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Ideal Blood Sugar Levels For Weight Loss

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

What Are The Optimal Ketone Levels For A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’ve just started a ketogenic diet, then you’ll know that it can be really tough to figure out if you’re doing keto right. Am I eating too many carbs? Too much protein? Should I still be feeling tired? When is the fat burning supposed to start? It’s confusing, and one of the most confusing aspects is what your optimal ketone levels are supposed to be. Unlike most other diets, the ketogenic diet is designed to put your body into a state of ketosis in order to get your body to start burning ketones instead of the glucose that it usually burns when you eat a high carb standard American diet (SAD). But to know whether you’re in ketosis and whether your body has enough ketones circulating for you to use as energy instead of glucose, you have to measure your actual ketone levels and then determine whether they’re high enough for you to be reaping the benefits of the ketogenic diet. If you’ve tried searching for this information already, then you’ll know that there’s some controversy depending on which expert you follow. So in this article, we’ll tell you exactly what the different experts are suggesting are the optimal ketone levels as well as give you recommendations for what ketone levels you should be aiming for depending on your goals with a ketogenic diet. A Few Quick Notes Before We Start… If you’re looking for signs other than testing your actual body ketone levels as to whether you’re in ketosis or not, then please check out this article instead that provides you with signs you’re in ketosis. If you’re a type 1 diabetic, then this article is not for you and the optimal ketone levels suggested below are not applicable to you. Please check out the tons of other ketone level articles on the web to ensure your ketone levels do not reach Continue reading >>

The Real Reason You're Not Losing Weight

The Real Reason You're Not Losing Weight

Is your blood sugar blocking your efforts to shed pounds? The diabetes-weight connection is trickier than you think. Getty ImagesYou probably know that weight gain ups your risk of diseases like diabetes. But you might not realize how complicated that link really is, says Osama Hamdy, MD, medical director of the obesity clinical program at Joslin diabetes center in Boston and author of The Diabetes Breakthrough. "The cycle starts when you gain weight," Dr. Hamdy says. The kicker is that once you have blood sugar problems, it's much harder to do the one thing that can really help: slim down. That may be why the majority of people with type 2 diabetesabout 80 percentare overweight or obese. The good news: dropping pounds is not impossible if you understand the complex dance between blood sugar, belly fat and insulinand how to interrupt it. The Vicious Cycle, Explained Every time you eat, your pancreas produces insulin. This hormone helps your body harness the energy provided by food by "unlocking" your cells, helping to move sugar (aka glucose) inside each one, where it's used for fuel. The problem starts with insulin resistance, in which your cells no longer respond to the hormone. Weight gain can bring it on, especially if you add visceral fat (the kind around your abdominal organs) because it churns out inflammatory chemicals that harm cells' response to insulin. Think of your body as a car, says David G. Marrero, PhD, president of health care and education at the American diabetes association. "Fill the trunk with 500 pounds of gravel and it's harder to run. It needs more gas and it wears out the engine to get the same level of performance." That's obesity. "Now think of insulin as the gas line between the fuel tank and the engine. Insulin resistance squeezes it, so w Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Insulin!

Blood Sugar & Insulin!

Lately I've received a whole bunch of questions about the benefits and drawbacks of insulin, so why not straighten out the issue, once and for all? Learn the straight forward facts on insulin! Lately I've received a whole bunch of questions about the benefits and drawbacks of insulin, so why not straighten out the issue, once and for all? (Unfortunately, most of this doesn't apply to diabetics, but if you're one yourself you probably knew that already.) Insulin release is mainly a bodily response, caused by the food you eat. You are able to control this factor to a pretty large degree, just like you can control whether or not you get goose-bumps by making sure to wear a sweater when it's cold - even though the goose-bumps in and by themselves isn't something you can control. You can't choose to have high or low levels of insulin floating around in your system, but you can pretty much steer it by eating. A truckload of fast carbs (like Dextrose), a big bowl of rice, and an extended period without food will all have very different impact on your Insulin levels. But let's not rush ahead of ourselves here - let's get the big picture together. Fast vs. Slow Carbs As you probably know, carbs are actually plain sugar. As an experiment, chew on a piece of non-sweet bread for a while, and you will notice an increasing sweetness developing, because your saliva and jaw-action is breaking down the large chunks of sugar into smaller units, which in turn gets noticeable as they get smaller and smaller. This is how it works in your stomach as well. Now, the difference between slow and fast carbs, aka. complex and simple carbs, is how big the chunks of sugar are! Assume that you have a handful of loose powder. In your stomach, there's really not anything more to digest, so the whole bu Continue reading >>

