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Is Buckwheat Safe For Diabetics?

Buckwheat May Help Manage Diabetes

Buckwheat May Help Manage Diabetes

Nov. 21, 2003 -- A hearty grain commonly found in pancakes and soba noodles may help people with diabetes maintain healthy blood sugar levels. New research shows that the extract of buckwheat lowered meal-related blood sugar levels by 12%-19% when given to rats bred to have diabetes. Researchers say if further studies confirm these results, buckwheat may be used as a nutritional supplement or incorporated as a food into the diets of people with diabetes to help manage the disease. "With diabetes on the rise, incorporation of buckwheat into the diet could help provide a safe, easy and inexpensive way to lower glucose levels and reduce the risk of complications associated with the disease, including heart, nerve, and kidney problems," says researcher Carla G. Taylor, PhD, associate professor in the department of human nutritional sciences at the University of Manitoba in Canada, in a news release. "Buckwheat won't cure diabetes, but we'd like to evaluate its inclusion in food products as a management aid," says Taylor. In the study, published in the Dec. 3 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers compared the effects of a single dose of buckwheat extract or a placebo on blood sugar levels in about 40 diabetic rats. The rats were bred to have type 1 diabetes, which is the less common form of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes (previously known as insulin-dependent diabetes) do not produce the hormone insulin needed to maintain normal blood sugar levels and are treated with daily insulin shots. Researchers found that diabetic rats fed buckwheat extract prior to eating a meal containing sugar had blood sugar levels 12%-19% lower than the diabetic rats fed the placebo, which suggests that the extract can lower blood sugar levels after a meal. Al Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Buckwheat: Diabetes Prevention

16 Amazing Health Benefits Of Buckwheat: Diabetes Prevention

Buckwheat is not on people’s plates as much as it should be. This food is packed with a variety of nutrients, such as dietary fiber, B vitamins, magnesium, potassium, and all nine essential amino acids (which are rarely found in plant-based foods). On top of that, the buckwheat plant is not susceptible to any major pests or disease, which means that it’s easy to grow. This makes it an incredibly inexpensive food item that you can add to your cart the next time you go grocery shopping. Top 16 Health Benefits of Buckwheat Top 16 Health Benefits of Buckwheat Despite what some people may think, buckwheat is actually low on the glycemic index. The carbohydrates that are present in this food are complex, which means that they’re slowly absorbed into the bloodstream. Thanks to these complex carbs, buckwheat will help you fight imbalances in blood sugar levels. If your nutrition doesn’t help you fight these imbalances, then you may start to experience fatigue, inflammation, and diabetes. By consuming more buckwheat, you’ll notice improved blood sugar levels and reduced insulin resistance. By eating just one cup of buckwheat, you will be consuming six grams of dietary fiber. This will not only hasten the transportation of food through your digestive tract, but it will also make you feel full for an extended time period. Dietary fiber is a nutrient that’s extremely important for the regulation of bowel movements. Thanks to its antioxidant content, buckwheat is also able to protect your digestive organs from infection, cancer, and other health-threatening complications. Buckwheat is known for being a natural probiotic as well, meaning that it can nourish the good bacteria in your gut. When it comes to appearance, texture, and taste, many would say that buckwheat is alm Continue reading >>

Bbc News | Health | Buckwheat 'controls Diabetes'

Bbc News | Health | Buckwheat 'controls Diabetes'

A type of herb called buckwheat may be beneficial in the management of diabetes, say researchers. Extracts of the seed lowered blood glucose levels by up to 19% when it was fed to diabetic rats. Scientists at the University of Manitoba in Canada say diabetics should consider including the grain in their diet, or taking dietary supplements. The study, part funded by the food industry, is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. A food that could actively reduce blood glucose levels could be a real breakthrough. Lead researcher Dr Carla Taylor said: "With diabetes on the rise, incorporation of buckwheat into the diet could help provide a safe, easy and inexpensive way to lower glucose levels and reduce the risk of complications associated with the disease, including heart, nerve and kidney problems. "Buckwheat won't cure diabetes, but we'd like to evaluate its inclusion in food products as a management aid." However, Dr Taylor said human studies were needed to determine how much buckwheat - in flour or extract form - must be eaten to obtain a beneficial effect on blood sugar levels. The researchers focused on rats with Type 1 diabetes caused by a lack of the hormone insulin, which is needed to break down sugar in the blood. The rats were given a single dose of buckwheat extract or a dummy preparation. The researchers believe the key component of buckwheat is a compound called chiro-inositol. The compound, which is relatively high in buckwheat and rarely found in other foods, has been previously shown in animal and human studies to play a significant role in glucose metabolism and cell signalling. Researchers do not know exactly how it works, but preliminary evidence suggest that it may make the cells more sensitive to insulin or may act as an insulin Continue reading >>

Enjoying The Best Grains For Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

