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Intermittent Fasting Blood Glucose

Type Of Fuel Affects Frequency Of Eating; When Not To Use Intermittent Fasting

Type Of Fuel Affects Frequency Of Eating; When Not To Use Intermittent Fasting

You might have heard from the paleo community or a personal trainer about the wonderful benefits of Intermittent Fasting and how it can be a tool to speed body fat loss. When looking at the diet and eating patterns of our ancestors it is clear that they would have gone through periods of prolonged fasting while hunting and or gathering for food. During this time stored body fat can be utilized for fuel to provide energy and keep blood sugar stabilized or reduced demand of blood sugar by using ketone bodies as primary fuel. It is important to consider the times in which Intermittent Fasting is appropriate to promote fat loss and when is can actually be counterproductive. WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT “FUEL” SOURCES FOR THE BODY? In a Ketogenic state where the body is using ketone bodies from the breakdown of fat for fuel; intermittent fasting can be a wonderful supplement or tool to speed fat loss. The Ketogenic diet is a diet high in healthy fats such as grassfed butter, nuts and seeds, coconut oil, avocado, moderate in protein and very low in carbohydrates (less than 30 grams per day coming from residual carbs in non-carb dominant foods such as those in non-starchy veggies, nuts, seeds, etc). Reducing intake of carbohydrates from the diet allows for the body to switch from its preferred source of fuel, glucose (from the breakdown of carbohydrates) to using fat for fuel. This utilization or “training” of the body to use fat for fuel leads to a quicker rate of breakdown of stored body fat than with a typical low calorie diet. In people that are non-ketogenic (anyone not consistently following the strict low carb diet), their bodies will dump glucose from the liver when not eating to reduce a blood sugar crash! Both low blood sugar and high blood sugar are regulated by h Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

How Much Do Glucose/insulin Levels Rise After Eating A Meal While Doing Intermittent Fasting?

How Much Do Glucose/insulin Levels Rise After Eating A Meal While Doing Intermittent Fasting?

Your glucose and insulin levels will rise after intermittent fasting depending on what kinds of foods you choose to eat. Here’s what those foods are. When you consume food they’re broken down into different kinds of molecules. These molecules are released into the blood stream and causes insulin to spike as well. Insulin’s job is to shuttle theses molecules into the cell. Insulin levels can be elevated for several hours depending on how much food you consume. As soon as you consume food your body processes and absorbs them resulting in being in a fed state. When your body is finished processing food, insulin begins to decline to a lower level or base line level. Once insulin drops, your body goes back into a fasted state. So in a sense, your body goes from fasted to fed all day long depending on how much you eat throughout the day. Anytime you consume food the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Every time you consume food your body releases insulin. Certain foods spike insulin more than others and spiking insulin at the wrong time of day can wreck havoc on your quest to burn fat. Carbohydrates are the worst offenders of spiking insulin at a high rate. However, they can have big benefits for those who are building muscle. For that article, – See more at: 3 Powerful Carb Timing Tricks to Build Muscle Consuming the traditional North American breakfast such as, bagels, cereals, muffins and toast is the worst kind of breakfast to have if your goal is to burn fat. The reason for this is upon wak Continue reading >>

Can Intermittent Fasting Improve Diabetes?

Can Intermittent Fasting Improve Diabetes?

Fasting, unless you're a religious person and doing it for a holiday, seems like an extreme thing to do. After all, to properly function in life, even if you are overweight and have diabetes, you need calories to help you concentrate at work, walk down the street, pick up kids (both physically and in a car), and lots of other everyday functions. But "light" fasting or fasting at irregular intervals ('intermittent') can help with Type 2 Diabetes. Numerous studies support this method of fasting. Here's the basic idea: limiting your caloric intake every other day, or 2-3 days a week, or even refraining from food calories altogether one day a week can help with weight loss, increase gluten sensitivity, improve cardiovascular disease. It's even as effective as bariatric surgery in obese individuals. Some nutritionists suggest that those trying to control blood sugar levels and keep energy steady throughout the day should eat three balanced meals at regular times every day. That can still be a valuable strategy in combating fluctuating blood glucose levels and alertness at work. But you don't have to eat, say, a big breakfast every day. Do you notice how on some days you're hungrier than others? And hungrier at certain times of the day than others? A TRUE PALEO DIET...the original fast? No doubt you've heard by now of the popular Paleo Diet, which eliminates grains, pasteurized dairy products like pizza and every baked good, among other things. The theory goes that if the food wasn't around during caveman times, don't eat it. True Paleo Diets didn't have 3 regularly scheduled meals per day. There were no drive-throughs, of course, 10,000 years ago. Paleolithic-era inhabitants lived by the feast and times of famine (fasting not by choice). Kill a sabertooth tiger and voila, fo Continue reading >>