3 Tricks To Support Healthy Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

3 Tricks To Support Healthy Blood Sugar And Insulin Sensitivity

Diet trends seem to change every month or at least every year, and now that low-fat diets are “out” (for good reason!), you’ve probably heard over and over again that carbohydrates are perhaps the WORST thing you can eat when trying to lose fat or transform your body. I’ll save the fascinating facts on fats and why they’re important to consume for another article; for now, let’s focus in on carbs and their effects on your body and weight-loss efforts. It all starts with a hormone known as insulin. To keep it simple, when you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into simple sugars, which are then released in your blood. In response, your pancreas releases insulin. Insulin has numerous functions in the body, especially for metabolism, but the most important for this article is to help your body process, utilize, and store blood sugar. Let’s say you eat a high-carbohydrate meal. Insulin is released to “partition” blood sugar to its final destination—either muscle tissue (to be stored as energy) or fat cells (as body fat). Unfortunately, due to years of consuming a diet full of processed, blood-sugar-spiking carbs and sugars (often a result of eating a low-fat diet), most people are not nearly as sensitive to insulin as they could be. So while insulin should be a huge asset to your body transformation goals, it often becomes a total fat-loss and health-derailing nightmare. The result? Dramatically reduced fat burning (insulin turns fat burning “off”), increased blood sugar levels, and increased fat storage (insulin turns fat storage “on”). But that’s not all; this can lead to poor performance, reduced sleep, slowed recovery, and muscle soreness. Not good. Editor’s Note: 6 Veggies That Cause Fat Gain Ideally, when you consume carbohyd Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Click “Play” to Listen Prefer to Download & Save? Right Click Here & “save as” to your computer. Mac users cmd. + click + “save target as”. Listen to Jon Gabriel Teach About: Why regulating your blood sugar is crucial to weight-loss How to get control of your blood sugar level Top tips for keeping up your energy levels and boosting your health OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here I just wanted to talk a little bit, for starters before we take any callers, about blood sugar. I don’t know if you read the latest newsletter that we sent out, but learning how to regulate your blood sugar is really crucial in losing weight. And when the FAT programs are on, which I talk about in my book, The Gabriel Method, your body loses the ability to regulate its blood sugar properly. And that’s because your body becomes less sensitive to the hormone insulin. So I want to give just a quick talk about how your body normally regulates blood sugar, and what happens when the FAT programs are on, to get your body to no longer be able to regulate blood sugar properly, and why it’s so crucial to be able to regulate your blood sugar and to understand blood sugar if you want to lose weight. So the way your body normally regulates blood sugar, is your body always has to have a certain amount of sugar in your bloodstream at all times to provide energy for your brain and for your muscles and for your liver, and just for basic functioning. If you have too much sugar in your bloodstream, it’s going to cause problems. It can cause nerve damage and it can be extremely detrimental. And if you have too little sugar in your blood, it’s going to make you tired and you’re not going to have enough energy for your brain. So your body always has to keep a certain amount of sugar in your b Continue reading >>

