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Is Anxiety A Symptom Of Diabetes?

How To Deal With Hypoglycemia Anxiety

How To Deal With Hypoglycemia Anxiety

I have strong memories of hypoglycemia anxiety from my early days of living with Type 1 diabetes. I would wake up anxious throughout the night. I was dreaming. I had always hated math, but after weeks of constant carb counting, recording my blood glucose levels, and noting my insulin doses, I had numbers in my head all night. That made me anxious, and so did the fear of hypoglycemia. Sometimes early in the morning, my blood sugar would drop low, making me shaky and sweaty. Those are the symptoms of a panic attack, but also of low blood sugar. Every day people with diabetes (PWD) who use insulin risk hypoglycemia (a low blood sugar level). Each time they check their blood glucose, PWD have to examine the reading and decide how to proceed. We are balancing the need to maintain good blood glucose control with the fear of hypoglycemia. This fear is well founded. Hypoglycemia is not just unpleasant and embarrassing- it can be fatal. I counsel people with Type 1 diabetes, and one of the most stressful parts of diabetes for many people is the experience of being hypoglycemic. I have met a number of people who let their blood sugar levels run high in order to have a break from the lows. Many of them live with substantial guilt about this coping strategy. They often worry about the long-term effects of their elevated blood glucose levels. The fact that they choose the guilt and worry over the risk of going low shows how intensely they fear hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia anxiety can diminish their quality of life, and often results in an ongoing elevated blood glucose level that causes other health issues. However, we can treat hypoglycemia anxiety and find the courage and motivation to maintain good blood glucose control. There are effective methods to reduce and manage anxiety. Cog Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

What's the connection between diabetes and depression? How can I cope if I have both? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes — either type 1 or type 2 — you have an increased risk of developing depression. And if you're depressed, you may have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news is that diabetes and depression can be treated together. And effectively managing one can have a positive effect on the other. How they're related Though the relationship between diabetes and depression isn't fully understood: The rigors of managing diabetes can be stressful and lead to symptoms of depression. Diabetes can cause complications and health problems that may worsen symptoms of depression. Depression can lead to poor lifestyle decisions, such as unhealthy eating, less exercise, smoking and weight gain — all of which are risk factors for diabetes. Depression affects your ability to perform tasks, communicate and think clearly. This can interfere with your ability to successfully manage diabetes. Managing the two conditions together Diabetes self-management programs. Diabetes programs that focus on behavior have been successful in helping people improve their metabolic control, increase fitness levels, and manage weight loss and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. They can also help improve your sense of well-being and quality of life. Psychotherapy. Similarly, participants in psychotherapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy, have reported improvements in depression, which has resulted in better diabetes management. Medications and lifestyle changes. Medications — for both diabetes and depression — and lifestyle changes, including different types of therapy coupled with regular exercise, can improve both conditions. C Continue reading >>

Struggles With Panic Attacks

Struggles With Panic Attacks

First, I want to address a question that Envoy posted on my blog entry from two weeks ago. Envoy asked if I thought that depression was more common in people who have diabetes. The first answer is that I have always believed it is more common, and research has also indicated that it’s twice as likely to occur in people who have diabetes. That is part of the reason I suggest a yearly mental health checkup in conjunction with your annual physical. The percentage of people with diabetes who experience depression is quite significant, in the range of 20%. Hopefully, your health-care professional asks you questions about your moods, energy level, activities, sleep, and connections with other people at appointments. An open discussion of this type can give him or her enough information to begin an assessment for depression. It makes sense that controlling diabetes would be made more difficult if depression is left untreated. However, fewer than 25% of cases of depression in people with diabetes are recognized and treated appropriately. We clearly have a lot of work to do in improving mental health care for people with diabetes. Another mental health issue that has been shown to interfere with people’s diabetes control is panic disorder. Panic disorder is characterized by unpredictable, excessive fear or terror accompanied by a number of physical symptoms. Symptoms may include pounding heart, palpitations, sweating, difficulty breathing, numbness or tingling sensations, chest pain, dizziness, nausea, trembling or shaking, and chills or hot flashes. Many of these are similar to symptoms of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, and they could also resemble a heart attack. Therefore, a person may overreact (by visiting the emergency room, for example) or, thinking that his symp Continue reading >>