What I Learned From A Year Of Intermittent Fasting

What I Learned From A Year Of Intermittent Fasting

What I Learned from a Year of Intermittent Fasting It won't solve all your health problems, but it might make your life a bit better These adaptations to how I eat havent changed the fact that I love eating. If anything, I enjoy the process of gathering ingredients, cooking, and eating now more than ever. (Photo: Britt Nemeth) For several years during my early thirties, I was constantly tired. Starting around 2012, I was going for a five-mile run about three times a week, lifting weights just as often, and usually getting a good nights sleep. I wasnt training for the Olympics or running ultras, and I didnt have a newborn keeping me up at night. I also wasnt out of shape, overweight, or unhealthy. Yet every afternoon I felt the need to lie down for a napand if I didnt, I was often irritable. I struggled to explain the problem to my wife and friends. I was fit and healthy. This was the prime of my life. Shouldnt I feel great? Over the course of three years, I spoke to several doctors, but none could pinpoint a major medical issue. One naturopath thought it might be mono, but the test turned out negative. An MD thought I might be depressed, but I didnt feel depressed. Another naturopath thought it might be chronic fatigue syndrome, but that is, in the words of the CDC , a debilitating and complex disorder characterized by profound fatigue that is not improved by bed rest and that may be worsened by physical or mental activity. I wasnt facing anything that extreme. Its only now, a few years later, that Im confident I know what was going on: my blood sugar levels were out of whack. I had trained my body to crave simple carbohydrates, and I was caught in a cycle that left me crashing despite a constant sugar fix. How did I realize this and end the sugar-up-then-crash cycle? Continue reading >>

All About Intermittent Fasting, Chapter 4 | Precision Nutrition

All About Intermittent Fasting, Chapter 4 | Precision Nutrition

As you can see, for a guy nearing 40, I started this experiment lean, strong, fit, and muscular, and with a good blood profile that any doc would be satisfied with (notice all the values are within the reference ranges). Im very happy with that. And for the record, I didnt train for the pre-testing. This is just me. Ive been able to maintain this kind of health and fitness profile, plus or minus 10 pounds of bodyweight, for nearly 20 years. I was curious. After my first one-day fasting experiment, some colleagues asked if Id ever done any extended fasting experiments. I hadnt. But I had become very interested in the work of strong IF proponents like Ori Hefenkler, Brad Pilon, and Martin Berkhan. Reading the anecdotes from their website followers, I became intrigued with the idea that you could skip meals and sometimes entire days of eating without suffering lethargy, brain fog, and muscle loss. Even more intriguing was the idea that you could accelerate body fat loss and get healthier with strategic, well-timed fasts. These claims run counter to todays popular nutritional recommendations, which assert that small, frequent eating grazing, if you will is the best way to control appetite, blood sugar, and body weight. As someone whos averaged 4 to 7 meals per day for nearly 20 years, I was skeptical at first. After all, the grazing concept has not only served me well, its helped over 100,000 of my own clients and readers (and millions of people worldwide) get into better shape. Especially in light of the infancy of the IF research, ignoring all the evidence and experience I have with grazing and higher meal frequency diets or throwing it out the window based on the theories and anecdotes of a few individuals would be an absurd overreaction. Instead, I wanted to test it ou Continue reading >>

Who Should Avoid Fasting/intermittent Fasting?

Who Should Avoid Fasting/intermittent Fasting?

