet has many referenced foods/supplements that may help to stabilize your glucose levels. In time, your favorite foods may be reintroduced in moderate amounts. You appear to be more in the pre-diabetes range at this time. Complications are a long process. If your daytime levels stay under 120-140, that is good. Fasting levels are higher due to hormonal activity nighttime; these levels are a much sl Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

What Is Normal Blood Sugar?

Thank you for visiting my website! If you need help lowering your blood sugar level, check out my books at Amazon or Smashwords. If you’re outside of the U.S., Smashwords may be the best source. —Steve Parker, M.D. * * * Physicians focus so much on disease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What Is a Normal Blood Sugar Level? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate) ♦ ♦ ♦ Ranges of blood sugar for young healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. ♦ ♦ ♦ What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinol Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles. Young men with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range appear to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially if they are on the heavy side and have high serum triglyceride levels. That’s the finding of researchers who studied more than 13,000 apparently healthy young men in the Israeli defense forces. The investigators found that so-called "normal" test values may actually predict type 2 diabetes. "Higher fasting plasma glucose levels within the normoglycemic range constitute an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes among young men, and such levels may help, along with body-mass index and triglyceride levels, to identify apparently healthy men at increased risk for diabetes," wrote Amir Tirosh, M.D., Ph.D., from the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps and colleagues at various Israeli institutions. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels below 100 mg/dL (5.55 mmol/L) are considered to be normal, whereas levels between 100 mg/dL and 109 mg/dL signal impairment. But readings at the upper end of the normal limit – just below the 100 mg/dL threshold – might signal risk for future diabetes, and could serve as a risk marker. To see how things stood with glucose among young Israeli adults, they drew on data from the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults study, which tracks all Israeli service personnel older than 25. Participants fill out a detailed demographic, nutrition, lifestyle and medical questionnaire, and have blood samples drawn after a 14-hour fast. The study included data on 13,163 Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

I Had A Blood Panel Done And My Fasting Glucose Came Back At 104 Mg/dl. My Doctor Didn't Say A Word About It But I'm Wondering If I Have Prediabetes And What I Should Do About It.

I Had A Blood Panel Done And My Fasting Glucose Came Back At 104 Mg/dl. My Doctor Didn't Say A Word About It But I'm Wondering If I Have Prediabetes And What I Should Do About It.

I had a blood panel done and my fasting glucose came back at ... I had a blood panel done and my fasting glucose came back at 104 mg/dL. My doctor didn't say a word about it but I'm wondering if I have prediabetes and what I should do about it. There's a Google excerpt of a book called "Prediabetes: What you need to know to keep diabetes away," by Gretchen Becker. There are several pages of it online, and probably enough for you to know whether it would help you take control of this condition: I have to say that like Alison, I consider it incredibly surprising that your doctor wouldn't have talked to you about prediabetes, especially since with diet and lifestyle changes you can reverse the trend and avoid getting diabetes. Here's the American Diabetes Association's page on pre-diabetes. There are several more links on their page: And here's another page that has many links to lifestyle changes you can make: What else can we help you find out? Are you considering a repeat visit to your doctor's office to talk about this? Why was it recommended that you have a fasting glucose test performed? Do you have any signs or symptoms that were concerning, are you pregnant, have a family history of diabetes, or is this part of a regular check-up? I'm not understanding how your doctor did not say anything? I assume the lab is at a different location than your doctor's office, where your blood was drawn, and then your doctor received the lab results? Did you then go into your doctor's office, where s/he said, "your fasting glucose result is 104 mg/dL", and then walked away? There was no explanation of the number, or any written information provided? Was there a recommendation for a second lab test? I know it is so difficult to advocate for yourself at the doctor's office, when it s Continue reading >>

Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Level For Women

Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Level For Women

Your cells require glucose, a simple sugar, to keep your heart beating, your muscles pumping, and otherwise support everything your body does. You obtain glucose from the carbohydrates you eat; even complex carbohydrates can be broken down to simple sugars. The normal range of blood glucose for women depends on how much she ate and when. High blood sugar can be harmful to your health by stressing your kidneys and nervous system, and is used to diagnose diabetes mellitus. Health care providers use a variety of laboratory tests to check blood sugar levels, some that require fasting for up to 12 hours before the blood is drawn. Blood glucose levels that are too high suggest insufficient insulin production, reduced insulin sensitivity, or a combination of the two. Video of the Day Your cells need glucose to make the energy that keeps your heart beating and your muscles warm. Your cells require insulin, a hormone secreted by your pancreas, to help move glucose from your bloodstream across the cell membrane. Abnormally high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, may indicate that the pancreas is not producing enough insulin, your cells are not sensitive to insulin, or a combination of the two. Fasting Blood Glucose Levels The most common test for blood sugar is the fasting plasma or blood glucose test, or FBG. For an accurate reading, it is necessary to fast starting at midnight the day that your blood is drawn. A normal fasting blood glucose level for women is the same as that for a man, ranging from 60 to 110 mg/dL. A person with a fasting blood glucose level of 115 to 125 mg/dL may have a condition known as impaired fasting glucose or "prediabetes." A fasting blood glucose level of 126 mg/dL or greater on at least two occasions diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Health care p Continue reading >>

Is There A 'safe' Blood Sugar Level?