Enjoying The Best Grains For Diabetes – Your Healthy Kitchen

If you have diabetes, should you stop eating bread, rice and pasta? While everyone with diabetes (and pre-diabetes) benefits from eliminating processed grains from their diet (foods like white rice, cold cereals, white bread and snack foods), some individuals benefit from avoiding whole grain products as well. Others can lose weight and normalize blood sugar levels while still enjoying grains. However, if you eat grains, it’s important to be picky about the type and portion size of the grains you choose. Individuals who have difficulty losing weight and controlling blood sugar levels sometimes benefit from eliminating all grains, including whole grains, from their diets for a while. Whole and processed grains contain an easily digested type of starch that can trigger spikes in blood sugar levels after meals, leading to weight gain and many of the complications of diabetes. Some people find that they can add whole grains back into their diets after they reach their weight and blood sugar goals. Others with diabetes can maintain good health while still enjoying grains, but find that it is important to eat only whole grains, and in moderate quantities. Serving grains as a side dish, or about ¼ of a meal, is a helpful strategy that lends itself to healthy weight management and blood sugar control. So what are whole grains and why are they nutritionally superior to processed grains? All true grains, including rice, wheat, barley and corn, are seeds that come from different types of grasses. A whole grain consists of three basic components: an outer layer called the bran, a starchy center called the endosperm, and a tiny, oil-packed germ, which is the part of the seed which sprouts and grows into a new plant. There is also an area just under the Bran, where many important Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Eaten as a staple food across many parts of the world, grains exist in our diets in many forms, offering an important source of energy. It’s common knowledge that whole grains are good for us, from rice and wheat, to barley and quinoa. Much of the nutrient goodness of grains are found in the bran and germ of the seed, which is why it’s important to eat grains without these parts being milled off first – this is what the term ‘whole grain’ refers to. Grains in your diet Whole grains are wonderfully versatile – add them to salads for texture, bulk up a soup or stew, blend them in burgers or use directly as a meat alternative, or combine them whole in baked goods. They aren’t hard to include in your everyday eating routine and a little whole grain goes a long way! Packed with nutrients What do wholegrains contain? Fibre B vitamins Folic acid Essential fatty acids Protein Antioxidants Micro-nutrients Cooking with grains Cooking most grains is very similar to cooking rice – simply add the dry grain to a pan of water or broth, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed. For a healthy boost of nutrients,experiment with different grains in different forms to bring variety to your meals. Which grain to choose? Amaranth With roughly 60 varieties in total, amaranth is not technically a grain but is of similar nutrition value and usage. These tiny grains have a slightly peppery flavour and can be cooked in water, popped like corn or added to baked goods to increase protein content. Barley For those seeking high fibre, you don’t get much better than barley. Often found as a flour, barley makes a closely textured bread with a slightly sweet flavour. Buckwheat Related to rhubarb, buckwheat is also not a grain as such, but i Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

Best Flour To Use If You’re Diabetic?

When it comes to flours, making the right choice is very important to blood sugar control. So we've gathered some great info here for you to use in your kitchen and menu preparations. Are Grains & Flour Really Good For Fiber? We've often been told that eating whole grains is a great source of fiber. And while ‘whole grains' do provide some fiber they are not the only thing that provide us with our daily fiber needs, vegetables do too. For example: 1 slice of wholewheat bread has 1.9 g of fiber, while a carrot has 2.3 g. All grains and vegetables do range in fiber content, but vegetables are a great source of daily fiber and are also higher in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants than grains. So we don't have to eat grains in order to get adequate fiber. Changing A Grain Into A Flour Changes The Way It Affects Blood Sugar Often when we take a grain and make it into flour, it changes the carb and fiber content. So what tends to happen for you as a diabetic is that most types of flours will make your blood sugar spike like wild fire. At least that's what most people experience, which is why our meal plans contain virtually no grain flours at all. An example of this is buckwheat. Eaten whole it has a glycemic index (GI) of around 49, which is a low GI. But take it and turn it into bread and it changes to a GI of 67, meaning it affects your blood sugar more rapidly and more intensely than eating the whole grain itself. Here is another example using wheat. Whole wheat kernals are a very low GI of 30, but we don't tend to eat whole wheat kernals, we eat whole wheat flour and it has an average GI of around 74. Whole Grain Flours Are A Better Option It's true that whole grains are better as far as nutrition goes. As the Minnesota Department of Health explains, the whole grain Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Post 01 - Benefits Of Buckwheat : Dr.bernstein & Diabetes : Active Low-carber Forums

Post 01 - Benefits Of Buckwheat : Dr.bernstein & Diabetes : Active Low-carber Forums

