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Ibuprofen And Type 1 Diabetes

What Should People With Diabetes Consider When Selecting Pain Medication?

What Should People With Diabetes Consider When Selecting Pain Medication?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Pain Advil Can’t Cure

The Diabetes Pain Advil Can’t Cure

Here’s something that’s hard to get your head around: There’s a kind of pain that affects type-1 and type-2 diabetics that doesn’t register as what you’d typically think of as, well, painful. It’s nerve damage called diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN), and though its symptoms can be mistaken for simple pins and needles, it can have serious effects on the longterm health and daily wellbeing of diabetics. Even worse? Most doctors don’t know their patients are hurting. More than 80% of diabetics with DPN reported painful symptoms, according to a recent survey of 1,004 adults, but health care providers estimated that fewer than 41% percent of them were hurting. More from Prevention.com: 14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics “A patient with pain needs to speak fairly aggressively with their doctor,” says Bruce Parsons, MD, PhD, the senior medical director of Pfizer, which co-ran the research with the American Chronic Pain Association. “Part of the problem is that people don’t know it’s even pain,” says ACPA founder and CEO, Penney Cowan. “It’s not a shooting or stabbing pain, but it’s more like numbness, and it can feel like walking on broken glass even when they’re not standing.” Another symptom of DPN is increased sensitivity to pain, where something as light as a bed sheets can feel very uncomfortable. And as the disease progresses, there’s an increased risk of foot ulcerations. Diabetics themselves often overlook DPN, too, because the numbness isn’t enough to seek treatment, so they believe that it’s something they can manage in the same way they do their blood sugar—but they can’t. “Once a nerve is dead, the damage is irreversible,” says Cowan. “There are medications available, but that’s only a piece of the Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes , you know it well: Too much sugar isn’t good for you. People whose blood sugar is too high or difficult to control are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, eye problems and other complications, including nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy “High blood sugar is toxic to your nerves,” says  Robert Bolash, MD , a specialist in Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Pain Management. “When a nerve is damaged, you may feel tingling, pins and needles, burning or sharp, stabbing pain.” Diabetic neuropathy typically starts in your toes, feet or ankles and creeps up your body as the condition worsens, he says. However, nerve damage also can affect your hands and wrists as well as your heart, digestive system, sex organs and more. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some kind of neuropathy , reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) . “Anyone with diabetes can get nerve damage at any time,” says Dr. Bolash. “It’s most common in people whose blood sugar is poorly controlled and those who have had diabetes a long time.” According to the NIDDK, the highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes 25 years or longer. To avoid getting diabetic neuropathy, control your blood sugar, keeping it as close to nondiabetic levels as possible, advises Dr. Bolash. The bad news about diabetic neuropathy is that it’s tough to reverse. It also can cause serious problems, especially in your feet. If you don’t feel blisters, sores or other foot injuries and don’t promptly care for them, you Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Diabetes And Ibuprofen | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Diabetes And Ibuprofen | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi all, I'm fairly recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I take 2 metformin a day and test my blood when I'm not feeling right. On Monday, I had a really bad headache and took 2 ibuprofen. This sent my blood sugars from 5.9 to 9.9. I didn't eat anything carb or sugar based, and I felt very lethargic, unable to stay awake and pretty bad nausea. Has anyone else experienced this? My diabetic nurse this morning said it was the first she had heard of it. Many thanks. It could be that whatever was causing the headache caused the additional problems too? Or maybe the Ibuprofen were coated in something sugary? I take a fair amount of them so I'll have to keep an eye on it! (I haven't been controlled until now so wouldn't have noticed any effect!) I was told some 3 or4 years ago that Ibuprofen was not good for diabetics A short course of ibuprofen seems to be alright. It is when they are used long term as they can affect the kidneys. They are also not advised for people with high blood pressure. Your rise in blood sugar could be attributable to the way that you were feeling @KrissiA . This could cause me some problems. I rely on ibuprofen as I'm allergic to paracetamol and aspirin doesn't always work for me...... Guess I need to make an appointment with my dr to see if there's an alternative out there for me. Due to fibromyalgia I already use (very sparingly) dihydrocodeine.... I take ibuprofen sometimes and my blood sugar is ok, same with paracetamol and codeine. Maybe it is caused by something else. Then again, we all react differently to medications. JohnEGreen Type 2 (in remission!) Expert Ibuprofen was at one time along with other NSAIDs, considered in Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