The Secret To Successful Weight Loss

The Secret To Successful Weight Loss

After 20 years of research into healthy eating, nutrition and weight loss, I’ve discovered the best way to achieve stable blood sugar is by eating a low glycemic load diet. Glycemic Load – or GL Load for short – is a unit of measurement, rather like grams, litres, centimetres and calories are. GLs are used to measure the amount of sugar and starch in food and their impact on the body. They show how much carbohydrate there is in each food (and therefore how much glucose it will create and release into the bloodstream as blood sugar) and how fast the carbohydrate will break down into glucose (and therefore how quickly your blood sugar levels will rise). This information is important because blood sugar levels are linked to hunger and the way we eat. When you haven’t eaten for a while, your blood sugar level will dip, and you will become hungry. When you eat a food containing carbohydrate, glucose is released into your bloodstream and your blood sugar level will rise again. The key to achieving your perfect weight is to keep your blood sugar levels stable. To do this you need to eat healthy foods that provide you with glucose in the right quantities. Low GL Load foods release their glucose more slowly so you maintain stable energy levels for longer. When you eat a low GL Load diet: You will stop producing more glucose than you can use, so won’t gain fat. You won’t suffer from food cravings. Your body will be reprogrammed to burn fat rapidly. You will be able to lose weight and sustain your weight loss permanently. Low GL Load is scientifically proven to work There is a wealth of evidence to support the positive benefits of a low GL Load diet. In one study, in 1994, nutritionists tested two groups of 15 people. They put one group on a low GL Load diet and the ot Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Life with type 2 diabetes can sometimes seem like an hourly or even minute-by-minute effort to stabilize your blood sugar. All of the recommendations and drugs you’ve been given as part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan are intended to help you reach — and keep — healthy blood sugar levels most of the time. But doctors are learning that to control type 2 diabetes well, better information about why blood sugar matters and how to manage it is essential. The Facts About Diabetes and Blood Sugar As the American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains, your body needs sugar (glucose) for fuel, and there’s a fairly complicated process that makes it possible for your body to use that sugar. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is the hormone that enables the cells in your body to take advantage of sugar. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body isn’t able to remove sugar from your blood. This can happen if your body stops being sensitive to insulin or if it starts to respond in a delayed or exaggerated way to changes in your blood sugar. Diabetes is signaled by an elevated blood sugar level of more than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for a fasting blood test, or more than 200 mg/dL at any time during the day. It can also be indicated by a hemoglobin A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher, a measure of the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin in the blood during the past two to three months. (Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. So an A1C of 6.5 means that 6.5 percent of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them.) Unchecked high blood sugar gradually damages the blood vessels in your body. Over the long term, this slow, progressive harm can lead to a dangerous loss of sensation in your legs and fe Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

How To Take Control And Optimize Your Blood Sugar Levels

How To Take Control And Optimize Your Blood Sugar Levels

The research linking elevated blood sugar to most diseases is frightening, but there are many research proven methods you will learn in this article on how to improve and manage your blood sugar level. Over the long-term this will lead to improvements in general health and most other aspects of life, including improved brain function, energy levels, hormone health, fat loss, decreased disease risk and collectively, increased life expectancy! As with most things, there is one key variable involved in blood sugar health. Your Diet AND Blood Glucose Levels A big aspect of blood sugar control and improving insulin sensitivity is the food you eat. In addition to exercise, your diet probably has one of, if not the biggest, impact on your blood sugar levels. Firstly, excessive calorie intake not only leads to weight gain, but also makes the body insulin resistant (1). In other words, your body stops its correct handling and function of the blood sugar. By reducing your calorie intake, you can significantly improve fat loss, health and your blood sugar levels. The good news is that it doesn’t take much weight loss to greatly increase insulin sensitivity. In fact, modest weight loss of only 10 lbs has been shown to cause a 30% improvement in insulin sensitivity (2). Along with eating less and optimizing your calorie intake, there are other ways you can change your diet to improve your health and blood sugar levels. These include: Control your carbohydrate intake Studies have shown that balancing your carbohydrate intake throughout the day may help (3, 4) Even just monitoring how you respond to different amounts and types of carbohydrates (sustained energy versus lethargy and crashes) can be important (8). In the graph below, one study found a 5 week high protein, low-carb diet Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight By Balancing Your Blood Sugar (5 Easy Ways)

How To Lose Weight By Balancing Your Blood Sugar (5 Easy Ways)

