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Is 174 High Blood Sugar

Managing Blood Sugar

Managing Blood Sugar

Everyone’s experience with mealtime insulin is different, but there are some things you can look out for. Your Humalog dose will probably change over time. Your doctor gave you a starting dose, but most people need to increase their Humalog dose over time. When you track your blood sugar every day, you will probably see different numbers all the time. These variations in your blood sugar from day to day are normal. Your blood sugar varies based on stress, what you eat, other medications, exercise, and other factors. Don't be discouraged by changes in your blood sugar. With your doctor’s input, these variations may provide learning opportunities. Testing your blood sugar When using mealtime insulin like Humalog, you must test your blood sugar (glucose) regularly. For example, you may need to test before and after meals and at bedtime. Your doctor will tell you when and how often you should test. Why keep track? Keeping track of your blood sugar levels will help you and your doctor: Know if you’re meeting your blood sugar goals Learn how different foods affect your blood sugar levels Figure out how much insulin you should be taking Your doctor will tell you what to do if your blood sugar is high or low. If you take too much Humalog, your blood sugar may fall too low (hypoglycemia). If you forget to take your dose of Humalog, your blood sugar may go too high (hyperglycemia). Your blood sugar goals The American Diabetes Association recommends blood sugar goals for people with diabetes. These don’t apply to everyone, however, so work with your doctor to set the right goals for you. These goals are not applicable to pregnant women or children. These goals should be individualized. About high blood sugar One of the goals of your diabetes treatment is to keep blood suga Continue reading >>

Trajentamet® Tablets

Trajentamet® Tablets

This leaflet answers some common questions about Trajentamet. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. This leaflet was last updated on the date at the end of this leaflet. More recent information may be available. The latest Consumer Medicine Information is available from your pharmacist, doctor, or from www.medicines.org.au and may contain important information about the medicine and its use of which you should be aware. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Trajentamet against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. Trajentamet is used to lower blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus when diet plus exercise do not provide adequate blood sugar level control. Type 2 diabetes mellitus develops if the body does not make enough insulin or if the insulin that your body makes does not work as well as it should. It can also develop if the body produces too much glucagon. Insulin is a substance which helps to lower the level of sugar in your blood, especially after meals. Glucagon is another substance which triggers the production of sugar by the liver, causing the blood sugar to rise. The pancreas makes both of these substances. When the level of sugar builds up in your blood, this can cause damage to the body's cells and lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, circulation or kidneys. Trajentamet helps to improve the levels of insulin after a meal and lowers the amount of sugar made by your body. Lowering and controlling blood sugar may help prevent or delay compli Continue reading >>

What Is Considered A Normal Blood Sugar Range?

What Is Considered A Normal Blood Sugar Range?

Blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels are typically measured using a scale of grams per deciliter (g/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). This level will tend to fluctuate throughout the course of a day, with the lowest readings during periods of fasting and the highest coming shortly after a meal. The normal blood sugar range for a healthy person is about 83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L) to 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L). A healthy person's body is able to regulate blood glucose levels very tightly, resulting in a predictable normal blood sugar range. This means that blood glucose levels will tend to normalize fairly quickly, even though they can rise sharply after a meal, during what is known as the postprandial period. For a person without a blood glucose disorder, a fasting blood sugar level should be about 83 mg/dl (4.6 mmol/L). This means that his or her blood glucose should be at, or below, this level when he or she first wakes up in the morning. For many healthy people, the fasting blood glucose level is lower, at around 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/L). One to two hours after eating a meal, the blood sugar will typically spike. Within the normal blood sugar range, this shouldn't go any higher than 120 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/L). Many people experience an even lower postprandial blood sugar level, with readings of less than 100 mg/dl (5.5 mmol/L) two hours after eating. Meals that are higher in sugar or starch can affect the amount of the postprandial spike in blood glucose, or cause the increased level to last longer. There is some disagreement in the scientific community as to what exactly constitutes a normal blood sugar range, and what might be a precursor to developing diabetes later on. While a fasting blood glucose level of 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol) is often considered normal, it may also be an i Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Sugar

