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Is Barnyard Millet Good For Diabetics?

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

Food, an energy reservoir often becomes a hurdle for people living with diabetes who have to consciously eat the right food to keep their blood sugar in check. Refined carbohydrate or sugar rich foods such as Bread, Donuts and tetra pack juices act as culprits whereas fibre and protein rich foods such as whole grains, pulses, oats, barley , millets, nuts , milk, raw veggies and fruits act as saviours. There are studies been done globally to find balanced diet, that can be recommended for diabetics, which is not only tasty but also gives energy boost. One such study reveals, Millets which are natural source of fibre, protein, calcium, magnesium, help control the blood sugar spike. Just replacing refined grains with these tiny but mighty Millets, open a whole new array of diet options for people living with diabetes. Pearl Millet (Bajra), Finger Millet (Ragi), Sorghum (Jowar), Little Millet (Varai, Sanwa) are millets that are easily available locally. Each of them supplements the diet with minerals, fibres, proteins and phytochemicals - the combination of which helps beat diabetes. Besides these nutrients, a non-nutrient yet beneficial component of millet is the fibre in it. Fibre is an indigestible part of food and helps in slow release of sugar into the blood after the breakdown of food, along with improving of insulin sensitivity ie, your body cells respond to the insulin and in turn use up the sugar released into the blood, thereby controlling blood sugar levels. Similar to fibre, proteins also help in controlled and slow release of sugar into the blood. Millets being a rich source of protein and fibre handle the sugar load in body more efficiently. Phytochemicals, found in the bran layers of millet are the non nutrient component commonly found in plant based food. It Continue reading >>

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Here Is Why Millet Is A Miracle Food For Diabetics

Since learning that two slices of wheat bread can raise blood sugar levels higher than a candy bar, many diabetics tend to avoid it. In fact, in order to stay ahead of the blood-sugar game that many diabetics have to play, many are discovering that their bodies actually feel better when they’re not eating wheat. While this can be due to an additional underlying viral condition that comes along with their disease, the point remains that it’s another food they can’t eat and this can become frustrating. While already feeling limited in their dietary intake, and like they’re left without a choice in the world after avoiding wheat, many diabetics feel hopeless that there are alternatives. This in turn can raise their stress levels and actually raise their blood sugar along with it. The Name Of The Game Is Keeping The Blood Sugar Down Regulating blood sugar levels is what’s on every diabetics mind, and it can make mealtimes stressful. Eating shouldn’t be stressful. In an attempt to figure out what they can eat, diabetics have finally found magic in Millet. Millet is as versatile as rice, without the blood sugar surge. A study done in India comparing the glycemic index of rice dosa (a type of pancake made from a fermented batter that is somewhat similar to a crepe) to millet dosas, has shown to have promising health benefits for diabetics when it comes to blood sugar levels. Advertisement The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients who have type-2 diabetes, in order to “estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of their meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. The participants aged between thirty-five a Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index And Significance Of Barnyard Millet (echinochloa Frumentacae) In Type Ii Diabetics

Glycemic Index And Significance Of Barnyard Millet (echinochloa Frumentacae) In Type Ii Diabetics

This study focused on developing nutritious 3D-printed snacks from composite flour prepared from barnyard millet, green gram, fried gram, and ajwain seeds. The work evaluated extrusion printability of the high-fibre, high-protein composite flour. Optimised process parameters that gave best resolution and stability are nozzle diameter of 0.84 mm, nozzle height of 0.63 mm, printing speed of 2400 mm/min, extruder motor speed of 300 rpm, and movement speed of X/Y and Z axis of 6000 mm/min and 1000 mm/min, respectively. 3D-printed objects were post-processed by deep frying, hot-air drying followed by deep frying and microwave drying. With proximate analysis of the post-processed 3D-printed foods, we conclude that microwave drying could better retain nutrients, while ensuring minimal changes in colour and textural properties, as compared with other post-processing methods. All post-processed samples were acceptable in terms of sensory attributes; the developed snack has the potential to be commercialised. This work explains the successful development of nutritious 3D-printed snacks from diverse plant sources, importantly, with emphasis on the development of high-fibre foods with good consumer acceptance. In the 21st century, climate changes, water scarcity, increasing world population, rising food prices, and other socioeconomic impacts are expected to generate a great threat to agriculture and food security worldwide, especially for the poorest people who live in arid and subarid regions. These impacts present a challenge to scientists and nutritionists to investigate the possibilities of producing, processing, and utilizing other potential food sources to end hunger and poverty. Cereal grains are the most important source of the world's food and have a significant role in Continue reading >>

