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Is 174 High Blood Sugar

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

How To Get Quick Control Over Your Diabetes

High Sugar Level in Just One Week! How I Lowered My Diabetic High Blood Sugar From 399 mg/dl to 112 mg/dl in Just One Week! UPDATE: In January of 2017 I weighed 215 pounds. Today is June 7th and I weighed 150.2 today!!! Amen! I've lost 65 pounds in just a few months!!! Here's a ukulele video I made last month, showing before and after. My sugar last year was 399 mg/dl, but is now 75 mg/dl. My mmol/L was 9.8 last year, but was 6.7 two months ago when I weighed 185. My doctor said my diabetes is all GONE! I've lost another 35 pounds and am now 150 pounds. I'll get my glucose tested again in a couple weeks, which should be 5 point something. My friend, LOSE WEIGHT if you want to get rid of the type II diabetes. I explain in the video and notes how I lost so much weight. I DIDN'T take any diabetes drugs!!! I DIDN'T take any pills or follow anyone's quack diet plan. I simply limited my daily calories to 1,000 or less, and walked a couple hours a day, here a little and there a little. Drink only water. Eat big salads (with hardly any dressing) and stay away from processed and breaded foods. Eat tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, AND FAST A DAY OR TWO EACH WEEK, eating nothing! Don't let people tell you it's unhealthy to eat under 1,000 calories a day. It depends what you're eating. Losing your feet to diabetes is MUCH WORSE! Americans are plagued with “SITTING DISEASE,” sedentary, gluttons and lazy. If you are type II diabetic, like me, this may perhaps be the most important article you ever read concerning your health. I can help you tremendously! I have nothing to sell. I am a born-again Christian and I want to help as many people as I can. You'll love me after reading this article if you have type II diabetes. But before I begin, please understand that I am not a profession Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

The form of diabetes which develops during pregnancy is known as gestational diabetes. This condition has become predominant in the recent pastaccording to the 2009 article in American Family Physician. For instance, in the United States alone, it affects around 5% to 9% of all the pregnant women. Pregnancy aggravates the preexisting type 2 and type 1 diabetes. During pregnancy the sugar level may tend to be high sometimes, posing problems to the mother and the infant as well. However, concerning the sugar level during pregnancy, what's normal? Blood sugar control is one of the most essential factors that should be undertaken during pregnancy. When measures are taken to control blood sugar level during pregnancy, it increases chances of a successful pregnancy. The average fasting glucose for pregnant women without any diabetes condition range from 69 to 75 and from 105 to 108 immediately one hour after consuming food. If you have preexisting diabetes or you have developedgestational diabetes, the best way to handle the blood sugar level is to ensure that it remains in between the normal range, not going too low or high. According to the recommendations of the 2007, Fifth International Workshop-Conference on Gestational Diabetes, which established blood glucose goals especially for diabetic women, during the period of pregnancy, the fasting blood sugar should not exceed 96. Blood sugar should remain below 140 just one hour after eating and below 120 two hours later. Why Is It Important to Keep Normal Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy? The most effective way to prevent complications related to diabetes is to control the amount or the level of blood sugar. This blood sugar control is very significant during pregnancy as it can: Minimize the risk of stillbirth as well as m Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 174 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 174 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

What is diabetes? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. Types of Diabetes The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually Continue reading >>

Does Tight Control Of Blood Glucose In Pregnant Women With Diabetes Improve Neonatal Outcomes?

Does Tight Control Of Blood Glucose In Pregnant Women With Diabetes Improve Neonatal Outcomes?

Does tight control of blood glucose in pregnant women with diabetes improve neonatal outcomes? 1. Vaarasmaki MS, Hartikainen A, Anttila M, Pramila S, Koivisto M. Factors predicting peri- and neonatal outcome in diabetic pregnancy. Early Hum Dev 2000;59:61-70. 2. Ray JG, OBrien TE, Chan WS. Preconception care and the risk of congenital anomalies in the offspring of women with diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis. QJM 2001;94:435-444. 3. Pregnancy outcomes in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1996;174:1343-1353. 4. Nachum Z, Ben-Shlomo I, Weiner E, Shalev E. Twice daily versus four times daily insulin dose regimens for diabetes in pregnancy. BMJ 1999;319:1223-1227. 5. Walkinshaw SA. Very tight versus tight control for diabetes in pregnancy (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2003. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Last updated 2-15-1999. Accessed on January 4, 2004. 6. Walkinshaw SA. Dietary regulation for gestational diabetes (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2003. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Last updated 2-25-1999. Accessed on January 4, 2004. 7. West J, Walkinshaw SA. Treatments for gestational diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance in pregnancy (Cochrane Review). In: The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2003. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Last updated 9-12-2002. Accessed on January 4, 2004. 8. ACOG technical bulletin Diabetes and pregnancy. Number 200December 1994 (replaces No. 92, May 1986). Committee on Technical Bulletins of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Int J Gynaecol Obstet 1995;48:331-339. 9. Gestational Diabetes. ACOG Pract Bull No. 30. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2001;98:525-538. 10. Preconception care o Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

