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Is Blood Sugar Of 157 High?

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

Blood Glucose Levels High In Morning & Low After Eating

You may be puzzled by a high blood glucose reading in the morning despite going to bed with a good reading the night before. Or your postmeal blood glucose may be lower than the reading before you ate. Unusual blood glucose fluctuation can be frustrating for diabetics and is affected by many factors. Keeping a good record of your diet, medication and blood glucose can often help you solve the mystery. Video of the Day If you consistently wake up with higher blood glucose levels despite being compliant with your meal plan, this could be a condition known as the dawn phenomenon, states the American Diabetes Association. Dawn phenomenon is a a sudden rise of blood glucose levels 10 to 20 milligrams per deciliter in the early morning between 2:00 and 8:00 a.m. It is caused by an increased release of hormones such as cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine while your body is preparing to wake up. These hormones increase insulin resistance and stimulate your liver to release glucose, causing blood glucose levels to rise. Insufficient insulin or medication, excessive carbohydrate snacks at bedtime or high-fat meals at dinner may also cause blood glucose to be elevated in the morning. To rule out if your high blood glucose is due to dawn phenomenon, your endocrinologist may ask you to eat a low-fat, carbohydrate-controlled dinner, maintain your usual physical activities and check your blood glucose around 2 or 3 a.m. for several days. Your doctor will help you determine if you have dawn phenomenon and adjust your medications accordingly. If the fluctuation is due to food, your dietitian may alter your meal plan and may suggest that you skip a bedtime snack or change the type of snack to a lean protein, modify your dinner or add some light exercise after dinner. When you wake up with Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Diabetes is defined as a disease in which a person has high blood sugar. The problem is that physicians are failing to determine how low blood glucose needs to be to protect against dreaded diabetic complications. In a series of published studies, the definition of what constitutes diabetes, (or said differently, a person with high blood sugar) is about to be turned upside down. This is not a trivial matter. The term "diabetic complications" encompasses the most common diseases of aging, ranging from kidney failure1-3 and blindness,4-6 to heart disease,7-12 stroke,13,14 neuropathy,15,16 and even cancer.17-22 This means that most degenerative disease can be traced back to undiagnosed glucose control problems, which we assert will soon become the new definition of diabetes. High blood sugar appears to be the leading killer today, yet the medical mainstream is not properly diagnosing or treating it. The tragic result is an epidemic of diabetic complications that cripple and kill millions of Americans because simple steps are not being taken to suppress after-meal glucose spikes. As you are about to learn, it is not just elevated fasting glucose that creates diabetic complications. Excess after-meal glucose surges have turned into a silent diabetes plague, thus mandating new steps be taken to protect against what may be the leading cause of premature death. Fasting Glucose Is a Delayed Marker of Diabetes When people take blood tests to measure glucose levels, they are asked to fast for 8 to 12 hours. Doctors ask for this 8-12 hour fast because they want a consistent baseline to measure glucose and lipids in comparison with the general population. There is one problem with this. A person who suffers from dangerously high blood sugar several hours following a typical meal may Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the body’s inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: • Age 50 and under: Less than 140 mg/dl • Age 50 – 60: Less than 150 mg/dl • Over age 60: Less than 160 mg/dl A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individual’s particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a person’s postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. • Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. • Extreme stress: Stress produces the body’s fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glucose it has previously stored for energy. • Eating or drinking after the meal and before testing the blood sugar: Continuing to eat will keep blood sugars closer to their immediate post-meal levels. Studies show that 15 to 20 minutes of moderate exercise, such as walking, shortly after a meal may improve glucos Continue reading >>

What Is The Ideal Time To Check The Blood Glucose Level?

What Is The Ideal Time To Check The Blood Glucose Level?

What is the ideal time to check the blood glucose level? For people with diabetes: The timing of the test should be either before or after a meal. It is generally recommended that the test be done before breakfast, lunch or dinner or they should be done two hours after breakfast, lunch or dinner. During pregnancy: The timing of test again can be either before breakfast, lunch or dinner; however, post-meal readings should be taken - 1-1.5 hours after food. In some cases midnight blood glucose may be required to be checked. The ideal blood glucose level control should be as follows: Glucose level mentioned in blood are in mg/dl. To convert mmol/litre into mg/dl (milligrams per deci-litre) the value should be multiplied by 18 (eg. 10 mmol/dl is same as 180mg/dl) Start screening for diabetic retinopathy and other eye problems in your Clinic or Hospital We offer an online seamless solution that can benefit the patients. Please fill the form and submit it to us and a representative will call you and Discuss your requirements * Required Published on Feb 01, 2016 Last Updated on Feb 01, 2016 Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Blood Sugar: Fasting Vs. Postprandial