Many of you know that Im a huge advocate for fasting/intermittent fasting as it can trigger numerous hormonal adaptations that do not happen with basic caloric reduction/constant intake of food. I also want to stress that fasting/intermittent fasting isnt for everyone. I personally dont have specific eating windows for myself I eat when Im actually hungry. If you ignore your hunger cues, you will add stress. If youre stressed, I dont recommend fasting as it is just another stressor which will result in cortisol rising and possibly result in your adrenal glands becoming overworked. If you have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) I also do not recommend fasting until your glucose and insulin levels are properly managed. When intermittent fasting, there are extended periods of time where there are low levels of insulin circulating within the body. This is good for fat-loss, but not good for those with low blood glucose levels. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should also be cautious before fasting/intermittent fasting. Fasting in any of the above states can actually have adverse effects. I recommend to stop intermittent fasting if: youre not recovering from workouts as easy you have trouble falling asleep or experience sleep disturbances your overall tolerance to stress decreases Continue reading >>

How To Use Your Blood Sugar Meter As A Fuel Gauge

How To Use Your Blood Sugar Meter As A Fuel Gauge

While reducing carbohydrates is the first priority for someone with diabetes, elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance can be an indication that you are eating too much and/or too often. You can use your blood sugar meter as a fuel gauge to help you understand whether your hunger is real and refine your meal timing to achieve blood sugar levels closer to optimal. Delaying your next meal allows your body to use up the energy stored in liver and bloodstream. Intermittent fasting will allow the glucose in your blood stream to be replenished from the glycogen stores in your liver and muscle, rather than more food, allowing energy to flow from your fat stores. The table outlines a protocol that will help you to use your blood sugar meter as a fuel gauge to reach your diabetes and fat loss goals. blood sugar action greater than average, well slept and low-stress delay eating and/or exercise less than average if hungry, enjoy nutrient dense foods that align with your insulin sensitivity < 73mg/dL (4.0 mmol/L) if hungry, eat higher insulin load foods and delay exercise This approach is not intended for people who do not produce enough insulin (i.e. type 1 diabetes, type 1.5, LADA and MODY) but rather for people who are insulin resistant and produce large amounts of insulin but still have high blood sugar levels (i.e. pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes). Eating frequently will keep your insulin and blood sugar levels consistently high, particularly if you eat foods with a high insulin load. Reducing meal frequency enables blood sugar and insulin levels to decrease. High levels of insulin keep fat stores locked away and glycogen trapped in the liver. Once our adipose tissue can’t absorb any more energy, it becomes insulin resistant. This makes it harder for insulin to g Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting | Whole New Mom

The Benefits Of Intermittent Fasting | Whole New Mom

Have you heard of intermittent fasting? It's a practice that isgrowing in popularity, with articles popping up here and there.Maybe you know someone who has tried intermittent fasting, or you have even tried some aspect of fasting yourself. Before you push it aside as another fad, let's look at what intermittent fasting is, what the benefits ofintermittent fasting are,fasting safety, and more. Intermittent fasting is an ancient practice, in all major religions, that involved abstaining from food for set periods of time for the purpose of health and spiritual focus. My emphasis here ison the health aspect, but I also believe the spiritual focus is a worthy reason to pursue intervals of fasting on a regular basis. I have been practicing intermittent fasting for about 8 months now. The time frames for me have been to fast from supper to supper 1 day/week (so about 24 hours) and then fasting supper to lunch 2 other days (so more like 18 hours). The beauty of intermittent fasting is that you can pick any time frame (most of us fast 12 hours or more naturally from evening until we eat our break fast). One of the biggest benefits of intermittent fasting is weight loss. Over the8 month time period during which I have practiced fasting, I lost 40 lbs. This was in conjunction with a low-carb, high fat diet. I have found that fasting is more simple to implement than any diet. It is free and simple to fast, because you simply dont eat. Most special diets have some complications that require time and money to figure out. Intermittent fasting does not require time or money, which greatly simplifies life. Insulin Resistance, Blood Sugar, and Metabolism Another key area of health that is impacted by intermittent fasting is insulin resistance and blood sugar levels. When someone is ins Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting & Blood Glucose Episode 184