The Shocking Diabetes Trigger That Can Strike Anyone

The Shocking Diabetes Trigger That Can Strike Anyone

It’s the opposite of what most people worry about… Everyone knows about high blood sugar and the devastating effects it can have on one’s health and longevity. But low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can be just as dangerous—and it does not get nearly the attention that it should. Simply put, hypoglycemia occurs when the body does not have enough glucose to use as fuel. It most commonly affects people with type 2 diabetes who take medication that sometimes works too well, resulting in low blood sugar. Who gets overlooked: In other people, hypoglycemia can be a precursor to diabetes that is often downplayed by doctors and/or missed by tests. Having low blood sugar might even make you think that you are far from having diabetes…when, in fact, the opposite is true. Hypoglycemia can also be an underlying cause of anxiety that gets mistakenly treated with psychiatric drugs rather than the simple steps (see below) that can stabilize blood sugar levels. That’s why anyone who seems to be suffering from an anxiety disorder needs to be seen by a doctor who takes a complete medical history and orders blood tests. When a patient comes to me complaining of anxiety, hypoglycemia is one of the first things I test for. What’s the link between hypoglycemia and anxiety? A sudden drop in blood sugar deprives the brain of oxygen. This, in turn, causes the adrenal glands to release adrenaline, the “emergency” hormone, which may lead to agitation, or anxiety, as the body’s fight-or-flight mechanism kicks in. THE DANGERS OF HYPOGLYCEMIA Hypoglycemia has sometimes been called carbohydrate intolerance, because the body’s insulin-releasing mechanism is impaired in a manner similar to what occurs in diabetics. In people without diabetes, hypoglycemia is usually the result of eati Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms - Social Anxiety Forum

Diabetes Symptoms - Social Anxiety Forum

Originally Posted by ManOnTheMOON View Post Have you been drinking alot of pop or sugar. If so you might have insulin resistance. I used to drink alot as a teenager. But when my mom got diabetes a few years ago, I drink it once in a while. All those symptoms can be attributed to anxiety disorder. I'm also a type 1 diabetic. Those are pretty much the problems I had when I was diagnosed, but like the poster above stated, they were VERY severe. Like I had to drink GALLONS of liquid every day, I lost about 25 pounds in 2 weeks, I lived in the bathroom. As my condition worsened, my vision was a COMPLETE blur, like almost completely blind, and I couldn't even make it up stairs without collapsing. I do not recall having itchy skin, but it was a long time ago. By the time I finally went to the hospital I couldn't even walk. For me it was constant...so the 'happens mainly on weekdays while you work' might suggest that it is something else. Do you have a high-stress job that boosts your anxiety? My blood sugar level was well over 700 and I had a DEADLY amount of ketones in my urine. So if it is diabetes, the blood and urine tests would have picked it up. If you suffer from General Anxiety Disorder, it is probably just a result of that, which would explain why others here have had the same symptoms. I know GAD causes excessive thirst, which would explain the excessive urination. Fatigue, blurred vision, and itchy skin are also symptoms. Wow! thats horrible. How long were you experiencing it befor you went to the hospital? I'm going to do some research on GAD. Thanks Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Patients With Depression, Anxiety Symptoms At Higher Risk Of Mortality

Diabetes Patients With Depression, Anxiety Symptoms At Higher Risk Of Mortality

When people with diabetes experience symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, their risk of mortality increases-particularly for men with only depressive symptoms. When people with diabetes experience symptoms of depression and/or anxiety, their risk of mortality increases—particularly for men with only depressive symptoms. Previous research has shown that depression is 5 times more prevalent in people with diabetes and is linked to a higher risk of death, but there have been few studies of how comorbid anxiety symptoms are potentially associated with mortality in diabetics. A group of researchers set out to assess the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes and symptoms of depression or anxiety. Their findings were published in Diabetes Care. The study analyzed health survey responses from more than 64,000 adults in Norway. The primary dependent variables were type 2 diabetes status and levels of 2 affective symptoms, anxiety and depression, as determined by self-reported assessment tools. Data on age, sex, education, lifestyle factors, comorbid conditions, and other covariates were also collected. Over the 18-year study period, about 1 in 5 of the individuals without diabetes died, while two-thirds of the diabetes group died. Compared with the reference group without diabetes and without any symptoms of depression and anxiety, the risk of death increased, from smallest to largest in magnitude, for those with any affective symptoms, those with diabetes only at baseline, and those with affective symptoms comorbid with diabetes. These patterns were observed for exposure to either affective symptom or a combination of both depression and anxiety symptoms. Of the types of affective symptoms, depression symptoms were associated with the largest increase in the hazard Continue reading >>