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What makes millets a super food for diabetics Millets are not just bird seed, but the secret to enjoying your grains while staying gluten free, keeping your blood sugar low and accelerating weight loss Millets are tiny seeds of the grass family that originated in Africa and Asia. Consumed traditionally in South India, these easy to cook goodies are nutritious, cultivated with less water, are pest resistant and therefore environment friendly. They come at a marginally higher expense but are richer in protein, fat, fibre and other nutrients than grains like wheat and rice. Millets are a powerhouse of the following nutrients: Fibre offers satiety therefore is a good choice to manage blood sugars and diabetes Beta-glucan [soluble fibre] lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Resistant starch helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut Bran is not digested and aids easy bowel movement preventing constipation Millets contain higher amounts of protein in comparison to rice and wheat. Typically grains lack an essential amino acid called lysine. Finger and foxtail millet contains more lysine. High protein content increases serotonin which is a feel good factor and it helps to induce sleep B vitamins, B3, B6, and folic acid makes one feel energetic Magnesium is an anti-stress mineral and together with potassium helps to reduce blood pressure and boosts heart health Calcium and phosphorus are good for bone health, however the absorption of calcium may be not be optimal due to the presence of anti-nutrients like phytates, phenols, enzyme inhibitors and tanins Iron is vital for stamina and its absorption in finger millet [ragi] can be enhanced by malting. Most of the common food items prepared with rice or wheat can be replaced with millets either partly or whole. Millets contain Continue reading >>

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millets in ones diet can help prevent diabetes, says Dr. Vijay Viswanathan. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Prolonged exposure to diabetes damages important organs like the eye, the kidney, the heart and nerves, as the result of damage to small blood vessels. Heredity, obesity, stress, rich diet, and lack of physical activity are some of the causes for diabetes. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problems. Physical activity/exercise helps the muscles convert glucose to energy. But there is a risk of developing hypoglycemia. Shifting to a healthy diet and a brisk walk of more than five hours a week helps keep blood glucose level normal. As far as diet is concerned, millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet (Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil: Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi: Bajra, Tamil: Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi: Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua; Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets ar Continue reading >>

Add Millets To Your Diet And Say No To Diabetes

Add Millets To Your Diet And Say No To Diabetes

Home / Millets , Organic Foods , Organic Healthy Foods /Add Millets to your Diet and Say No to Diabetes Add Millets to your Diet and Say No to Diabetes Millets , Organic Foods , Organic Healthy Foods Imagine the pain of saying no to tetra pack juices and donuts for diabetic patients. However, this does not indicate the end of their world as they can still enjoy living on milk, fruits, raw veggies, oats, barley and more. But what health experts have found really worth mentioning is the importance of consuming millets. What they ensure are a balanced diet, energy boosting capabilities, and blood sugar control. Millets are rich in protein, fiber, magnesium, and calcium that help in controlling blood sugar to a good extent. Moreover, these gluten-free grains can be a perfect addition to ones diet to keep diabetes at bay. Also, whats best about millets is that they supplement the diet with phytochemicals and minerals that combine to beat diabetes. Fiber on the other hand aids in releasing sugar slowly into the blood after the breakdown of food. Apart from this, insulin sensitivity is improved where the sugar released into the blood is used up, keeping the blood sugar controlled. Now lets study about the different types of millets and their roles in controlling diabetes: Finger Millet Rich in calcium, this brown colored millet is also known as Nachni or Ragi. Moreover, calcium regulates the release of the hormone insulin. This helps in managing the level of blood sugar. However, you must avoid ragi bread, ragi biscuits or ragi laddoo as they contain unwanted sugar, fats, and wheat flour. Pearl Millet Being a rich source of iron, Pearl millet or Bajra plays a key role in controlling diabetes. As people with iron deficiency fall prey to diabetes, pearl millet can be quite help Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Millet For Diabetes Mellitus