13 Natural And Easy Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Being diagnosed with Type II diabetes can be a bummer, and it can be a struggle to keep blood sugars under control. Sometimes, you may find yourself with blood sugar levels that are higher than normal (let's say around 150, for example), but not excessive enough to necessitate taking more medication. You don't feel very good with the higher blood sugar, but taking medication can make your blood sugar TOO low. So what can you do to lower your blood sugar up to 40 points without taking more medication? Try the following these 13 tips and see if you can lower your blood sugar naturally. (See also: How to Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes) Health Disclaimer: As always, you need to be careful to monitor your sugar levels so as not to become hypoglycemic (that's when your blood sugar is too low, which is dangerous). Talk to your physician before making any changes to your diet. And remember, these 13 tips for lowering blood sugar may work for many people, but they won't work for everyone. Carb Intake Carbs are basically sugar, and everybody should make an effort to control their intake, especially diabetics. 1. Cut Back the Carbs Effects seen: Immediate Your diet is something you want to talk to your physician about, but the simple fact is that a lower carb diet makes it easier to maintain stable blood sugar levels. It's part of why you're hearing so much about the Paleo Diet these days. Carbohydrates are found in starchy foods — root vegetables, grains, rice, and legumes — and all of their derivatives, like bread, pasta, sushi, French fries, mashed yams, and even lentil soup. As someone who has been diabetic for nearly 20 years, I can attest that eating a diet low in carbohydrates, but rich in leafy greens, nuts, dark fruits like berries, and lean meats has had an amazing eff Continue reading >>

Blood Pressure Chart

Blood Pressure Chart

1. Why did I do this? I searched high and low on the Internet, and I could find nothing like this in one place - a Summary of human BP range, the Averages, and the Comments relating to each BP level. 2. How did I get the numbers? I started with the commonly seen "Systolic/ Diastolic pairs" seen in the literature - 200/120, 160/100, 140/90, 120/80 and 90/60. From there, I interpolated and extrapolated all the other numbers. Note that these are AVERAGE relationships. For instance, instead of 140/90, your BP may be 140/100, or 140/80. Each individual will have a unique systolic-diastolic relationship. If your S/D difference varies significantly from the averages shown above, this can be helpful in assessing your particular cardiovascular condition. 3. Fairly recently, the difference between Systolic and Diastolic pressure, named "Pulse Pressure", has been gaining interest in the research community. This Pulse Pressure has been found to correlate linearly with heart attack risk - the higher the number, the higher the risk. According to this theory, a BP of 140/ 90 (PP=50) is more desirable than a BP of 140/ 80 (PP=60). This PP relationship at each pressure appears to be almost linear. 4. As for the comments, I have "averaged" the references made in the literature, since not all doctors agree upon the pressures at which to treat, and how aggressively to treat (multiple medications, type of meds, etc.). You can rest assured that the pharmaceutical companies prefer that you take medication at 135/80, since they sell the meds. Most doctors are not so aggressive. Remember that ALL medications have side effects. Heart medications have more serious side effects than any other class of prescription drugs. 5. Be aware of the "Circadian Rhythm" cycle. Your Blood Pressure is highly in Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

When To Test Blood Sugar After Meals

For some reason the past week brought me a bunch of emails all asking the same question: Are we supposed to test our blood sugar one hour after we start or end a meal? As is true with everything involving diabetes the answer is not simple due to variations in individual blood sugar responses. The reason we test one hour after a meals is to learn how high our blood sugar goes in response to the specific meal. So we want to be testing at the moment when our blood sugar is at its peak. Studies tell us something about the average time it takes for the carbohydrate in our food to turn into blood sugar (carbohydrates are the main nutrient that causes elevated blood sugars). Such studies suggest that most Americans who eat our meals fairly quickly will see a peak somewhere between one hour and seventy-five minutes after we start eating. But because studies only come up with averages, they don't take into account individual variations--and you are, of course, an individual. And when we move from group averages to individual response we learn that when the blood sugar peak occurs depends on a multitude of factors that include how fast we eat our meals, how much we eat at each meal, how tightly bound the glucose is in the carbohydrates we eat, and how efficient our digestive system is at digesting the carbohydrate bound in our food. That explains why the same meal consumed at the same time by two different people may peak at different times--and why I can't tell you exactly when to test. That's why you might try varying the time at which you test a carefully chosen test meal to see if your personal peak is later than average. Choose a simple meal that contains a known quantity of carbohydrate--a single measured portion of something rather than a meal where you have to guess what Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes - Risks, Causes, Prevention!

