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Ideal Fasting Blood Glucose Level

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

What Is The Normal Range For Blood Sugar Levels, And What Blood Sugar Level Constitutes A True Emergency?

Question:What is the normal range for blood sugar levels, and what blood sugar level constitutes a true emergency? Answer:Now, in a normal individual we measure blood sugar under different circumstances. What we call fasting blood sugar or blood glucose levels is usually done six to eight hours after the last meal. So it's most commonly done before breakfast in the morning; and the normal range there is 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Now when you eat a meal, blood sugar generally rises and in a normal individual it usually does not get above a 135 to 140 milligrams per deciliter. So there is a fairly narrow range of blood sugar throughout the entire day. Now in our diabetic patients we see both low blood sugar levels that we call hypoglycemia, or elevated blood sugars, hyperglycemia. Now, if the blood sugar drops below about 60 or 65 milligrams per deciliter, people will generally get symptoms, which are some shakiness, feeling of hunger, maybe a little racing of the heart and they will usually be trenchant or if they eat something, it goes away right away. But if blood sugar drops below 50 and can get down as low as 40 or 30 or even 20, then there is a progressive loss of mental function and eventually unconsciousness and seizures. And of course that is very dangerous and a medical emergency. On the other side, if blood sugar gets up above 180 to 200, then it exceeds the capacity of the kidneys to reabsorb the glucose and we begin to spill glucose into the urine. And if it gets way up high, up in the 400s or even 500s, it can be associated with some alteration in mental function. And in this situation, if it persists for a long time, we can actually see mental changes as well. So either too low or very exceedingly high can cause changes in mental function. Next: W Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often appear suddenly and are often the reason for checking blood sugar levels. Because symptoms of other types of diabetes and prediabetes come on more gradually or may not be evident, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended screening guidelines. The ADA recommends that the following people be screened for diabetes: Anyone with a body mass index higher than 25, regardless of age, who has additional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, a sedentary lifestyle, a history of polycystic ovary syndrome, having delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds, a history of diabetes in pregnancy, high cholesterol levels, a history of heart disease, and having a close relative with diabetes. Anyone older than age 45 is advised to receive an initial blood sugar screening, and then, if the results are normal, to be screened every three years thereafter. Tests for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and prediabetes Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates that you have diabetes. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent indicates prediabetes. Below 5.7 is considered normal. If the A1C test results aren't consistent, the test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Fasting Blood Glucose Test

Fasting blood sugar levels are self-explanatory to some extent in that they are the blood glucose results you get when undertaking a period of fasting. Fasting is frequently deemed as being at least 8 hours after taking nutrition. This means that blood glucose levels will be taken at a time when your body is less likely to be digesting food. Why measure fasting blood glucose levels? Measuring fasting blood sugar levels can be useful for a number of different reasons including: Diagnosing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes Monitoring the extent of glucose intolerance in people with insulin resistance Setting basal insulin rates in people with type 1 diabetes How is a fasting blood glucose test carried out? A fasting blood glucose test can be carried out either with blood taken from your arm which is tested in a lab, or it can be carried out with a finger prick blood test and a blood glucose meter. A fasting blood glucose involves fasting, not taking food or any non-water drink, for at least 8 hours. A lab tested sample, also known as a fasting plasma glucose test, provides a more accurate result so this method will be used to diagnose or monitor glucose intolerance. When testing to inform basal dose setting of insulin, results from a blood glucose meter will be sufficient. Diagnosis A fasting blood glucose test can be used to diagnose diabetes or Impaired Fasting Glycemia, a condition that has a high risk of developing into type 2 diabetes. Condition indicated Blood glucose level (mg/dl) Normal Under 100 Impaired Fasting Glycemia 100 to 125 Diabetes 126 or more Monitor glucose intolerance If you have a form of glucose intolerance such as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, your health team may wish to carry out a fasting plasma glucose test to monitor how well your body copes Continue reading >>

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels Chart [printable]