All of these years, you’ve been told that counting calories, following point systems, and choking down fat-burning pills are the ultimate solutions for weight loss. And as one of America’s most profitable industries, fad-diet quick-fixes make tall promises, which only yield short-term (and often disappointing) results. 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 The truth is, there’s an easier way to lose the weight—and it has nothing to do with miracle nutrients, detox teas, or dieting. Instead, sustainable weight loss can be achieved by learning how to balance your blood-sugar levels. What is Blood Sugar, and How Does it Work? You may want to hit the snooze button when it comes to blood sugar 101. But having imbalanced blood-sugar levels could be the exact reason why you’re not losing weight—especially if you feel like you’ve tried everything else to no avail. Blood sugar simply refers to the amount of sugar (or glucose) in your blood, which comes from carbohydrates. Whenever you eat, your body receives an influx of nutrients, including carbohydrates. During digestion, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar molecules and sent to your bloodstream, which naturally raises your blood-sugar levels. The hormone insulin is then released to bring the sugar out of your blood—and into your cells to be converted into energy. That sounds simple enough, right? Just a regular biological process… No big deal. But here’s where the connection between blood sugar and weight gain comes in. How Imbalanced Blood-Sugar Levels Can Make You Fat You see, your body only needs so much energy at once. So if your energy stores are already full at the time of digesting the carbohydrates, any excess sugar from Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

7 Ways To Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Enjoy Mediterranean meals iStock/Thinkstock According to studies involving 140,000 people, the odds of developing diabetes are 21 percent lower for those who follow a Mediterranean diet—building meals around plant-based foods, including fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, and olive oil. Fish and chicken are eaten regularly but not red meat, butter, or sweets. Phytonutrients and fiber in the plant foods help with blood sugar control, and the olive oil might reduce inflammation. Go blue iStock/Thinkstock Eating more anthocyanins—the nutrients that give grapes and berries their bright red and blue colors—was linked to better blood sugar control in a new British study. One portion a day of grapes or berries can have the same impact on blood sugar as a one-point reduction in your body mass index, says researcher Aedin Cassidy of Norwich Medical School. Don't skip breakfast If you frequently miss a morning meal, you'll be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Eating breakfast may help stabilize blood sugar throughout the day. Prepare a healthy blend of protein, complex carbs, and fat—yogurt mixed with fruit and nuts, for example. Starting the day with lots of simple carbs (such as a bagel and OJ) is just as bad for your blood sugar as skipping the meal, according to experiments at the University of Minnesota. Sweat and strengthen iStock/Thinkstock Women who did both cardio (at least two and a half hours) and strength training (at least one hour) every week had the lowest diabetes risk—about one third less than that of non-exercisers. After an exercise session, your muscles take up more glucose from the bloodstream. As you become more fit over time, cells become more sensitive to insulin. Step away from the desk (and the TV) Hemera, iStock, Photodisc/ Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

How To Lose Fat From Stomach By Balancing Your Blood Sugar

How To Lose Fat From Stomach By Balancing Your Blood Sugar

The minds of aspiring weight losers are often awash with complications of calorie counting, avoidance of macronutrients, or adherence to some form of overly restrictive diet. It’s time for shift in that mindset! The key to maintaining a healthy weight or losing unwanted belly fat could be as simple as balancing your blood sugar levels more efficiently. Blood sugar, or blood glucose, is your bodies main source of energy. After enjoying a regular meal or snack your blood sugar rises. The scale of this increase is linked to the volume and type of carbohydrates you've consumed. The glucose circulating in your bloodstream provides immediate energy for cells, or if unused can be stored as glycogen in the muscles or liver for future use. However, excess blood glucose levels can lead to weight gain. A study completed by researchers at the University of Southern Denmark in 2005 demonstrated that high levels of glucose increase fat production in the pancreas and exhibit high fat levels in the bloodstream. Stable and balanced blood sugar is important. It plays a critical role in the regulation of hormones, as well as enabling your body to leverage stored fat as energy. What’s more, your blood sugar level dictates hunger and energy. Maintain consistent blood sugar and you’ll keep hunger in check and feel energised. The Role Of Insulin Consuming the appropriate volume and mix of proteins, carbohydrates, fats and fiber will naturally stabilise your blood sugar profile and keep nasty insulin spikes at bay. Insulin is a hormone created by your pancreas that plays a primary role in blood sugar transport and fat storage. When you consume carbohydrate foods, such as starch and fruits, they’re broken down into sugar which your body converts into glucose. The pancreas then releases Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

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