Anxiety Symptoms In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Association With Blood Glucose Monitoring And Glycemic Control

Anxiety Symptoms In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes: Association With Blood Glucose Monitoring And Glycemic Control

Go to: Objective To examine the prevalence of anxiety symptoms and their association with blood glucose monitoring (BGM) and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods 276 adolescents and their caregivers completed measures of anxiety symptoms. Adolescents completed a measure of depressive symptoms. Demographic and family characteristics were obtained from caregiver report. Diabetes duration, regimen type, BGM frequency, and glycemic control were also collected. Results Trait anxiety symptoms that suggest further clinical assessment is needed were present in 17% of adolescents; the rate was 13% for state anxiety symptoms. Higher levels of state anxiety symptoms were associated with less frequent BGM F(14, 261) = 6.35, p < .0001, R2 = .25, and suboptimal glycemic control, F(15, 260) = 7.97, p < .0001, R2 = .32. State anxiety symptoms were correlates of BGM frequency and glycemic control independent of depressive symptoms. Conclusions State anxiety symptoms are associated with less frequent BGM and suboptimal glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of problematic psychological functioning. Much of the work in this area has focused on depression (Grey, Whittemore, & Tamborlane, 2002; Hood et al., 2006; Kovacs, Obrosky, Goldston, & Drash, 1997; Whittemore et al., 2002) and highlights that up to 20% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes experience elevated levels of depressive symptoms; a rate two to three times that found in the general adolescent population (Lewinsohn, Clarke, Seeley, & Rohde, 1994). Depressive symptoms have been linked to poorer disease management and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (Helgeson, Siminerio, Escobar, & Becker, 2008; La Greca, Swales, Kle Continue reading >>

Stress And Type 1 Diabetes

Stress And Type 1 Diabetes

Stress can be a challenge to deal with, and when you have type 1 diabetes, coping with it is even more important because of the serious effect it can have on your health. Stress is your physical and emotional reaction to difficult situations. Stress-inducing situations can include positive events, such as the birth of a baby, and negative ones, like divorce. In most people, stress can cause symptoms like headaches, upset stomach, fatigue, and anxiety. And in people with type 1 diabetes, stress can also have yet another unwanted effect: elevated blood sugar. The blood sugar of type 1 diabetics can increase when they’re stressed because of the production of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol. In most people, these hormones help improve the body’s stress response by prompting the liver to release more glucose, or blood sugar, for additional energy. For diabetics, however, this extra glucose can result in a dangerously high blood sugar level. There are no hard and fast rules on how much to increase your insulin when you’re stressed, so the best thing to do is keep a closer eye on yourself. When you’re in a stressful situation, check your blood sugar levels more frequently. You may even want to write down your stress level on a scale of 1 to 10, along with your glucose level, every time you test. This can help you gauge what effect, if any, stress has on your blood sugar. Stress Relief Strategies The best way to avoid stress-induced blood sugar problems is, of course, to prevent the stress in the first place. Try reducing your exposure to controllable stressors, like traffic jams, by avoiding them whenever you can. If you feel overwhelmed by your personal responsibilities, it might be wise to reduce the time you spend on volunteer work or other non-essential Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Diabetes And Psychiatric Disorders