JUMP TO: Intro | Blood sugar vs blood glucose | Diagnostic levels | Blood sugar goals for people with type 2 diabetes | Visual chart | Commonly asked questions about blood sugar Before Getting Started I was talking to one of my clients recently about the importance of getting blood sugar levels under control. So before sharing the diabetes blood sugar levels chart, I want to OVER EMPHASIZE the importance of you gaining the best control of your blood sugar levels as you possibly can. Just taking medication and doing nothing else is really not enough. You see, I just don’t think many people are fully informed about why it is so crucial to do, because if you already have a diabetes diagnosis then you are already at high risk for heart disease and other vascular problems. Maybe you've been better informed by your doctor but many people I come across haven't. So if that's you, it's important to know that during your pre-diabetic period, there is a lot of damage that is already done to the vascular system. This occurs due to the higher-than-normal blood sugar, that's what causes the damage. So now that you have type 2 diabetes, you want to prevent any of the nasty complications by gaining good control over your levels. Truly, ask anyone having to live with diabetes complications and they’ll tell you it’s the pits! You DO NOT want it to happen to you if you can avoid it. While medications may be needed, just taking medication alone and doing nothing is really not enough! Why is it not enough even if your blood sugars seem reasonably under control? Well, one common research observation in people with diabetes, is there is a slow and declining progression of blood sugar control and symptoms. Meaning, over time your ability to regulate sugars and keep healthy gets harder. I Continue reading >>

Getting Tested

Getting Tested

You’ll need to get your blood sugar tested to find out for sure if you have prediabetes or type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes. Testing is simple, and results are usually available quickly. Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Prediabetes Your doctor will have you take one or more of the following blood tests to confirm the diagnosis: A1C Test This measures your average blood sugar level over the past 2 or 3 months. An A1C below 5.7% is normal, between 5.7 and 6.4% indicates you have prediabetes, and 6.5% or higher indicates you have diabetes. Fasting Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar after an overnight fast (not eating). A fasting blood sugar level of 99 mg/dL or lower is normal, 100 to 125 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 126 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Glucose Tolerance Test This measures your blood sugar before and after you drink a liquid that contains glucose. You’ll fast (not eat) overnight before the test and have your blood drawn to determine your fasting blood sugar level. Then you’ll drink the liquid and have your blood sugar level checked 1 hour, 2 hours, and possibly 3 hours afterward. At 2 hours, a blood sugar level of 140 mg/dL or lower is considered normal, 140 to 199 mg/dL indicates you have prediabetes, and 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Random Blood Sugar Test This measures your blood sugar at the time you’re tested. You can take this test at any time and don’t need to fast (not eat) first. A blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL or higher indicates you have diabetes. Result* A1C Test Fasting Blood Sugar Test Glucose Tolerance Test Random Blood Sugar Test Normal Below 5.7% 99 mg/dL or below 140 mg/dL or below Prediabetes 5.7 – 6.4% 100 – 125 mg/dL 140 – 199 mg/dL Diabetes 6.5% or Continue reading >>

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

In the last article I explained the three primary markers we use to track blood sugar: fasting blood glucose (FBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (A1c). We also looked at what the medical establishment considers as normal for these markers. The table below summarizes those values. In this article, we’re going to look at just how “normal” those normal levels are — according to the scientific literature. We’ll also consider which of these three markers is most important in preventing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Marker Normal Pre-diabetes Diabetes Fasting blood glucose (mg/dL) <99 100-125 >126 OGGT / post-meal (mg/dL after 2 hours) <140 140-199 >200 Hemoglobin A1c (%) <6 6-6.4 >6.4 But before we do that, I’d like to make an important point: context is everything. In my work with patients, I never use any single marker alone to determine whether someone has a blood sugar issue. I run a full blood panel that includes fasting glucose, A1c, fructosamine, uric acid and triglycerides (along with other lipids), and I also have them do post-meal testing at home over a period of 3 days with a range of foods. If they have a few post-meal spikes and all other markers or normal, I’m not concerned. If their fasting BG, A1c and fructosamine are all elevated, and they’re having spikes, then I’m concerned and I will investigate further. On a similar note, I’ve written that A1c is not a reliable marker for individuals because of context: there are many non-blood sugar-related conditions that can make A1c appear high or low. So if someone is normal on all of the other blood sugar markers, but has high A1c, I’m usually not concerned. With all of that said, let’s take a look at some of the research. Fasting blood sugar According to cont Continue reading >>

