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Is Blood Sugar Of 157 High?

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Diabetes is defined as a disease in which a person has high blood sugar. The problem is that physicians are failing to determine how low blood glucose needs to be to protect against dreaded diabetic complications. In a series of published studies, the definition of what constitutes diabetes, (or said differently, a person with high blood sugar) is about to be turned upside down. This is not a trivial matter. The term "diabetic complications" encompasses the most common diseases of aging, ranging from kidney failure1-3 and blindness,4-6 to heart disease,7-12 stroke,13,14 neuropathy,15,16 and even cancer.17-22 This means that most degenerative disease can be traced back to undiagnosed glucose control problems, which we assert will soon become the new definition of diabetes. High blood sugar appears to be the leading killer today, yet the medical mainstream is not properly diagnosing or treating it. The tragic result is an epidemic of diabetic complications that cripple and kill millions of Americans because simple steps are not being taken to suppress after-meal glucose spikes. As you are about to learn, it is not just elevated fasting glucose that creates diabetic complications. Excess after-meal glucose surges have turned into a silent diabetes plague, thus mandating new steps be taken to protect against what may be the leading cause of premature death. Fasting Glucose Is a Delayed Marker of Diabetes When people take blood tests to measure glucose levels, they are asked to fast for 8 to 12 hours. Doctors ask for this 8-12 hour fast because they want a consistent baseline to measure glucose and lipids in comparison with the general population. There is one problem with this. A person who suffers from dangerously high blood sugar several hours following a typical meal may Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar and the result was 157 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: 1 No Charge Glucose Meter Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch 2 How to flush belly bloat Cut a bit of belly bloat each day by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com A lot of factors do have influence on the ideal blood sugar level. While your blood sugar might be too low or too hight for a normal blood sugar, factors like exercising or eating do have impact on the ideal blood sugar level Do you want a more detailed report? Please select accordingly: My blood sugar was tested... 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 Here is 1 carb you must avoid if you struggle with weight gain. HealthPlus50 General information about High blood sugar (Hyperglycemia) Hyperglycemia, which is more commonly known as high blood sugar, occurs when the body is incapable of shuttling glucose out of the bloodstream so it can be transferred to cells for use as energy. In most cases, this condition is only a problem for diabetic individuals because these people suffer from dysfunction of insulin, the hormone used by the body for regulating blood sugar levels. Symptoms of high blood sugar Symptoms of hyperglycemia usually take several weeks to develop and can involve: Dry mouth and an unusual degree of thirst, which prompts the person to drink more water than normal. This condition is called polydipsia. Polyuria, which refers to an increased frequency of urination, particularly during nighttime. Polyphagia, which is an increase in both appetite and food consumption. Irritability Fatigue More serious symp Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose Reading Four Hours After A Meal

High Blood Glucose Reading Four Hours After A Meal

An elevated blood glucose level after eating may indicate you have diabetes. If you haven't been diagnosed, see your health care provider. If you're already being monitored for diabetes, a high blood glucose level may occur from changes in your routine, illness or due to medications. Over time, a chronically elevated blood glucose level may lead to complications such as kidney disease, eye problems, heart attack and stroke. According to Joslin Diabetes Center, blood glucose is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or greater. If two or more tests show your blood glucose is between 100 and 125 milligrams per deciliter four hours after a meal, also known as fasting blood sugar, you'll be diagnosed with prediabetes or impaired fasting glucose. Prediabetes puts you at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes and heart disease, according to Joslin Diabetes Center. If two or more tests show your blood glucose is greater than 126 four hours after a meal, you'll be diagnosed with diabetes. Making changes to your eating habits and exercise, oral prescriptions and insulin injections can all help lower your glucose levels four hours after eating. Changes in Your Routine If your blood glucose has been within normal range and has recently become elevated, examine any changes in your eating habits and exercise. Increasing your food intake, changing what you eat daily and eating too many high-carbohydrate or high-fat foods can cause fluctuation in your blood sugar. A decrease in physical activity may also cause an increase in your blood glucose. Track your food intake and exercise routine along with your blood glucose to identify any patterns that may be causing this increase. High blood glucose four hours after a meal may also be due to problems with your medication. If y Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 157 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate diabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the prediabetes range. Is 158 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. google_ad_client="ca-pub-5465481939459128";google_ad_slot="8353216499";google_ad_format="301x250";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_full_width_responsive_allowed=false;google_fwr_non_expansion_reason=4;google_responsive_formats=3;google_ad_width=301;google_ad_height=250;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=1;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893301","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893311"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=true;google_ad_unit_key="2718888811";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="1336929022";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=3;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_2";google_start_time=1514569396040;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2 Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Diabetes Tests & Diagnosis