Peter's fasting blood glucose: 89 mg/dl--perfect. After one whole wheat bagel, apple, black coffee: 157 mg/dl--diabetic-range. How common is this: Normal fasting blood sugar with diabetic range postprandial (after-eating) blood sugar? It is shockingly common. The endocrinologists have known this for some years, since a number of studies using oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) have demonstrated that fasting glucose is not a good method of screening people for diabetes or pre-diabetes, nor does it predict the magnitude of postprandial glucose. (In an OGTT, you usually drink 75 grams of glucose as a cola drink, followed by blood sugar checks. The conventional cut off for "impaired glucose tolerance" is 140-200 mg/dl; diabetes is 200 mg/dl or greater.) People with glucose levels during OGTT as high as 200 mg/dl may have normal fasting values below 100 mg/dl. High postprandial glucose values are a coronary risk factor. While conventional guidelines say that a postprandial glucose (i.e., during OGTT) of 140 mg/dl or greater is a concern, coronary risk starts well below this. Risk is increased approximately 50% at 126 mg/dl. Risk may begin with postprandial glucoses as low as 100 mg/dl. For this reason, postprandial (not OGTT) glucose checks are becoming an integral part of the Track Your Plaque program. We encourage postprandial blood glucose checks, followed by efforts to reduce postprandial glucose if they are high. More on this in future. Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

High Blood Sugar Symptoms?

Under the Julian Bakery Bread thread, a poster named Aurelia asks Do you also have noticeable physical symptoms of elevated blood sugar? I know when my blood sugar rises over about 130 because my heart starts to hammer and I feel flushed. At your peak of 157 I would also be nauseated. I have wondered how common that is. No, no real symptoms. I felt a little tired, but that could be, you know, being tired. Other than that, nothing. When doing tests like this in the past, I've learned that my hunger kicks in not so much in response to a particular blood sugar level, but in response to a really fast decline. Didn't get one here. I was hungry by the end of the test time, but then it was pushing dinner time, I probably would have been hungry anyway. My true fasting BG runs a little high, anyway, anywhere from 95 (high normal) to 110 (prediabetic.) This worried me some, until just the other day. Under the thread "Well, Hmmmmm..." about intermittent fasting, there's a response about my concern with my fasting BG, with a link to the Hyperlipid blog (which has been added to the blogroll.) The author explains that long-time low carbing actually does result in mildly elevated fasting BG, because it increases insulin resistance. Sounds bad, but turns out it's not. It's a normal response to the muscle cells learning to run on free fatty acids and ketones -- since they don't need glucose anymore, they shunt it back to the bloodstream, where it's available for tissues that can better use it, like the brain. This explains why, in Atkins Diabetes Revolution, the new book by Dr. Mary Vernon and Jacqueline Eberstein, who completed the book Dr. Atkins had long planned to write, it is stated that if you have been on a low carb diet for any length of time, you must spend at least a few days Continue reading >>

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 157 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate diabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the prediabetes range. Is 158 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. google_ad_client="ca-pub-5465481939459128";google_ad_slot="8353216499";google_ad_format="301x250";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_full_width_responsive_allowed=false;google_fwr_non_expansion_reason=4;google_responsive_formats=3;google_ad_width=301;google_ad_height=250;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=1;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893301","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893311"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=true;google_ad_unit_key="2718888811";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="1336929022";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=3;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_2";google_start_time=1514569396040;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2 Continue reading >>

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

Checking your blood sugar (glucose) has become an easy and relatively inexpensive tool that just about anybody can incorporate into health habits. More often than not, it can provide you with some unexpected insights about your response to diet. You and I can now purchase our own blood glucose monitor at stores like Walmart and Walgreens for $10-20. (You will also need to purchase the fingerstick lancets and test strips; the test strips are the most costly part of the picture, usually running $0.50 to $1.00 per test strip. But since people without diabetes check their blood sugar only occasionally, the cost of the test strips is, over time, modest.) If you’re not a diabetic, why bother checking blood sugar? New studies are documenting the fact that increased levels of blood sugar below the diabetic range are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In the 22,000-participant DECODE study, for example, risk for heart attack and death from heart disease increased statistically beginning at a fasting blood sugar ≥110 mg/dl. Even more than fasting blood sugars, after-eating,or postprandial, blood sugars are proving to be a powerful predictor of heart attack. In other words, the increase in blood sugar that occurs in the 1-2 hours after a meal has been associated with greater risk for heart disease: the higher the blood sugar after a meal, the greater the risk for heart disease. While it is not clear where begins to increase, but long-term risk for heart disease is 30-60% greater at 140 mg/dl. What does blood sugar have to do with heart disease? It is becoming clear that surges in blood sugar that occur after a meal (or after soft drinks, cookies, or other snacks) injures arteries, triggering inflammatory and antioxidative responses. Even a single su Continue reading >>

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