Patterns of co-occurrence of diabetes and psychiatric disorders Comorbidity of diabetes and psychiatric disorders can present in different patterns. First, the two can present as independent conditions with no apparent direct connection. In such a scenario both are outcome of independent and parallel pathogenic pathways. Second, the course of diabetes can be complicated by emergence of psychiatric disorders. In such cases diabetes contributes to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Various biological and psychological factors mediate the emergence of psychiatric disorders in such context. Third, certain psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia act as significant independent risk factors for development of diabetes. Fourth, there could be an overlap between the clinical presentation of hypoglycemic and ketoacidosis episodes and conditions such as panic attacks. Fifth, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes could emerge as a side effect of the medications used for psychiatric disorders. Treatment of psychiatric disorders could influence diabetes care in other ways also as discussed in subsequent sections [Box 1]. Diabetes and psychiatric disorders interact in other ways as well. Certain substances of abuse such as tobacco and alcohol can alter the pharmacokinetics of the oral hypoglycemic agents. Moreover, the presence of a comorbid psychiatric disorder like depression could interfere with the management of diabetes by influencing treatment adherence. Similarly certain disorders such as phobia of needles and injections can present difficulties with investigations and treatment processes such as blood glucose testing and insulin injection. Also patients with psychiatric disorders are less likely to seek treatment. Such delays would postpone detection Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anxiety

Diabetes And Anxiety

Tweet Anxiety can be defined as a fear-based mental state, normally felt as a discomforting emotional state accompanied with physical sensations in the body. Anxiety based mental disorders (i.e. people diagnosed with SAD or GAD) are people who appear anxious about almost everything. This has a detrimental effect on their ability to carry out normal day to day activities. What are the symptoms of anxiety? Symptoms include excessive worry and unnecessary anxiety for numerous activities with symptoms being present and continuous for a minimum of 6 months. Anxiety is difficult to control and is accompanied by somatic symptoms including: Shaking Heart palpitations Excessive perspiration Crying Often it will be a state of mind that is reached after years of dealing with the condition. People diagnosed with diabetes are approximately 20% more likely to suffer from anxiety than those without diabetes. [33] What are the causes of anxiety? Being diagnosed with diabetes can instigate anxiety in a number of ways. People with diabetes may potentially be anxious about how their condition will be perceived by others including friends, family and work colleagues. Anxiety may also arise over what could happen if they were experience a hypo while driving or whilst looking after their children. Excessive worrying can lead to social anxiety. Symptoms of social anxiety include Being fearful of leaving the house or place of comfort Anxiety of being around people, known or strangers Avoidance of social interaction Why might I be anxious? People diagnosed with diabetes may be anxious about the long term implications of their condition. Greater than 70%, of diabetics could develop macrovascular conditions including heart attack and stroke. Furthermore, between 5% and 10% are reported to experie Continue reading >>

Prevalence And Determinants Of Depressive And Anxiety Symptoms In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes In China: A Cross-sectional Study

Prevalence And Determinants Of Depressive And Anxiety Symptoms In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes In China: A Cross-sectional Study

Objectives To evaluate the prevalence and determinants of anxiety and depression and to assess their impact on glycaemic control in participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Participants 893 Chinese men and women aged 18–84 years who fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Methods People with type 2 diabetes completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety and Depression Scales. Demographic and physiological characteristics were recorded. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the combined effect of factors associated with anxiety and depression and to assess the effects of anxiety and depression on glycaemic control. Results The prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms was 56.1% and 43.6%, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that anxiety symptoms were associated with being woman, low income, chronic disease, depressive symptoms and poor sleep quality. Depressive symptoms were associated with being woman, older age, low education level, being single, diabetes complications, anxiety symptoms and poor sleep quality. Glycaemic control was not related to anxiety symptoms (OR=1.31, 95% CIs 0.94 to 1.67) or depressive symptoms (OR=1.23, 95% CI 0.85 to 1.63). A combination of depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms was associated with poor glycaemic control (relative excess risk due to interaction: 4.93, 95% CI 2.09 to 7.87; attributable proportion due to interaction: 0.27, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45). Conclusions There was a high prevalence of depressive and anxiety symptoms in this Chinese sample of participants, although depression and anxiety were not singly associated with glycaemic control. However, a combination of depressive and anxiety symptoms was negatively correlated with glycaemic control Continue reading >>