Your health care professional can diagnose diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes through blood tests. The blood tests show if your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Do not try to diagnose yourself if you think you might have diabetes. Testing equipment that you can buy over the counter, such as a blood glucose meter, cannot diagnose diabetes. Who should be tested for diabetes? Anyone who has symptoms of diabetes should be tested for the disease. Some people will not have any symptoms but may have risk factors for diabetes and need to be tested. Testing allows health care professionals to find diabetes sooner and work with their patients to manage diabetes and prevent complications. Testing also allows health care professionals to find prediabetes. Making lifestyle changes to lose a modest amount of weight if you are overweight may help you delay or prevent type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Most often, testing for occurs in people with diabetes symptoms. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in children and young adults. Because type 1 diabetes can run in families, a study called TrialNet offers free testing to family members of people with the disease, even if they don’t have symptoms. Type 2 diabetes Experts recommend routine testing for type 2 diabetes if you are age 45 or older are between the ages of 19 and 44, are overweight or obese, and have one or more other diabetes risk factors are a woman who had gestational diabetes1 Medicare covers the cost of diabetes tests for people with certain risk factors for diabetes. If you have Medicare, find out if you qualify for coverage . If you have different insurance, ask your insurance company if it covers diabetes tests. Though type 2 diabetes most often develops in adults, children also ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

Under the Julian Bakery Bread thread, a poster named Aurelia asks Do you also have noticeable physical symptoms of elevated blood sugar? I know when my blood sugar rises over about 130 because my heart starts to hammer and I feel flushed. At your peak of 157 I would also be nauseated. I have wondered how common that is. No, no real symptoms. I felt a little tired, but that could be, you know, being tired. Other than that, nothing. When doing tests like this in the past, I've learned that my hunger kicks in not so much in response to a particular blood sugar level, but in response to a really fast decline. Didn't get one here. I was hungry by the end of the test time, but then it was pushing dinner time, I probably would have been hungry anyway. My true fasting BG runs a little high, anyway, anywhere from 95 (high normal) to 110 (prediabetic.) This worried me some, until just the other day. Under the thread "Well, Hmmmmm..." about intermittent fasting, there's a response about my concern with my fasting BG, with a link to the Hyperlipid blog (which has been added to the blogroll.) The author explains that long-time low carbing actually does result in mildly elevated fasting BG, because it increases insulin resistance. Sounds bad, but turns out it's not. It's a normal response to the muscle cells learning to run on free fatty acids and ketones -- since they don't need glucose anymore, they shunt it back to the bloodstream, where it's available for tissues that can better use it, like the brain. This explains why, in Atkins Diabetes Revolution, the new book by Dr. Mary Vernon and Jacqueline Eberstein, who completed the book Dr. Atkins had long planned to write, it is stated that if you have been on a low carb diet for any length of time, you must spend at least a few days Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Peter's fasting blood glucose: 89 mg/dl--perfect. After one whole wheat bagel, apple, black coffee: 157 mg/dl--diabetic-range. How common is this: Normal fasting blood sugar with diabetic range postprandial (after-eating) blood sugar? It is shockingly common. The endocrinologists have known this for some years, since a number of studies using oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) have demonstrated that fasting glucose is not a good method of screening people for diabetes or pre-diabetes, nor does it predict the magnitude of postprandial glucose. (In an OGTT, you usually drink 75 grams of glucose as a cola drink, followed by blood sugar checks. The conventional cut off for "impaired glucose tolerance" is 140-200 mg/dl; diabetes is 200 mg/dl or greater.) People with glucose levels during OGTT as high as 200 mg/dl may have normal fasting values below 100 mg/dl. High postprandial glucose values are a coronary risk factor. While conventional guidelines say that a postprandial glucose (i.e., during OGTT) of 140 mg/dl or greater is a concern, coronary risk starts well below this. Risk is increased approximately 50% at 126 mg/dl. Risk may begin with postprandial glucoses as low as 100 mg/dl. For this reason, postprandial (not OGTT) glucose checks are becoming an integral part of the Track Your Plaque program. We encourage postprandial blood glucose checks, followed by efforts to reduce postprandial glucose if they are high. More on this in future. Continue reading >>

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