A Spoonful Of Sugar

Whenever I give a talk and make the statement that a normal blood sugar represents less than one teaspoon of sugar dissolved in the blood, I’m often met with scepticism. It really is true, however. Let’s go through the calculations so we can see exactly how this plays out. First, we need some basic measures. one liter (l)= 10 deciliters (dl) one gram (gm) = 1000 milligrams (mg) one teaspoon = 5 grams According to the American Diabetes Association the line between a healthy fasting blood sugar and a pre-diabetic fasting blood sugar is set at 100 mg/dl (pronounced 100 milligrams per deci-liter). A fasting blood sugar of between 100 mg/dl and 125 mg/dl earns a diagnosis of pre-diabetes, and a fasting blood sugar of over 125 mg/dl is diabetic. So how much sugar is 99 mg/dl, the highest fasting blood sugar you can have and not be diagnosed as pre-diabetic? Let’s figure it out. We know that a typical human has about 5 liters of blood, so we need to figure out how much sugar dissolved into this 5 liters of blood will give us a reading of 99 mg/dl. Since one liter contains 10 deciliters we multiply 99 mg/dl by 10, which gives us 990 mg, the amount of sugar in one liter. Multiply the 990 mg in one liter times 5, the number of liters of blood in the human body, and we have 4950 mg of sugar. If we divide the 4950 by 1000, the number of mg in a gram, we get 4.95 grams of sugar. Since one teaspoon contains 5 grams, the 4.95 grams of sugar in the blood of a person just short of being pre-diabetic equals a little less than one teaspoon. If you run all these calculations for a blood sugar of 80 mg/dl, which is a much healthier blood sugar than the 99 mg/dl one that is knocking on the door of pre-diabetes, it turns out to be about 4/5 of a teaspoon. If you run the calculations for Continue reading >>

My Fasting Blood Sugar Count Is 174 Mg/dl [9.7 Mmol/l], And, Within Two Hours After Eating, It Is 134 Mg/dl [7.4 Mmol/l]. This Seems To Be Contrary To The Normal Readings. Is This In Order? The Laboratory Staff Say That This Reading Is In Order, And This Can Happen. Is There Any Precedence? Are There Any Precautions To Be Taken?

My Fasting Blood Sugar Count Is 174 Mg/dl [9.7 Mmol/l], And, Within Two Hours After Eating, It Is 134 Mg/dl [7.4 Mmol/l]. This Seems To Be Contrary To The Normal Readings. Is This In Order? The Laboratory Staff Say That This Reading Is In Order, And This Can Happen. Is There Any Precedence? Are There Any Precautions To Be Taken?

My fasting blood sugar count is 174 mg/dl [9.7 mmol/L], and, within two hours after eating, it is 134 mg/dl [7.4 mmol/L]. This seems to be contrary to the normal readings. Is this in order? The laboratory staff say that this reading is in order, and this can happen. Is there any precedence? Are there any precautions to be taken? You have asked a good question. It is a common problem for people with type2 diabetes to wake up with a high blood sugar and see it come down after they wake up and eat their first meal. You did not say if you are taking any medicine, but there are several medications available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. You have asked about taking precautions. A fasting blood sugar of 174 mg/dl [9.7 mmol/L]is certainly higher than the target range of less than 120 mg/dl [6.7 mmol/L]. I would suggest you discuss available therapies with your doctor to help you bring this number down to a safer range. Additional comments from Stephanie Schwartz, diabetes nurse specialist: You have not told us whether you have type1 or type 2, nor have you told us whether nor not you take insulin. If you are on insulin, it may be that your insulin doses need to be adjusted. Without more information, it is hard to answer your question, and as Kris has suggested, you need to discuss this with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 174 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 174 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glucose it has previously stored for energy. Eating or drinking after the meal and before testing the blood sugar: Continuing to eat will keep blood sugars closer to their immediate post-meal levels. Studies show that 15 to 20 minutes of moderate exercise, such as walking, shortly after a meal may improve glucose metabolism and reduce postprandial glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born, a Continue reading >>