Anxiety

Anxiety

It’s normal to feel anxious or worried at times. Everyone does. In fact, a moderate amount of anxiety can be good. It helps you respond appropriately to real danger, and it can help motivate you to excel at work and at home. But if you often feel anxious without reason and your worries disrupt your daily life, you may have an anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorders cause excessive or unrealistic anxiety and worry about life circumstances, usually without a readily identifiable cause. Little is known about the relationship between diabetes and anxiety. Recent evidence suggests that the rate of anxiety disorders is elevated in people with type 1 diabetes. It is estimated that 14% of people with diabetes have generalized anxiety disorder. As many as 40% of people have at least some anxiety symptoms, and fear of hypoglycemia is not uncommon in those with diabetes. Anxiety disorders in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes may be associated with poor blood sugar control. Signs & symptoms of anxiety The signs and symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder can vary in combination or severity. They may include: Restlessness Feeling of being tense or on edge Feeling a lump in your throat Difficulty concentrating Fatigue Irritability Impatience Being easily distracted Muscle tension Trouble falling or staying asleep (insomnia) Excessive sweating Shortness of breath Stomach ache Diarrhea Headache Treatment of anxiety The two main treatments for anxiety disorders are medication (anti-anxiety drugs and/or anti-depressants) and psychotherapy ("talk therapy"), either alone or in combination. If you have difficulty controlling your worries, or if anxiety interferes with your daily life, speak with your doctor, diabetes health-care team or mental health professional. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Stress & Depression

Diabetes: Stress & Depression

How is diabetes linked to emotion? You have been challenged with the diagnosis of diabetes. Whether it is a new diagnosis or a longstanding one, living with this challenge can trigger a flood of emotions. Some of these emotions can include: Grief Anxiety Frustration Disappointment Stress These emotions are natural responses and are experienced by many people, especially when they are first diagnosed with diabetes. These emotions might also be experienced by someone managing diabetes over the long term. Emotional issues may make it harder to take care of you—to eat right, exercise, and rest—which in turn can affect blood sugar control. In addition, you might find yourself trying to reduce stress with unhealthy behaviors, which can contribute to diabetes complications. What is stress? Most people experience stress as an emotional or physical strain. It can result in worry, anxiety, and tension. Everyday events or changes in life may create stress. Stress affects everyone to some degree, but it may be more difficult to manage when people learn that they have diabetes. Symptoms of stress can include: Nervousness A fast heartbeat Rapid breathing Stomach upset Depression Stress can make it more difficult to control your diabetes as it may throw off your daily routine and can result in wear and tear on your body. Hormones from stress increase your blood pressure, raise your heart rate, and can cause blood sugar to rise. High blood sugar can make you feel down or tired. Low blood sugar may result in your feeling upset or nervous. How can I reduce stress in my life? There are many things you can do to reduce stress. The following are some suggestions: Take your medications as directed and eat healthy meals. Use relaxation techniques such as deep breathing. Get some exercise. Continue reading >>

Common Symptoms Of Dogs And Cats With Diabetes

Common Symptoms Of Dogs And Cats With Diabetes

Pets with diabetes look unkempt and act lethargic. Because they lose sugar in the urine, and sugar pulls water molecules out with it, they urinate excessively. This causes them to drink excessively. These activities, excessive urination (polyuria) and excessive drinking (polydipsia), are termed PUPD. Pets with diabetes lose weight and lose muscle mass. They may have a lower body temperature than normal pets. Additional symptoms of diabetes in dogs and cats may include: Excessive drinking & urination (PUPD) Loss of appetite Vomiting Dehydration Depression & lethargy Unkempt haircoat & dandruff Loss of muscles & weakness Weight loss Cataracts Weakness of the back legs Diabetes is diagnosed with blood and urine tests. The normal blood sugar (blood glucose) for dogs is 60-125 mg/dl; for cats, 70-150 mg/dl. Diabetes is diagnosed when blood sugars are consistently elevated a significant amount. For example, 220 mg/dl in a dog or 400mg/dl in a cat. If your pet is anxious when it visits the veterinarian, his or her blood sugar will naturally rise, and the elevation may be as high as the sugar levels in a diabetic pet. To prevent this stress-related elevation of blood sugar, find a veterinarian and a clinic that calms your pet. Or, use a veterinarian who makes house calls. Remember that one or two blood tests showing elevated blood sugar doesn't prove that your pet has diabetes. Blood sugar levels must be consistently elevated, or your pet must have urine tests showing ketones to prove they have diabetes. There are two ways urine tests indicate diabetes: sugar in the urine or ketones in the urine. Sugar gets into the urine if your pet's blood carries so much sugar that it exceeds the kidneys' ability to hold onto sugar. This is called exceeding the renal glucose threshold. A uri Continue reading >>

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