Children With Diabetes - Ask The Diabetes Team

My ten and one-half year old daughter has had type 1 diabetes for 14 months. Last winter, she developed a Brown's syndrome in her eye, and her eye does not "track" with the other. When the muscle is inflamed, she has pain and blurred or double vision and we treat with large doses of ibuprofen [an antiinflammatory medication]. Is the Brown's related to type 1 diabetes? I thought eye problems would be much further down the road, if ever. Will the large doses of ibuprofen interfere with her diabetes treatment? Brown's syndrome is not related to type1 diabetes, and, to my knowledge and checking with my endocrinology colleagues, ibuprofen will not interfere with her diabetes treatment. Long term chronic use of ibuprofen has kidney issues that may need to be addressed at some point. Brown's syndrome is usually manifested when the affected eye is looking toward the nose and up. Tracking side to side is usually not a problem, but there can be variants. Brown's syndrome that is acquired can be due to inflammation, and hence the treatment with non-steroidal antiinflammatory medications (such as ibuprofen). Active inflammation may benefit from local steroid injections. Inflammatory Brown's syndrome has occurred in rheumatoid and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and this may need exploring. Lastly, diabetes-induced ischemia can cause eye muscle dysfunction and subsequent double vision "down the road", and usually is transient. Brown's syndrome is an unrelated entity. Continue reading >>

What Medicines Should Diabetics Take For Fever? | Zocdoc Answers

What Medicines Should Diabetics Take For Fever? | Zocdoc Answers

Medical questions & health advice by board certified doctors "What medicines should diabetics take for fever?" Zocdoc Answers What medicines should diabetics take for fever? My son is 12 and he has type 1 diabetes. He has been running a fever since this morning. I don't think it's anything serious, just something going around his class ? but what medicines can I give him to help bring down his fever that won't interact with his insulin? Is there a general rule about insulin interaction? In general most medicines that you would give a child will not "interact" with insulin. There are some key exceptions to this I'll discuss below. I also must stress that this answer is very general and does not take into account your child's past medical history and other health considerations. Therefore, you should call your pediatricians office with any questions regarding medications. Insulin is a natural hormone in the body. Therefore medicines such as Tylenol that are frequently given for fever in kids should be perfectly fine in a child as long as that child does not have an allergy to Tylenol. There are medicines you should consider staying away from unless his doctor specifically approves them. For example don't give him ibuprofen or naproxen without asking his doctor because these medicines can be hard on the diabetic kidney. There are also medicines that other diabetics take for blood sugar that he should never take because they could drop his blood sugars dangerously (they are all prescription so don't worry about it). I suggest that at your next visit with the pediatrician, you bring up the issue of what drugs can be given to my child with diabetes. Only he or she will know the absolute answer to this question. Also make sure that you discuss the most important things that c Continue reading >>

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

How Medications Can Impact Type 1 Diabetes Management

When taking medicine, you must always read labeling carefully and be aware of possible side effects. When you have Type 1, you have the added consideration of how it will affect your blood glucose levels as well as any devices that you depend on for your diabetes management. And as with anything you digest, you must know the carb count, administering insulin as needed. Apart from daily medication such as birth control, having a sick-day protocal is always smart for the unexpected bug. This way, you’ll be stocked ahead of time with essentials to ease your mind and decrease additional stress over your care. Here are some must-knows about over-the-counter medication and what it means for your Type 1. Cold Medicine Being sick stresses the body, and when your body’s stressed it releases blood-glucose raising hormones. These hormones can even prevent insulin from properly lowering your levels. Consider the following when taking cold medicine: Opt for pill forms – if possible, pills over syrups are better for their lack of carbohydrates. Check for added sugars – When taking syrups, double-check the labels of over-the-counter brands to make sure they don’t have added sugar. See if there’s a sugar-free option – Though small doses of sugar don’t pose a huge risk, your safest bet is to ask your pharmacist about sugar-free syrups. Check your BGLs frequently – This should be triple the time you typically check. Being sick makes you more susceptible to BGL extremes. Administer insulin accordingly – Medicine, just like food, must be dosed for. Blood Glucose Levels Even without sugar, short-term cold medicines can send your blood glucose levels spinning. Aspirin has been known to lower glucose levels Pseudoepinephrine, the decongestant found in most over-the-counter Continue reading >>

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

How Pain Relievers Can Affect Blood Sugar Levels

Many of us don’t even think about our blood sugar levels when we’re scrabbling through the medicine cabinet, looking for a pain reliever. We just want to make the pain disappear—stat. But people with diabetes do need to take that matter into consideration when they’re taking any medication. If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor or diabetes educator has probably warned you to be vigilant about the effects that that your diet, your activity level, and any other medication you take on a regular basis can have on your blood sugar levels. You also need to be careful about any pain relieving medication that you take, even if it’s just on an occasional basis, because certain types of pain killers can lower or raise your blood sugar levels. NSAIDs There are times when you can easily treat pain with an over-the counter pain reliever. You may take a low dose of aspirin or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) like ibuprofen or naproxen to relieve the occasional headache or muscle pain. A regular dose is unlikely to affect your blood sugar levels, but a higher-than-usual dose may lower your blood sugar level. Talk to your doctor about what’s an appropriate dose for your occasional aches and pains so you don’t accidentally cause an episode of hypoglycemia. Another word of caution. You might have settled on an effective dose of a particular pain reliever that won’t drastically alter your blood sugar levels. But your diabetes puts you at elevated risk for certain other health conditions. So you may have other medical conditions you need to manage—and you will need to watch out for the effect any pain killers you take can have on those. For example, NSAIDS like ibuprofen and naproxen can increase your blood pressure. And they can affect your kidneys, too, Continue reading >>

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

Can A Simple Fever Be That Bad For A Diabetes Patient?