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why Its A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why Its A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why Its a Problem and 5 Ways to Fix It The patient I am going to describe is unique in her own issues, but her frustration with conventional medicine could be duplicated in my practice many times over. Louisa is a forty-five-year-old teacher and mother of two. After the birth of her children, she was unable to lose the twenty-five pounds she gained and she was experiencing profound fatigue. After watching one of my webinars on the epidemic of diabesity, which is broadly described as the continuum from mild insulin resistance (when your cells become numb to insulin) to full-blown diabetes and obesity, [1] Louisa asked her primary care physician to test her fasting blood sugar and check her thyroid. Her blood sugar came back at 98 mg/dl and her thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 2.7. Her doctor told her that both were in the normal range and that she was simply experiencing the effects of aging. Her doctor was correct that the American Diabetes Association has identified a fasting plasma glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL as being pre-diabetic and anything below 100 is normal. [2] But if you were to wait until your glucose level is in that range, youve got a serious problem. In fact, current guidelines have been shown to miss the diagnosis of insulin resistance in 41 to 50 percent of the cases. [3] , [4] Several studies demonstrate that fasting glucose levels should be less than 87 mg/dL. [5] , [6] Anything above that is borderline and suggests insulin resistance, and most likely the cause of fatigue, low energy, more belly fat, sugar cravings, and difficulty with weight loss. You see, blood sugar should neither be too high in the morning nor go up and down excessively. For healthy weight and energy, your body needs to use glucose while kee Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Print Friendly

Print Friendly

The glucose tolerance test with insulin gives you great information about where your body is right now, on the day of the test. To complement that information, youll want some measure of longer-term sugar-induced glycation damage to your bodys protein and lipid molecules. The standard test for that is hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a direct measurement of glycation damage to hemoglobin, one of the most important molecules in your body, and one that is readily measured with a simple blood test. If a fasting or after-meal glucose is a snapshot, think of hemoglobin A1c as a security camera recording that tracks where youve been over the past 2-3 months.19 Hemoglobin A1c results are reported as the percent of total hemoglobin thats been damaged by glycation; a level of less than 5.7% is considered good, but 5% is even better. If your level is higher than 5.7%, it means your body has been seeing too much sugar for too long and that means your insulin levels will also likely have been elevated as your body tries to cope, with potentially disastrous consequences. Studies show that the risk of heart attack, stroke, and cancer all go up with rising levels of hemoglobin A1c.21-23 And one of the strongest correlations with frailty in older adults is a persistently elevated hemoglobin A1c level.24,25 Although it doesnt measure glucose or insulin, the vertical auto profile (VAP) test is especially valuable for people with borderline or elevated blood sugar. Thats because both impaired glucose tolerance and full-blown diabetes are associated with blood lipid disturbances that create a very high cardiovascular disease and stroke risk; one of the major risks is from smaller-than-normal particles of low density (LDL) cholesterol.26-29 Unlike standard lipid profiles, a single VAP test directly Continue reading >>

Is 174 Normal Bs?

Is 174 Normal Bs?

Right after leaving my dr, (who told me she would drop dead if i ever got diabetes--she assured me i am perfectly normal), i decided to eat a sandwich with a small fruit cup. 1 hour later my bs was 174--at 2hours 15 min, it is still 160. Is that normal????? What do I do to get some help?? I asked for antibody tests to rule out LADA--I had to tell her which ones because she says she has never heard of MODY or LADA. She will find prices for me but won't recommend them, so i will have to pay for them myself. and my sugars have been good for a couple of weeks--pretty much always under 120. under 100 at 2 hours. however, i didn't walk the past couple of nights--could that be it? i told her that my c-peptide was below the normal range--she thinks i am a hypochondriac.. what do i do? she is freaking because i lose weight every week. i eat 6 times a day--120 g of carbs--and that is probably why my sugars are okay. if my sugars were always good, my a1c wouldn't be a 5.3, would it? she says that is very good. granted, that would be very good for someone with diabetes, and i am doing diet restriction to get it. how do i stop losing weight while avoiding complications related to diabetes? i am scared of eating too much meat, as there is small amount of protein in urine--she insists it is nothing--it was 13mg/dl. on life insurance tests. should i worry about that? That is not normal, those bs (actually called bg for blood glucose) are high. You should maybe get a new doctor that knows what tests need to be done and can perform them or order them. Where are you located? How do you know your c-peptide number, did a different doctor do that test? You are absolutely right about the a1c number, find a new doc for goodness sakes! D.D. Family Too long, what matters is how I live. Have you Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