Rising Blood Sugar: How To Turn It Around

Rising Blood Sugar: How To Turn It Around

Image: Thinkstock Rising blood sugar signals a need for weight loss and more exercise. Whenever you have routine blood tests at a physical exam, chances are one of the numbers will be a measurement of your glucose, or blood sugar. A normal blood sugar level is less than 100 milligrams per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) after an eight-hour fast. You have diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 mg/dL or higher. But between those two numbers lie many opportunities for action. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Ideal Blood Sugar Levels

Ideal Blood Sugar Levels

I got a blood sugar tester for free, so due to curiosity I decided to measure some pre and post meal levels. But I can't seem to find anywhere what the ideal numbers are. I've looked through some of the big paleo-type blogs but it's like looking for a needle in a haystack. The westonaprice blog has a big fat article about ideal blood sugar but doesn't give any actual numbers anywhere. Can anyone tell me more? What else is interesting about blood sugar levels? 1 Normal Blood Sugar Range Your Search For Normal Blood Sugar Range Ends Here. Find All Details You Needed. JeevesKnows.com 2 Worst Foods For Diabetes Discover the Worst Foods for Diabetes and A Doctor's Secret Natural Solution. Newsmax Health Thank you! Continue reading >>

No Blood Sugar Rollercoasters!

No Blood Sugar Rollercoasters!

Living the Wheat Belly lifestyle means having no wild fluctuations in blood sugar. Take a look at the curves above on the graph. The red curve shows the typical blood sugar rises in a young, slender, non-diabetic person who includes grains and sugars in their diet. While the after-meal peaks shown only reach 110-120 mg/dl, they can go much higher, e.g.,f 180-200 mg/dl, in otherwise healthy people. Recall that high blood sugars oblige high blood insulin that causes weight gain in visceral fat, distortions of hormones (e.g., rise in testosterone in females with polycystic ovarian syndrome), and resistance to insulin that, over time, leads to rises in fasting blood sugars. High after-meal blood sugars also cause glycation, the glucose modification of proteins that is irreversible. If you glycate the proteins in the lenses of your eyes, for instance, you get opacities–cataracts. If you glycate the cartilage proteins in your knees and hips, you get brittle cartilage that, over time, erodes and leads to joint damage and arthritis. If you glycate small LDL particles (that are very glycation-prone compared to large LDL particles), you lead to coronary heart disease. And so on, with no organ system spared from the long-term ravages of glycation. The black curve is an example of someone with type 2 diabetes who begins with high fasting blood sugars, then follows the ridiculous American Diabetes Association diet that advocates a reduction in total/saturated fat and includes plenty of “healthy whole grains” and other carbohydrate/sugar sources. This awful approach exaggerates and accelerates the harmful effects of high glucose/high insulin explaining, for example, why diabetics develop all the consequences of diabetes, many of them from extreme and repetitive glycation, faste Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

​Diabetes is a medical condition in which the blood glucose levels remain persistently higher than normal. It is becoming more common in Singapore This may be due in part to ageing population, unhealthy diets and lack of exercise. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows your body cells to use blood glucose (sugar) for energy. Food is converted into glucose before it is absorbed into our bloodstream. The pancreas then releases insulin to move the glucose from the bloodstream into the body cells for use or storage. People with diabetes are unable to fully use the glucose in their bloodstream because: they lack insulin in the body. insulin is ineffective for them. Related: Beat Diabetes Step By Step There are three major types of diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes No insulin is produced due to damaged pancreatic cells. Usually diagnosed in children or young adults although it can occur at any age. Insulin is needed for treatment. Complications are sudden and life-threatening. Type 2 Diabetes Insulin produced is not enough or not effective (insulin resistance). Occurs more frequently in people over 40 years old, particularly those who are overweight and physically inactive. More younger adults and children are developing Type 2 Diabetes. Can be controlled with proper diet and exercise but most diabetics also need oral medication. Gestational Diabetes Occurs in about 2 to 5 percent of all pregnancies. Women who were not diagnosed to have diabetes previously show high blood glucose levels during pregnancy. Needs specialised obstetric care to reduce serious complications to the unborn baby. Related: Gestational Diabetes> The common symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent thirst despite drinking lots of water Constant hunger Constant tiredness Itchy skin especially around Continue reading >>