Gestational Diabetes What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. The expecting mother develops large amount of sugar in her blood which generally resolves itself after baby's birth - unlike other types of diabetes which are lifelong conditions. How does Gestational Diabetes develop? Gestational diabetes develops when the body cannot produce enough insulin - a substance produced by pancreas which regulates the amount of sugar available in the blood for energy and enables any sugar that isn't immediately required to be stored. The pregnant women has to produce extra insulin to meet baby's needs, if her body can't manage this, she may develop gestational diabetes. Blood sugar levels may also rise because the hormonal changes of pregnancy interfere with insulin function. Gestational diabetes usually develops during the last half of pregnancy. Risk Factors • Women who are obese. • Women with high blood pressure • Women listed positive for sugar in urine during antenatal checkup. • Women who are above 25yrs of age. • Women with family history of type 2 diabetes. How is Gestational Diabetes Treated? Gestational Diabetes can be treated by keeping blood glucose level in a target range. Proper diet, physical activity and insulin if required plays important role in maintaining blood glucose levels. • Dietary Tips 1. Have small frequent meals i.e. six small meals in a day. 2. Limit sweets. 3. Include more and more fiber in your diet in form of fruits, vegetables, whole grain bread and cereals. 4. Carbohydrates should be 40%-45% of the total calories with breakfast and a bedtime snack containing 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. 5. Drink 8-10 glasses of liquids/day. 6. Avoid Trans fats, fried foods Continue reading >>

My High Blood Pressure

My High Blood Pressure

I have probably had high blood pressure for a long time. This is the story of how I found out. My Symptoms In hindsight, I can identify many symptoms of high blood pressure, but I either ignored them or thought they were related to other things. The major symptom I had was headaches. Most days I would either wake up with a headache or develop one. Some of them were real “head splitters” … occasionally I would have to lie down to stop the nausea. I remember often working in front of my computer and trying very hard not to move my head to avoid feeling sharp pains. Since being diagnosed with high blood pressure and starting medication, I have not had one headache (around nine months now). My headaches were definitely due to my high blood pressure, but back then I thought they were due to stress, or poor posture due to sitting at a computer all day … or any number of things. My Diagnosis I had been told for years by doctors that my blood pressure was high, but that it was probably due to the “white coat” effect. Turns out it wasn’t. I went to a new doctor, and as she took my blood pressure, she had a very worried look on her face. My systolic blood pressure reading was over 200. She told me to go to hospital immediately and made me promise I would not ignore her warning. At the time I did think she was over-reacting, and I pictured myself sitting in the hospital emergency waiting room for a couple of hours, waiting for a doctor to see me, giving me a couple of pills to take, and heading home. The actual story was very different. I arrived at emergency and was given the standard “patient detail” form to fill out. Before I was 1/3 of the way through, a nurse turned up to take my blood pressure. She also got a worried look on her face, and took me straight t Continue reading >>

Effect Of Buspirone On Blood Sugar Levels In Humans

Effect Of Buspirone On Blood Sugar Levels In Humans

Effect of buspirone on blood sugar levels in humans S. K. Ojha * , M. Nandave and C. Sharma 1 Department of Pharmacology, All India Institute of Medical Science, New Delhi - 110 029, India 1 Clinical Research and Medical Services, Dabur Research Foundation (DRF), 22, Site IV, Sahibabad, Ghaziabad - 201 010, India Indian J Pharm Sci, 2007, 69 (3): 414-417 Psychiatric disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and anxiety disorders are seen more common in diabetic patients. The present study investigated the effect of an antianxiety drug, buspirone on blood glucose and plasma insulin level in healthy humans. Twelve healthy adult male volunteers were administered single oral doses of buspirone (10 mg) or placebo, in a randomized, crossover way, followed by oral glucose challenge (75 g in 200 ml) at reported T max of the respective administered drugs. The blood samples were collected as predose, postdose and post oral glucose load at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 h. Blood glucose and plasma insulin concentrations were estimated by glucose hexokinase and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay methods respectively. The concentration of blood glucose was significantly ( p <0.05) decreased after oral glucose challenge following administration of buspirone in comparison with placebo. However no significant change was observed in the fasting blood glucose and fasting and oral glucose challenge induced plasma insulin. These results suggest that buspirone may have important risks particularly for diabetics, glucose intolerant and nondiabetics who are on long therapy with buspirone. Anxiety disorders and diabetes mellitus are one of the common psychiatric and endocrine disorders prevalent in general population, respectively [ 1 , 2 ]. The incidence and prevalence of anxiety disorders Continue reading >>

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Q. My Pp Blood Sugar Level Remains In The Range Of 150 To 176. How To Reduce It?