The Effect Of Cinnamon On Glucose Of Type Ii Diabetes Patients

Go to: The incidence of type II diabetes is increasing across the world. Dietary modifications help the patients to control blood glucose. Traditional herbs and spices are commonly used for control of glucose among which cinnamon (Ròu Guì; Cinnamomum cassia) has the greatest effect. Research has shown that adding cinnamon to diet can help to lower the glucose level. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cinnamon on the glucose level in blood. This was a Randomized clinical trial in which 70 Patients with type II diabetes were assigned randomly two groups (35 in cinnamon and 35 in placebo group). The groups were matched in terms of body mass index (BMI), HbAlc and fasting blood sugar (FBS). Patients were treated with cinnamon and the placebo group was treated with placebo in addition to their routine treatment for 60 days. FBG levels and glycosylated hemoglobin of patients on the first day, and 1 and 2 months after treatment were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and paired t-test in Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).16 software. The mean levels of FBS before, and 1 and 2 months after the intervention were 174 ± 59, 169 ± 43 and 177 ± 45; respectively. The levels of HbAlc before and after the intervention in the cinnamon group were (8.9 ± 1.7 and 8.9 ± 1.6). There was no significant difference in FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin levels between the two groups (P = 0.738 and P = 0.87, respectively). Results showed that using certain amount of cinnamon for 60 days did not change the glucose level of diabetic patients. So, using cinnamon to type II diabetes patients cannot be recommended and more studies are needed in future. Keywords: Cinnamon, Diabetes, Fasting blood sugar, Herbal medicine Go to: INTRODUCTION Prevalence of diab Continue reading >>

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Hi doctor, I am a 65 year old male. Before 12 years, I went for my first master checkup without symptoms. The result showed high 2 hours PPBG while FBG and A1c are normal. The consultant physician advised me to eat less at a time and increase the number of feeds in a day and encouraged me to check BG level once in every three months. Accordingly, I have done the tests both at home and labs every three months. My FBG is always normal that is 80 to 85 (rarely crosses 100 but within 105). My A1c is also quite normal of around 4.2 to 5.4. However, my PP (2 hours) is always in the range of 150 to 176. However, when I take reading after three hours of ingestion, the PP value is in the normal range 120 to 140. I do not take any medicine or Insulin. I have no symptoms like frequent urination or too much thirsty and head reeling. Nevertheless, a few months ago, I suddenly developed tinnitus in both my ears. MRI was taken and found normal. My hearing is excellent. Meniere's disease is ruled out. The volume in left ear is more than right ear (Left 6/10 whereas right 3/10). It is the insect cricket's sound. Last week, while I was working on my computer sitting in my usual chair, I developed a catching sensation on both my calves all of a sudden. A bit burning sensation in the calves also felt. It continues. I walk without any difficulty and do the routine. No tickling or pinning sensation. I am in a remote village spending my post retirement with family. My wife being a clinical biochemist advised me to rule out peripheral neuropathy as my 2 hour PP test is always in the range of 150 to 176. I also have a mild pulling sensation at the back of my right thigh. Hence, I request you to suggest tests find out the cause of the problem. Yesterday, my blood sugar levels were FBG 80, PP 176 Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure Chart

Blood Pressure Chart

1. Why did I do this? I searched high and low on the Internet, and I could find nothing like this in one place - a Summary of human BP range, the Averages, and the Comments relating to each BP level. 2. How did I get the numbers? I started with the commonly seen "Systolic/ Diastolic pairs" seen in the literature - 200/120, 160/100, 140/90, 120/80 and 90/60. From there, I interpolated and extrapolated all the other numbers. Note that these are AVERAGE relationships. For instance, instead of 140/90, your BP may be 140/100, or 140/80. Each individual will have a unique systolic-diastolic relationship. If your S/D difference varies significantly from the averages shown above, this can be helpful in assessing your particular cardiovascular condition. 3. Fairly recently, the difference between Systolic and Diastolic pressure, named "Pulse Pressure", has been gaining interest in the research community. This Pulse Pressure has been found to correlate linearly with heart attack risk - the higher the number, the higher the risk. According to this theory, a BP of 140/ 90 (PP=50) is more desirable than a BP of 140/ 80 (PP=60). This PP relationship at each pressure appears to be almost linear. 4. As for the comments, I have "averaged" the references made in the literature, since not all doctors agree upon the pressures at which to treat, and how aggressively to treat (multiple medications, type of meds, etc.). You can rest assured that the pharmaceutical companies prefer that you take medication at 135/80, since they sell the meds. Most doctors are not so aggressive. Remember that ALL medications have side effects. Heart medications have more serious side effects than any other class of prescription drugs. 5. Be aware of the "Circadian Rhythm" cycle. Your Blood Pressure is highly in Continue reading >>

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