Home / Diet & Nutrition / Best Millet for Diabetes Mellitus Diabets mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problem. Role of millets in controlling diabetes mellitus Millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet(Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil:Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi:Bajra, Tamil:Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi; Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua: Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets are non-gluten, non-acid forming food and are high in protein, fiber, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, and zinc. They not only help prevent diabetes but also other complications like heart disease and cancer. Millets are also relatively rich in B vitamins (especially niacin, B6 and folicacid) and phosphorus. Among the millets, pearl millet (Bajra) has the highest content of macro nutrients and micro nutrients such as iron, zinc , magnesium, phosphorus, folicacid and riboflavin. Finger m Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Diabetes In South Asia

Nutrition And Diabetes In South Asia

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube. Misra A, Tandon N, Ebrahim S, Sattar N, Alam D, Shrivastava U, et al. Diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic kidney disease in South Asia: current status and future directions. BMJ. 2017;11:j1420. Yakoob MY, Micha R, Khatibzadeh S, Singh GM, Shi P, Ahsan H, et al. Impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiovascular and diabetes mortality in South Asia: analysis from the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study. Am J Public Health. 2016;106:211325. Jayawardena R, Ranasinghe P, Wijayabandara M, Hills AP, Misra A. Nutrition transition and obesity among teenagers and young adults in South Asia. Curr Diabetes Rev. 2017;13:44451. Malik VS, Popkin BM, Bray GA, Desprs J-P, Hu FB. Sugar sweetened beverages, obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. Circulation. 2010;121:135664. WHO. Reducing consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages to reduce the risk of childhood overweight and obesity. WHO. . Accessed 28 Feb 2018. Katzmarzyk PT, Broyles ST, Champagne CM, Chaput J-P, Fogelholm M, Hu G, et al. Relationship between soft drink consumption and obesity in 911 years old children in a multi-national study. Nutrients. 2016;8. . Mozaffarian D, Katan MB, Ascherio A, Stampfer MJ, Willett WC. Trans fatty acids and cardiovascular disease. N Engl J Med. 2006;354:160113. Guess N,Perreault L,Kerege A,Strauss A,Bergman BC, Dietary fatty acids differentially associate with fasting Versus 2-hour glucose homeostasis: implications for the management of subtypes of prediabetes. PLOS ONE. 2016;11:e0150148 Colles SL, Singh S, Kohli C, Mithal A. Dietary beliefs and eating patterns influence metabolic health in type 2 diabetes: a clinic-based study in urban North India. Indian J Endocrinol Metab. 2013;17:106672. Bhardwaj S Continue reading >>

Barnyard Millet : The Rice For Diabetic Patients

Barnyard Millet : The Rice For Diabetic Patients

The Barnyard millet (Echinochloa frumantacea) is a wild seed and not a grain, mainly grown in the hilly areas of Uttaranchal, India. This is the fastest growing crop, which can produce ripe grains within 45 days from the sowing time under optimal weather conditions. The other names of barnyard are shyama in Bengali, moraiyo in Gujarati, sanwa in Hindi, oodalu in Kannada, kuthiraivolly in Tamil and udalu in Telugu. These seeds have a hard cellulosic husk layer that humans cannot digest. After the removal of the husk layer the respective millets rice is attained. Small seeds of are processed on groats. The barnyard millet is tiny, white, round grain, bigger in size than semolina (rawa) and smaller than sago (sabudana). The barnyard is a wholesome grain over common cereal grains like rice, wheat. It is highly economical and makes a tasteful food for all age groups. The millet is natures gift to the modern diet and sedentary activities that can lead to lifestyle disorders. A serving of barnyard millets (25g, raw) gives 75 calories and 1.5g of protein. Barnyard millet is a good source of highly digestible protein and at the same time is least caloric dense compared to all other cereals. It is a grain which makes one feel light and energetic after consumption. It is an excellent source of dietary fiber with a good amount of both soluble and insoluble fractions. The grain encompasses the highest amount of fiber in comparison to other grains. Millets with a serve providing 2.4 grams of fiber. According to a study published in the Journal of Food Science and Technology, the dietary fiber content of barnyard millet was high (12.6%) including soluble (4.2%) and insoluble (8.4%) fractions. The high fiber content helps in preventing constipation, excess gas, bloating and cramping. Continue reading >>