Hi doctor, I am a 65 year old male. Before 12 years, I went for my first master checkup without symptoms. The result showed high 2 hours PPBG while FBG and A1c are normal. The consultant physician advised me to eat less at a time and increase the number of feeds in a day and encouraged me to check BG level once in every three months. Accordingly, I have done the tests both at home and labs every three months. My FBG is always normal that is 80 to 85 (rarely crosses 100 but within 105). My A1c is also quite normal of around 4.2 to 5.4. However, my PP (2 hours) is always in the range of 150 to 176. However, when I take reading after three hours of ingestion, the PP value is in the normal range 120 to 140. I do not take any medicine or Insulin. I have no symptoms like frequent urination or too much thirsty and head reeling. Nevertheless, a few months ago, I suddenly developed tinnitus in both my ears. MRI was taken and found normal. My hearing is excellent. Meniere's disease is ruled out. The volume in left ear is more than right ear (Left 6/10 whereas right 3/10). It is the insect cricket's sound. Last week, while I was working on my computer sitting in my usual chair, I developed a catching sensation on both my calves all of a sudden. A bit burning sensation in the calves also felt. It continues. I walk without any difficulty and do the routine. No tickling or pinning sensation. I am in a remote village spending my post retirement with family. My wife being a clinical biochemist advised me to rule out peripheral neuropathy as my 2 hour PP test is always in the range of 150 to 176. I also have a mild pulling sensation at the back of my right thigh. Hence, I request you to suggest tests find out the cause of the problem. Yesterday, my blood sugar levels were FBG 80, PP 176 Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Congratulations! A baby is on the way. Your nine months will be filled with preparations, from decorating the nursery to stocking up on bibs and booties to going for regular checkups to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible. One of the tests that you’ll have during this time is to check for gestational diabetes. A few weeks ago, we looked at Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which is growing more common among pregnant women, will be our focus this week. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or GDM for short, is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. In fact, it only occurs during pregnancy. (Gestational diabetes is not the same as diabetes in women who have existing diabetes and become pregnant). Diabetes, as most of you know, is a condition in which blood glucose levels go too high. High blood glucose levels can be harmful to you and, in the case of pregnancy, to your unborn child. Fortunately, blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be controlled during pregnancy, and in most instances, high blood sugar levels return to normal after the baby is delivered. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States have gestational diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? A lot of changes occur in the body during pregnancy, many of them occurring due to widely fluctuating hormone levels. The placenta, which is what connects the baby to the mother’s uterine lining, makes various hormones, and while this is a good thing, these hormones can sometimes make it hard for the body’s insulin to work properly (a condition called insulin resistance). As a result, blood sugar levels can start to climb in women who cannot produce enough insulin to deal with the insulin resistance. How do you Continue reading >>

Hypertension / High Blood Pressure

Hypertension / High Blood Pressure

What is Hypertension or High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure or hypertension is a chronic condition, which usually lasts a lifetime once it is developed. It is defined as the force of the blood against the artery walls as the heart pumps the blood around the body. Each time the heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Hypertension is a ‘silent killer disease’ and it often presents without any signs and symptoms. There are two measurements when a blood pressure reading is taken - Systolic pressure refers to blood pressure, when the heart beats while pumping blood and Diastolic pressure refers to blood pressure, when the heart is at rest between beats. Blood pressure is measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg). Sphygmomanometer is a device used to measure the blood pressure The normal recommended blood pressure is 120/80 mmHg. If the blood pressure measurement is between the range of 120/80 mmHg and 140/90 mmHg, it is termed as ‘pre-hypertension’. If hypertension is left untreated it can increase the risk of heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and eye damage. Some people may not realize they have high blood pressure until they have problems with their blood, heart or kidneys. Facts on Hypertension Globally, 970 million people suffer from Hypertension About 1.56 billion adults will develop hypertension by 2025. It is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. It is one of the most important causes of premature deaths worldwide and the problem is growing. People with hypertension are more likely to develop complications of diabetes. Almost one in every three people suffers from this condition, and this may be related to our modern sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits. How do you Classify Hypertension? The cause of hypertension ma Continue reading >>

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