Intermittent Fasting & Blood Glucose Episode 184

[46:26] Spinning Affecting Strength Gains [51:27] Finding Pants For Big Legs And Small Waist 1. Intermittent fasting driving up my fasting blood sugar Ive been paleo for 5 years and a 100% compliant. A year ago I switched to the Lean Gains protocol with only paleo foods. I went from 15% bf to maintaining -8% bf year round with no effort, this is validated through hydrostatic bf testing. As you can see Im extremely lean and I hold a lot of muscle mass but my only worry is my fasting blood glucose level. I keep track of my blood glucose and what I have started to notice is my fasting BG has started to move up with no change in diet. Should I be worried? My average morning fast glucose level is 100-110 and this will some times get up to 124 through out the morning. Once I eat it falls to high 80s to high 90s. On work out days my blood glucose post work our is high 70s to low 80s. What should I do? Should I abandon the IF and eat breakfast? I thought IF is suppose to make you insulin sensitive and not resistant. I would love your input as this is worrying me. Workout days (3 days per wk): Cals 3200 Macros P 350g~, F 50g~, C 200g~ -first meal 12pm~lean cuts of meat, 1lb veggies -second meal 7-8pm lean cuts of meat, 1lb veggies, 1.5 lbs sweet potato Non workout days: Cals 2100 Macros P 275g~, F 100g~, C 30g~ -first meal 12pm~100g pro (fattier cuts of meat), 1lb of veggies -second meal 7-8pm 100g pro (fattier cuts of meat), 1lb of veggies One of the things that going Paleo has done for me is that at age 48 Im playing Ultimate Frisbee like Im 28. Serious speed and not so sore afterward benefits. The problem Im having is getting some good sleep after playing. I usually play at night in various pick-up and league games since its an after work kinda thing. This means stopping pla Continue reading >>

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Why Are Fasting Blood Glucose Numbers High?

Stumped by high fasting blood glucose results? Join the club. "It just doesn't compute. When I snack before bed, my fastings are lower than when I limit my night nibbles," says Pete Hyatt, 59, PWD type 2. "It's logical for people to point the finger for high fasting blood sugar numbers at what they eat between dinner and bed, but surprisingly food isn't the lead villain," says Robert Chilton, M.D., a cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. The true culprit is compromised hormonal control of blood glucose levels. The Essential Hormones During the years (up to a decade) that type 2 diabetes develops, the hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. Four hormones are involved in glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, a group of hormones secreted from the intestines that includes glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available. {C} How the Essential Hormones Work in the Body When d Continue reading >>

Bob Troia- N=1 Experiments | The Quantified Body

Bob Troia- N=1 Experiments | The Quantified Body

[Damien Blenkinsopp]:Hello Bob, thanks so much for coming on the show. [Damien Blenkinsopp]: How did you get into all of this Quantified Self (QS), biohacking, n=1 experiments? Is this something youve been doing for a while? Give us a quick background on what led you to this. [Bob Troia]: Sure. Im very different to some of your past guests, in that Im more like your typical listener. Im not an expert in a certain field; Im an entrepreneur whos been working with emerging technology for about the last twenty years and I just naturally had this curious mind. Even back in the time I was a little kid, it was always about taking things apart and figuring out how things work or putting them back together in a different way. For me, going back to my teenage years and into college, I was an athlete, so I was always tracking aspects of workouts and training and diet, trying to figure out what had an effect on certain performances and just general improvements, whether its trying to gain weight or strength or run faster. As I got older, out of college and began joining the workforce in the real world, I never got too out of shape, in terms of putting on tons of weight or anything like that, but I definitely wanted to get back into a better shape and I experimented with different diets and training, and again, I was logging a lot of these meals, workouts, and just trying to understand those effects. So really you went from tracking for performance to getting back to a certain state, and now as you get older, youre really looking to do it from the standpoint of longevity and maintenance. Because, for example, I had a program I did fifteen years ago where I gained a bunch of muscle and put on some weight, but it was just from a lifestyle perspective, I couldnt maintain it from playi Continue reading >>

How Intermittent Fasting Boosts Exercise!

How Intermittent Fasting Boosts Exercise!

/ How Intermittent Fasting Boosts Exercise! How Intermittent Fasting Boosts Exercise! So what happens if you add exercise to the wholeintermittent fasting scenario? While people quickly assume exercising on an empty stomach will hinder performance and speed up exhaustion, studies consistently showquitethe opposite. This pic was before my fasting daysbut whatever. I used to bike around Sanibel Island 25 miles every day in the summer. Good times. But this picture is actually in Disneys Animal Kingdom. Which is also magical! Sorry this so ADD. #Caffeine When I think of my pre-fasting days, I think of daytime lethargy and equating an hour long workout toeons. Perhaps the biggest difference in my life from intermittent fasting, is that the idea of running out of energy just really isnta thinganymore. I simply know I can keep going, no questions asked. When fasting, you dont tire as easily. (I literally dont remember the last time I took a nap although I kind of miss those!) Theres a reason for this magical endurance. Typical non-fasted exercise is fueled by glucose (sugar from carbohydrates) and glycogen (carbohydrates stored in the muscles and liver.) The use of glucose and glycogen for fuel during exerciseinhibitsfatty acid oxidation. This not only blunts fat burning in general, but also puts a proverbial ceiling on endurance, since glycogen stores arequitelimited compared to fat. You can deplete glycogen stores in an intense exercise session, whilethe average person has enough stored body fat to walk over 1,000 miles!No big deal. (1) When your body is accustomed to relying primarily on carbohydrates from your relatively-recent last meal, you hit the wall when you use up that stored glycogen. In fact, this typically occursbeforecomplete glycogen depletion, as the brainant Continue reading >>

