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Is Blood Sugar Of 157 High?

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen right away,” says UCLA endocrinologist Preethi Srikanthan, MD. “But it has taken them a decade or two to get to this point, and it will take a while for them to even get to that initial 5% to 10% reduction in weight.” To make a lasting change, take small steps, Ahmann says. If you try to do more than you can handle, you might quit. Before you start a new exercise program, talk with your doctor, especially if you aren’t active now. They can help you set goals and plan a routine that’s safe and effective. Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

What Is A Normal Blood Glucose Level For Someone With Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Is 157 Mg/dl Blood Sugar From A Glucose Test Normal?

Here we will look at a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level from a Glucose test result and tell you what it may mean. Is 157 mg/dL blood sugar good or bad? Note that blood sugar tests should be done multiple times and the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level should be an average of those numbers. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, there is a Fasting Glucose Test and a Random Glucose Test. Below you can see what different results may mean. Fasting Glucose Test 70 - 100 mg/dL = Normal 101 - 125 mg/dL = Prediabetes 126 and above = Diabetes Therefore, according to the chart above, if the 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Fasting Glucose Test, then it may indicate diabetes. Random Glucose Test Below 125 mg/dL = Normal 126 - 199 mg/dL = Prediabetes 200 and above = Diabetes If the test result of a 157 mg/dL blood sugar level was from a Random Glucose Test, then the result would indicate it to be in the prediabetes range. Is 158 mg/dL Blood Sugar from a Glucose test normal? Go here for the next blood sugar level on our list. google_ad_client="ca-pub-5465481939459128";google_ad_slot="8353216499";google_ad_format="301x250";google_adsbygoogle_status="done";google_full_width_responsive_allowed=false;google_fwr_non_expansion_reason=4;google_responsive_formats=3;google_ad_width=301;google_ad_height=250;google_ad_resizable=true;google_override_format=1;google_responsive_auto_format=1;google_loader_features_used=128;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893301","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893311"]};google_loader_used="aa";google_reactive_tag_first=true;google_ad_unit_key="2718888811";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="1336929022";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=3;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_2";google_start_time=1514569396040;google_pub_vars="JTdCJTIyZ29vZ2xlX2FkX2 Continue reading >>

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

You Don't Have To Be Diabetic To Check Your Blood Sugar

Checking your blood sugar (glucose) has become an easy and relatively inexpensive tool that just about anybody can incorporate into health habits. More often than not, it can provide you with some unexpected insights about your response to diet. You and I can now purchase our own blood glucose monitor at stores like Walmart and Walgreens for $10-20. (You will also need to purchase the fingerstick lancets and test strips; the test strips are the most costly part of the picture, usually running $0.50 to $1.00 per test strip. But since people without diabetes check their blood sugar only occasionally, the cost of the test strips is, over time, modest.) If you’re not a diabetic, why bother checking blood sugar? New studies are documenting the fact that increased levels of blood sugar below the diabetic range are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In the 22,000-participant DECODE study, for example, risk for heart attack and death from heart disease increased statistically beginning at a fasting blood sugar ≥110 mg/dl. Even more than fasting blood sugars, after-eating,or postprandial, blood sugars are proving to be a powerful predictor of heart attack. In other words, the increase in blood sugar that occurs in the 1-2 hours after a meal has been associated with greater risk for heart disease: the higher the blood sugar after a meal, the greater the risk for heart disease. While it is not clear where begins to increase, but long-term risk for heart disease is 30-60% greater at 140 mg/dl. What does blood sugar have to do with heart disease? It is becoming clear that surges in blood sugar that occur after a meal (or after soft drinks, cookies, or other snacks) injures arteries, triggering inflammatory and antioxidative responses. Even a single su Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

High Sugar Level in Just One Week! How I Lowered My Diabetic High Blood Sugar From 399 mg/dl to 112 mg/dl in Just One Week! UPDATE: In January of 2017 I weighed 215 pounds. Today is June 7th and I weighed 150.2 today!!! Amen! I've lost 65 pounds in just a few months!!! Here's a ukulele video I made last month, showing before and after. My sugar last year was 399 mg/dl, but is now 75 mg/dl. My mmol/L was 9.8 last year, but was 6.7 two months ago when I weighed 185. My doctor said my diabetes is all GONE! I've lost another 35 pounds and am now 150 pounds. I'll get my glucose tested again in a couple weeks, which should be 5 point something. My friend, LOSE WEIGHT if you want to get rid of the type II diabetes. I explain in the video and notes how I lost so much weight. I DIDN'T take any diabetes drugs!!! I DIDN'T take any pills or follow anyone's quack diet plan. I simply limited my daily calories to 1,000 or less, and walked a couple hours a day, here a little and there a little. Drink only water. Eat big salads (with hardly any dressing) and stay away from processed and breaded foods. Eat tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, AND FAST A DAY OR TWO EACH WEEK, eating nothing! Don't let people tell you it's unhealthy to eat under 1,000 calories a day. It depends what you're eating. Losing your feet to diabetes is MUCH WORSE! Americans are plagued with “SITTING DISEASE,” sedentary, gluttons and lazy. If you are type II diabetic, like me, this may perhaps be the most important article you ever read concerning your health. I can help you tremendously! I have nothing to sell. I am a born-again Christian and I want to help as many people as I can. You'll love me after reading this article if you have type II diabetes. But before I begin, please understand that I am not a profession Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart

Blood Sugar Level Chart

A blood sugar level chart can help you understand the levels of healthy blood sugar. Some of the tests listed below must be prescribed and administered by a doctor or medical clinic, but you can also use these charts along with a glucometer (a tool to test blood sugar at home) to decide which foods cause blood sugar spikes, and which to avoid to maintain low levels of blood sugar and hence, good health. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com Fasting Blood Sugar Test Fasting blood sugar is a measurement of your blood sugar after not eating for 8-12 hours. This test is normally included with a CBC (complete blood chemistry) blood test. A CBC is a test often ordered by doctors when doing a complete health evaluation. Fasting blood sugars are evaluated as follows: Fasting blood sugars after 8-12 without food: Normal blood sugar range: between 60- 100 mg/dL Pre -Diabetic range: between 101- 126 mg /dL Diabetic range: more than 126 mg/dL on two different blood test occasions Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is used to test the body’s ability to metabolize a specific amount of glucose, clear it from the blood stream and return blood sugar levels to normal. The patient is asked to eat normally for several days before the test. No food should be taken for 8-10 hours before the test, and there is no eating during the test. To begin the test, a fasting blood sugar is taken. Then the patient drinks a sweet liquid which contains approximately 75 grams of sugar in the form of glucose. The drink must be finished in 5 minutes. After sitting quietly for one to two hours, the patient’s blood sugar is re-tested and evaluated as follows on this blood s Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

What Is The Ideal Time To Check The Blood Glucose Level?

What Is The Ideal Time To Check The Blood Glucose Level?

What is the ideal time to check the blood glucose level? For people with diabetes: The timing of the test should be either before or after a meal. It is generally recommended that the test be done before breakfast, lunch or dinner or they should be done two hours after breakfast, lunch or dinner. During pregnancy: The timing of test again can be either before breakfast, lunch or dinner; however, post-meal readings should be taken - 1-1.5 hours after food. In some cases midnight blood glucose may be required to be checked. The ideal blood glucose level control should be as follows: Glucose level mentioned in blood are in mg/dl. To convert mmol/litre into mg/dl (milligrams per deci-litre) the value should be multiplied by 18 (eg. 10 mmol/dl is same as 180mg/dl) Start screening for diabetic retinopathy and other eye problems in your Clinic or Hospital We offer an online seamless solution that can benefit the patients. Please fill the form and submit it to us and a representative will call you and Discuss your requirements * Required Published on Feb 01, 2016 Last Updated on Feb 01, 2016 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 157 Mg/dl (8.71mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar and the result was 157 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: 1 No Charge Glucose Meter Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch 2 How to flush belly bloat Cut a bit of belly bloat each day by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com A lot of factors do have influence on the ideal blood sugar level. While your blood sugar might be too low or too hight for a normal blood sugar, factors like exercising or eating do have impact on the ideal blood sugar level Do you want a more detailed report? Please select accordingly: My blood sugar was tested... 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 Here is 1 carb you must avoid if you struggle with weight gain. HealthPlus50 General information about High blood sugar (Hyperglycemia) Hyperglycemia, which is more commonly known as high blood sugar, occurs when the body is incapable of shuttling glucose out of the bloodstream so it can be transferred to cells for use as energy. In most cases, this condition is only a problem for diabetic individuals because these people suffer from dysfunction of insulin, the hormone used by the body for regulating blood sugar levels. Symptoms of high blood sugar Symptoms of hyperglycemia usually take several weeks to develop and can involve: Dry mouth and an unusual degree of thirst, which prompts the person to drink more water than normal. This condition is called polydipsia. Polyuria, which refers to an increased frequency of urination, particularly during nighttime. Polyphagia, which is an increase in both appetite and food consumption. Irritability Fatigue More serious symp Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Doctors Overlook Leading Cause Of Premature Death

Diabetes is defined as a disease in which a person has high blood sugar. The problem is that physicians are failing to determine how low blood glucose needs to be to protect against dreaded diabetic complications. In a series of published studies, the definition of what constitutes diabetes, (or said differently, a person with high blood sugar) is about to be turned upside down. This is not a trivial matter. The term "diabetic complications" encompasses the most common diseases of aging, ranging from kidney failure1-3 and blindness,4-6 to heart disease,7-12 stroke,13,14 neuropathy,15,16 and even cancer.17-22 This means that most degenerative disease can be traced back to undiagnosed glucose control problems, which we assert will soon become the new definition of diabetes. High blood sugar appears to be the leading killer today, yet the medical mainstream is not properly diagnosing or treating it. The tragic result is an epidemic of diabetic complications that cripple and kill millions of Americans because simple steps are not being taken to suppress after-meal glucose spikes. As you are about to learn, it is not just elevated fasting glucose that creates diabetic complications. Excess after-meal glucose surges have turned into a silent diabetes plague, thus mandating new steps be taken to protect against what may be the leading cause of premature death. Fasting Glucose Is a Delayed Marker of Diabetes When people take blood tests to measure glucose levels, they are asked to fast for 8 to 12 hours. Doctors ask for this 8-12 hour fast because they want a consistent baseline to measure glucose and lipids in comparison with the general population. There is one problem with this. A person who suffers from dangerously high blood sugar several hours following a typical meal may Continue reading >>

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