Is There A 'safe' Blood Sugar Level?

What is the "safe" blood sugar level? I have heard several opinions from other diabetics, and I am very confused. I was told that it was 154 about a year ago, and my doctor didn't recommend daily monitoring. At one time on a morning fasting, my level was 74. — Theresa, Alabama Yes, there is a safe blood sugar level. It is the optimum range that safely provides the body with adequate amounts of energy. For the average person, it is 70 to 105 mg/dl in a fasting state. (Diabetes is diagnosed when the fasting blood glucose level is at or above 126 mg/dl.) Glucose values vary depending on the time of day, your activity level, and your diet. Your sugar level of 154 mg/dl, which is high, may not have been determined while you were fasting. If it had been, a physician would have repeated the test. Your doctor did, and your level was determined to be normal at 74 mg/dl. In this case, daily monitoring is probably not necessary. If your levels are elevated in the future, you will be diagnosed with diabetes. Treatment can include lifestyle modification, diet, and exercise. If these strategies are not adequate to control your blood glucose level, your physician may prescribe oral medicines or insulin. Having a laboratory examination during your yearly physical and maintaining a healthy lifestyle are adequate for now. Why is it important to keep your glucose level within a normal range? An excess of glucose in the bloodstream causes various chemical changes that lead to damage to our blood vessels, nerves, and cells. Each cell in the body has a function that requires energy, and this energy comes primarily from glucose. The energy allows you to perform various tasks, including talking and walking. It allows your heart to beat and your brain to produce chemicals and signals that hel Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Three Blood Tests To Help You Better Manage The Risks Of High Blood Sugar

Three Blood Tests To Help You Better Manage The Risks Of High Blood Sugar

Q: I noticed that on a recent blood test my fasting blood sugar is 105 mg/dL. Last checkup it was 100 mg/dL. My doctor says it’s fine and not to worry but everything I’ve read tells me that I might be on the road to diabetes or have something called impaired insulin sensitivity (or insulin resistance). Can you suggest some blood tests that would give me a better picture of my risk factors, especially since both diabetes and high cholesterol issues run in my family? A: That is a great question, and you are wise to raise it. You may have the condition referred to as “impaired glucose tolerance,” also known as “insulin resistance” or “prediabetes.” In other words, your glucose level is indeed too high if your goal is optimal health. Here’s why… Though mainstream medicine once tolerated blood sugars as high as 140 mg/dL as “normal,” we now recognize the substantial cardiovascular, stroke, and cancer risks posed by sugar levels anywhere above 85 mg/dL.1-4 Above that level, your tissues are exposed to glucose at concentrations that cause chemical reactions with your body’s proteins and fats called glycation. Glycated proteins and fats trigger inflammation and oxidative stress, major enemies of longevity. Virtually all chronic diseases of aging (and aging itself) are accelerated by high glucose levels. As blood sugar rises, your risk of dying also goes up by approximately 40% when fasting glucose consistently falls in the range of 110-124 mg/dL. Risk of dying doubles when fasting glucose reaches the range of 126-138 mg/dL.5 But glucose is only part of the story. In order to keep your sugar under control, your body puts out increasingly large amounts of insulin, the hormone we need to take sugar out of the bloodstream and drive it into cells. And insul Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 104mg/dl

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 104mg/dl

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have a single reading of 12 hour fasting blood sugar of 104mg/dl. My fbs is always normal these past years. Also my LDL is also high. im so frustrated and depressed because I'm only 22yrs old and i already have this health problems. I dont know what to do. Dont know where to start. I feel like this is the end for me. Is there anything i could do to make my FBS normal again?is it certain i will develope type 2 DM?this are the question in my mind. I am lost. Please Help me. If my conversions are right then this starving value isn't bad! Ur registering in at ~5.8mmol/L. As far as I know the UK tends to measure in the latter (and in Veterinary Medicine) 104 mg/dl is normal, it's 5.8 mmol/L. See what the average is over a period and stop worrying for the time being. Even if you are mostly over and in the pre diabetic stage, you can almost certainly bring it down again with diet and exercise. If my conversions are right then this starving value isn't bad! Ur registering in at ~5.8mmol/L. As far as I know the UK tends to measure in the latter (and in Veterinary Medicine) Im just a little overweight. but i began to exercise more and lost a pound. Is there anything i could do to lower it?its the first time i got tested for it. 104 mg/dl is normal, it's 5.8 mmol/L. See what the average is over a period and stop worrying for the time being. Even if you are mostly over and in the pre diabetic stage, you can almost certainly bring it down again with diet and exercise. Is it normal?but in my country it is in the prediabetic range. Why did they lower the bar?i so confused. i mean years ago the prediabetic range is at 110-126mg/dl now it is own to 101-126mg/dl. i d Continue reading >>

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