Your Good Health: Blood Sugar Test Points To Diabetes

Your Good Health: Blood Sugar Test Points To Diabetes

Dear Dr. Roach: I am a 67-year-old man, in excellent health, who takes no medications and is very proactive about maintaining good health: I do fitness three days a week, yoga three days a week and I fast on Saturdays. On Sundays, I take weight, blood pressure and blood sugar readings. I am writing to you about my blood-sugar readings. My fasting blood sugar readings are uniformly in the 90s, probably averaging 93. A friend suggested that I also should check my blood-sugar reading one hour after eating. I did that, and it was a shocking 173. I have no symptoms or complaints concerning anything that might be related to blood sugar. Is this normal? Should I be checking into something, such as diet, as a result of this? L.A. This is not normal. If confirmed by a second test, you meet the diagnosis of diabetes, almost certainly Type 2. In early diabetes, the only defect is the inability to respond to a sugar load. That’s the reason a glucose-tolerance test remains the best test to make the diagnosis of diabetes, even though it can be diagnosed by high fasting blood sugars (eventually), or by the A1c level (a measurement of overall blood glucose level in the past several weeks). You need to see your regular doctor or a diabetes specialist. I am not yet a proponent of intermittent fasting (I am conservative, and won’t recommend a drastic change in lifestyle without good evidence). In people with diabetes, I think this idea is particularly bad. Regular meals are important, and their composition is critical. In early diabetes, it’s the sugar load that the body has a hard time with. Since processed carbohydrates (such as white bread) are rapidly converted to sugar, the key is to have meals with protein and healthy fat, and to make the carbohydrates you eat come more from v Continue reading >>

Dear Diary: My Life On The Fast 800 + 16:8 Intermittent Fasting Diet

Dear Diary: My Life On The Fast 800 + 16:8 Intermittent Fasting Diet

Im going to document my attempt to put my diabetes into remission in this thread, using the fast 800-8 week diet, combined with fasting for 16-18 hours most days. Ill add a post to this thread (at least) once a week, with a weekly statistical update. [Feel free to add your experiences, if you feel like it. I just wanted a place in this community to document the journey so making a thread I could keep adding to seemed to make the most sense. But I dont mind at all if others chime in with their own journeys! Fasting blood glucose: M: 5.05 mmol/l, T: 5.28 mmol/l W: 5.06 Th: 5.39 mmol/l (highest in months) F: 4.44 mmol/l S: 4.39 mmol/l Sun: 4.44 mmol/l Starting weight (this week): 150.2 lbs Ending weight: 147.0 lbs. Loss 3.2 lbs BG High for the week: 7.72 mmol/l, Low for the Week: 4.06 mmol/l, Average for the week: 5.5 mmol/l I have been eating 1200 calories a day, and fewer than 20 net carbs in a meal for 6 months, so I didnt expect a dramatic weight loss, or any of the symptoms that accompany starting this diet cold. My weight loss is actually a tad higher than I expected, since I have been losing at a rate of around a pound a week and I only added a new deficit of 2800 calories (less than 1 lb). I would have been kicked out of Roy Taylors studies, since he required a 3.9 lb weight loss in the first week! As I predicted, I experienced none of the symptoms some experience (headaches, hunger, fatigue, chills, muscle cramps). I didnt have many 6 months ago when I made the big dietary change, so no big surprises that a comparatively small change didnt create any. I got a fitness tracker, and plan to increase my steps gradually as suggested in the book. Im undecided about the other exercise recommendations. Not for now (no time) but perhaps later. Food is yummy but the many o Continue reading >>

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