This and all of my posts are intended for Type 2 Diabetics ------------------------------------------- Buckwheat noodles, buckwheat seeds (like a grain) and homemade buckwheat bread have been part of my diet for 4 years now. Buckwheat is not a "wheat" product and it does not contain gluten. Buckwheat as a flour to make bread does not bind together as well as wheat flour, so we mix it perhaps around 50/50 with wheat. Commercially sold buckwheat noodles can be purchased as 100% pure buckwheat. The buckwheat seeds can also be purchased and they can be cooked just like a grain, very similar to the way we cook rice, or it can be ground into a flour. Buckwheat flour is also commercially sold and 100% buckwheat breads are possible, but it is a little grainier than when made with wheat flour. It can be purchased in most asian stores and many health food stores. Just eating buckwheat once in a while will not likely produce a noticeable health benefit, for example; eating it once a month, but I eat it 2 or 3 times a week and it is part of what keeps my blood sugars stable. Let me point out; buckwheat is a rare plant food that is also a complete protein......................... I've now gone over three years without medications and for the past year, I've hardly used any herbal products to control my blood sugar. I literally can go weeks and months without diabetic herbal supplementation and keep my blood sugars in normal ranges. I'm going to start a series of posts by number for those interested in following them, as it might be easier to follow them that way. I will be posting some of the foods that I feel have contributed to my being able to control diabetes the way I do. I would like to also point out that I don't restrict myself from any food or food group. I use variety and Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar | Buckwheat For Your Health

Blood Sugar | Buckwheat For Your Health

Learn more about this superfood Buckwheat! Posted in Healthy Living by buckwheathealth Just how much do you know? Often people with diabetes might not know they even have it. The symptoms may not be obvious. It may not happen you but it could happen to your friends or family members. It is good to have some general knowledge of what diabetes is. There are 3 main types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational diabetes. Also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It occurs when our body cannot produce insulin. The immune system attacks insulin producing cells in the pancreas. This type of diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, and was previously known as juvenile diabetes. There is the risk of other serious complications such as heart disease, nerve damage, blindness, and kidney damage. Symptoms can include increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss even with increased appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, and absence of menstruation. This is the most common type of diabetesdiagnosed. It progresses slowly and may cause symptoms such as skin infections, poor healing, kidney problems, and vision problems. It is possible that the diabetes is not diagnosed after years of mild symptoms. Many people do not show not severe symptoms and as a result did not seek medical care. Gestational diabetes occurs during a womans pregnancy where they have high blood sugar levels. It affects 4 % of all women during pregnancy. Symptoms include increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss in spite of increased appetite, fatigue, nausea and vomiting and frequent infections including those of the bladder, vagina, and skin. It is possible for gestational diabetes to be missed in pregnancy. Thats why it is important to get tested because it could ha Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Buckwheat?

Are You Eating Buckwheat?

Are You Eating Buckwheat? Buckwheat may be one of the healthiest foods you’re not eating. Along with having numerous health benefits, it is tasty, easy to prepare and inexpensive. Here are some things I love about it: Buckwheat is not a grain. Many who are trying to avoid grains find themselves limited to fruit and sweet potatoes as sources of good carbs. Even though it’s often included in lists of grains, buckwheat is not a grain. The edible portion is a seed from a plant related to greens like rhubarb and sorrel. Buckwheat is gluten-free. Because it is neither a grain nor related to wheat, buckwheat is gluten-free and safe for those with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities. Studies show that even in high concentrations, buckwheat flour and its purified proteins have no immunologic reactions for patients with celiac disease. [1] Buckwheat is high in essential nutrients. It is rich in many trace minerals, including manganese, magnesium and copper. It is also a good source of the B vitamins: B6, pantothenic acid, niacin, folate, thiamin and choline. Nutrients in Buckwheat[2] Buckwheat has resistant fiber. Resistant fiber is a compound shown to lower blood sugar after meals, help weight loss, reduce food cravings and improve diabetes. [3] All versions of buckwheat contain resistant fiber, but the boiled kernels, called groats, contain the most at 6 percent or greater. [4] Buckwheat has several novel nutraceuticals. Rutin, quercetin and other bioflavonoids: These compounds have been shown to strengthen small blood vessels, which can prevent easy bruising, hemorrhoids and varicose veins. Rutin can also help prevent blood clots, lower LDL cholesterol and the production of histamine, which can improve airborne allergies and food intolerances. [5] Tannins: Tannins are Continue reading >>

Buckwheat

Buckwheat

Energizing and nutritious, buckwheat is available throughout the year and can be served as an alternative to rice or made into porridge. While many people think that buckwheat is a cereal grain, it is actually a fruit seed that is related to rhubarb and sorrel making it a suitable substitute for grains for people who are sensitive to wheat or other grains that contain protein glutens. Buckwheat flowers are very fragrant and are attractive to bees that use them to produce a special, strongly flavored, dark honey. Calories: 155 GI: low This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Buckwheat provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Buckwheat can be found in the Food Rating System Chart. A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Buckwheat, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart. Health Benefits A Grain That's Good for Your Cardiovascular System Diets that contain buckwheat have been linked to lowered risk of developing high cholesterol and high blood pressure. The Yi people of China consume a diet high in buckwheat (100 grams per day, about 3.5 ounces). When researchers tested blood lipids of 805 Yi Chinese, they found that buckwheat intake was associated with lower total serum cholesterol, lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL, the form linked to cardiovascular disease), and a high ratio of HDL (health-promoting cholesterol) to total cholesterol. Buckwheat's beneficial effects are due in part to its rich supply of flavonoids, particularly rutin. Flavonoids are phytonutrients that protect against disease by extending the action of v Continue reading >>

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