Millet For Diabetes: Benefits, Nutritional Content, And More

Millet For Diabetes: Benefits, Nutritional Content, And More

Diabetes is a condition where the body either doesnt produce enough insulin or doesnt efficiently use insulin. As a result, the body cant properly process foods for energy. This can increase your blood glucose level, or blood sugar, and lead to dangerous complications if left untreated. Since diabetes affects blood sugar , theres a belief that people with diabetes cant eat sugar or carbohydrates like millet. But while its true that people living with diabetes may have to be more aware of their carb intake to manage their blood sugar, good carbohydrates (particularly complex carbs ) can also help manage diabetes symptoms. Millet, and other whole grain carbohydrates, are loaded with fiber , minerals, and vitamins. They should be included in your diet if you have diabetes. Heres a look at why millet is good for people with diabetes, as well as tips for eating healthy with this condition. Millet is a group of small-seeded grains resembling small pearls. In the United States, some people havent heard of millet, yet its a staple in many parts of the world. Its commonly included in Indian and African dishes. , 300 participants with type 2 diabetes were evaluated after eating foxtail millet for 90 days. The study evaluated millets effect on: After the 90 days, researchers found that millet lowered the groups hemoglobin A1c level by 19.14 percent. A1C is a measurement of your average blood sugar level over 3 months. Fasting glucose was lowered by 13.5 percent, cholesterol by 13.25 percent, and triglycerides by 13.51 percent. These results have led researchers to believe that an intake of millet could have a positive effect on glycemic control and improve cardiovascular risk factors. People living with diabetes also need to be familiar with the glycemic index (GI) and know the G Continue reading >>

How To Control Diabetes With Vitamin-rich Varagu (kodo Millet) Vermicelli

How To Control Diabetes With Vitamin-rich Varagu (kodo Millet) Vermicelli

How to control Diabetes with Vitamin-Rich Varagu (Kodo Millet) Vermicelli | Category: Health , Millets , Semia , Vermicelli Diabetes has become a highly problematic and increasingly prevalent disease worldwide. Lifestyle and dietary regulation can have a great influence on life quality for those that suffer from diabetes. Millet has been shown to be potentially beneficial in the management of diabetes. Because they are digested more slowly than refined grains, which have been stripped of the germ and bran that cover the starchy endosperm, Millets maintain a lower glucose and insulin response in the body than refined grains. Regular consumption of millets helps avoid dangerous increase in blood sugar levels, which leads to numerous complications. The high fibre content of millet is responsible for slowing down the release of sugar in the blood stream, in other words, it slows down digestion which results in the distribution of sugar at a more even pace. It is prescribed by diabetologists because of its ability to minimize the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. How to Manage Diabetes with Kodo (Varagu) Millet Kodo Millet is called Kodra in Hindi, Varagu in Tamil, Harka in Kannada, Arikelu in Telugu, and Koovaragu in Malayalam. Kodo Millet closely resembles rice. Kodo Millets are concentrated sources of energy. They are gluten-free, rich in vitamins, iron, magnesium, Zinc, protein, calcium, fibre, and minerals. Diet constituents play a major part in controlling diabetes.Its consumption helps in reducing risk factors for CVD, including BMI, insulin sensitivity, and type 2 diabetes. Studies have demonstrated that a 2- or 3-serving-per-day increase in Kodo Millet consumption is associated with decrease in type 2 diabetes. The low glycemic index in Kodo mill Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