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles. Young men with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range appear to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially if they are on the heavy side and have high serum triglyceride levels. That’s the finding of researchers who studied more than 13,000 apparently healthy young men in the Israeli defense forces. The investigators found that so-called "normal" test values may actually predict type 2 diabetes. "Higher fasting plasma glucose levels within the normoglycemic range constitute an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes among young men, and such levels may help, along with body-mass index and triglyceride levels, to identify apparently healthy men at increased risk for diabetes," wrote Amir Tirosh, M.D., Ph.D., from the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps and colleagues at various Israeli institutions. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels below 100 mg/dL (5.55 mmol/L) are considered to be normal, whereas levels between 100 mg/dL and 109 mg/dL signal impairment. But readings at the upper end of the normal limit – just below the 100 mg/dL threshold – might signal risk for future diabetes, and could serve as a risk marker. To see how things stood with glucose among young Israeli adults, they drew on data from the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults study, which tracks all Israeli service personnel older than 25. Participants fill out a detailed demographic, nutrition, lifestyle and medical questionnaire, and have blood samples drawn after a 14-hour fast. The study included data on 13,163 Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a condition which is quite separate from the other types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. The term gestational refers to it occurring during pregnancy. For many women who are diagnosed, their diabetes will go away after their baby is born. However, there is a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in women who have already had gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in around 5% of all pregnancies and of these women: Type 2 diabetes can develop between 5-15 years after their baby is born. 10-50% of women who had gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes. Following the baby’s birth, a mother’s blood glucose level generally returns to normal. What Exactly is Diabetes? Diabetes occurs when a person’s body is either not making enough of the hormone insulin, or their body cannot effectively use the insulin they are making. Insulin is needed so that glucose in the bloodstream can move into the body’s cells and be used for energy. When a person has diabetes, there is too much glucose in their bloodstream and complications from this can arise. During pregnancy the placenta makes specific hormones which are designed to support the baby to grow and develop. But these hormones can also create problems with the effectiveness of a mother’s insulin and impair its usefulness. This is what it means to become insulin resistant. In the best of circumstances, a mother’s insulin level and her blood sugar level will stabilise and there is not an excess or deficiency in either one. But in gestational diabetes blood glucose is not being controlled by adequate insulin, so there needs to be either a drop in dietary glucose, an increase in insulin or a combination of both. Who is at Risk? Women who are over 30 years of age. Women from an i Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Fasting, as the name suggests, means refraining from eating of drinking any liquids other than water for eight hours. It is used as a test for diabetes. After fasting, a carbohydrate metabolism test is conducted which measures blood glucose levels. Glucagon during fasting When fasting the hormone glucagon is stimulated and this increases plasma glucose levels in the body. If a patient doesn’t have diabetes, their body will produce insulin to rebalance the increased glucose levels. However people with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin to rebalance their blood sugar (typically in type 1 diabetes) or their body is not able to use the insulin effectively enough (typical of type 2 diabetes). Consequently when blood glucose levels are tested, people with diabetes will have blood sugar levels significantly higher than people who do not have diabetes. What is the fasting blood sugar test used for? The fasting blood sugar test is also used to test the effectiveness of different medication or dietary changes on people already diagnosed as diabetic. Fasting tests The fasting test should be conducted on two separate occasions to ensure consistent results and in order to avoid a false diagnosis. This is the case as increased blood glucose levels may be as a result of Cushing’s syndrome liver or kidney disease, eclampsia and pancreatitis. However many of these conditions are often picked up in lab diagnostic tests. Fasting test results The results of a fasting test with respect to glucose levels in the body are as follows: Normal: 3.9 to 5.5 mmols/l (70 to 100 mg/dl) Prediabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance: 5.6 to 7.0 mmol/l (101 to 126 mg/dl) Diagnosis of diabetes: more than 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) The American Diabetes Association reduced the level of diagno Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

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