Barnyard Millet Idli | Diabetic Friendly Recipe

Barnyard Millet Idli | Diabetic Friendly Recipe

Millets, tiny cereals of goodness has been in my food life since a year. I tried to cook them in most amazing and delicious form of breakfast and was super successful. My most staple food of the morning=> dosa, idli, upma, pongal can even incorporate these grains which makes me more than happy. (Warm welcome to Barnyard millet idli !!). But what disappoints me is lack of availability of millets in most supermarkets of UAE. For me, I have to drive to the grocery shop which is bit out of the way and sometimes I end up to see “Out of Stock” board hanging at the millet counter there. So on some full moon day with best chance of luck, my trip to grocery shop ends happily with loads millet packets of all kind. I would be happy like a kid holding some unusual, rare chocolate in it’s hand. For those of you who live in India, buying millets isn’t going to be difficult. It’s likely to be available in most grocery shops and super markets. Ease of access to most favorite groceries is what makes our cooking life simple and straight forward. Otherwise the food love and cooking interest takes back seat. Barnyard millet idli has everything basic like it’s counterpart. Lentils, fenugreek seeds and millet (as a replacement to rice). The key step in making really soft idli is grinding the lentils to perfection. When you grind the pre-soaked black gram lentils the batter should be airy, fluffy and light. Not runny!! When rice is being replaced by millets in breakfast like this dosa and idli, it becomes diabetic friendly. So all members of the family under a roof can share and enjoy the same food with same love and affection. Food really connects family and roots become strong and solid. Soak split black gram lentils and fenugreek seeds together in enough water for about 3 hours Continue reading >>

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millet can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images) From a humble crop that once satiated the poor to the base of a gourmet meal for the health conscious, millets have made a comeback. While flavours of the grain may vary to suit modern palates, a doctor's ideal recipe is still traditional. A research paper has documented this formula and tracked its impact on people with diabetes. The study, undertaken by M V Hospital for Diabetes , found that replacing rice based dosas with ones made of foxtail millet (Thinai) can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients in Chennai diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. "We wanted to estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of the meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. A WHO-ICMR study based on non-communicable diseases' risk factor surveillance showed that the prevalence of diabetes is 10.4% of the population. In summers, diabetes-related emergencies spike by 25%, with many reporting exhaustion and dehydration. The participants surveyed, aged between 35 and 55, were divided into two groups. While one group was given rice dosa for breakfast on one day, the others ate dosas made of millets. Two days later, the plates were swapped be tween the groups. On both days, researchers first measured their fasting blood glucose levels and one and a half hours after breakfast, their levels again.While the glycaemic Continue reading >>

Processed Finger Millet Can Increase Blood Sugar Levels

Processed Finger Millet Can Increase Blood Sugar Levels

Processed finger millet can increase blood sugar levels Although millets are high in fibre, processed millets can increase blood sugar levels as they have a high Glycemic Index The Glycemic Index (GI) of upma made from processed finger millet is close to the GI of polished white rice, according to a scientist who is part of a study on finger millets, funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research.Glycemic Index measures how food raises blood glucose levels, i.e the more the GI the more the sugar levels in your blood. The finding was sharedduring a three day discussion on millets, called 'Dialogue on Millets, Monsoon and Market in Chennai. Sudha Vasudevan, senior scientist, Madras Diabetes Research Foundation and one of the panelists said that the mean value of GI of upma made from decorticated or processed finger millet (husk is removed from the grain) was high at 87, similar to the GI of white polished rice. Millets are recommended to diabetics as they are rich in fibre and have low GI. Vasudev also said that the study showed thatGI of finger millet flakes (also processed) was 82.3. Vasudevan said that there are gaps in research on processed or value added products of millets and more studies need to be conducted to understand how millets get digested and absorbed. However, she added that a conclusion was difficult to arrive at since methods to calculate GI were recently standardised. Organised by the M S Swaminathan Research Foundation (MSSRF), the discussion concluded that millets should be a part of a balanced diet and more research on processed millet products need to take place to fill the scientific gaps. The chairperson for the panel and a scientist, Thingnganing Longvah said, The lack of dietary diversity has led to current problems regarding nutritional sec Continue reading >>

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