No doubt you’ve heard the advice, “Drink plenty of fluids,” for a fever. This is because fever causes considerable fluid loss through the skin as perspiration. Your loss of fluid can be difficult to estimate, so your physician may want to assume that you’d require 1–2 more quarts of fluid daily than you’d normally need. Ordinarily, a mild fever helps to destroy the infectious agent (virus or bacteria) that caused the fever. The tendency to sleep out fever may also be beneficial. For a diabetic, however, the somnolence that you experience with fever may discourage you from checking your blood sugar, covering with insulin, drinking adequate fluid, and calling your physician every few hours. If you don’t have someone awaken you every 20 minutes, you should use aspirin, acetaminophen (Tylenol), or ibuprofen (Advil or Motrin), in accordance with your doctor’s instructions, to help fight the fever. Beware, however, that aspirin can cause false positive readings on tests for urinary ketones, so don’t even test for ketones if you are using aspirin. Never use aspirin or ibuprofen (or any of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) for fever in children because of the risk of Reye’s syndrome. Excessive doses of aspirin or NSAIDs (naproxen, ibuprofen, and many others) can cause severe hypoglycemia. If at all possible, try not to use NSAIDs, as the combination of these drugs with dehydration can cause kidney failure. Acetaminophen can be highly toxic if used in doses greater than those indicated on the package label. If you have fever, the guidelines for blood sugar control and replacement of fluid are almost the same as indicated previously for vomiting. There is one difference, however. Since there is very little electrolyte loss in perspiration, it Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen?

Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 so i usually take aspirin but for really bad muscle pain (as opposed to headaches or whatever) i take ibuprofen. I messed up my back again recently so i've been taking 600 mg of ibuprofen... then someone mentioned something to me and i read the inactive ingrediants which include: cellulose, corn starch, hypormellose, lactose, polydextrose, glycol, stodiaum starch glcolate, stearic acie and titanium dioxide. could this be what's f**king w/my blood sugar? 600 mg is a tiny amount of anything. If anyone of those ingredients were ingested at 600mg they would do nothing to your BG. For example, If the only inactive ingredient in aspirin where sugar and it was present at 600mg, it would be like taking 1/8 of a glucose tablet. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 and yeah it's 600 mg of ibuprofen, i'm sure it's trace amounts of the rest of the stuff. I take Ibuprofen when I absolutely need to. For me, and I'm told that we all react differently to different medications, Ibuprofen works very well and doesn't up my B/G levels and BP or upset my stomach, thank heaven! Shaun is very knowledgeable and would know more than I would. I agree with what he shared with us. Aspirin doesn't work for me, nor do any of the other substitutes unless they're prescriptive and I'm on enough prescriptive stuff for my diabetes and high blood pressure now. I'm thinking of opening a pharmacy... :-( Take good care and give the Ibuprofen a try... and maybe take an extra B/G level test or two when you first start taking the Ibuprophen as well... just to see what happens with your particula Continue reading >>

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing A Pain Reliever

Choosing Wisely is an initiative by the ABIM Foundation to identify commonly-used tests or procedures whose necessity should be questioned and discussed. This information was developed by Consumer Reports in cooperation with the American Society of Nephrology. If you need a painkiller but suffer from high blood pressure, heart failure, or kidney disease, it’s best to steer clear of some commonly used pain relievers. Those include: Ibuprofen, which is sold under the brand names Advil and Motrin, and also as a generic or store brand. You can buy it without a prescription at the drug store. It’s sometimes combined with other drugs in other over-the-counter products, such as certain cold remedies. Naproxen, sold under the brand name Aleve and as a generic or store brand. It doesn’t need a prescription, either. Celecoxib, a prescription drug sold as Celebrex. All three of those drugs, which are called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, can ease pain and inflammation. But they are too risky if you have any of those health problems. Here’s why. They’re bad for high blood pressure. All NSAIDs can cause or worsen high blood pressure. That increases your chance of having a heart attack or stroke. The drugs can also make some blood pressure drugs less effective. That includes diuretics such as hydrochlorothiazide (Hydrodiuril and generic), ACE inhibitors such as lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril, and generic) and ARBs such as losartan (Cozaar and generic). They’re bad for the heart and kidneys. Long-term use of NSAIDs can make your body hold onto fluid, which can worsen heart failure symptoms, such as shortness of breath, swollen ankles, and a rapid or irregular heartbeat. They can also reduce kidney function. That makes the drugs risky for people who already Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

Diabetes And Sick Days: What Meds Are Ok

In the midst of cold and flu season, you may wonder what medications are safe to take without greatly impacting blood glucose levels when you have diabetes. Overall, it's the sickness that increases blood glucose in people with diabetes, not the medication used to treat it. However, some medications should be used with caution. Stacey O'Donnell, R.N., B.S., C.D.E., nurse manager, at Joslin Diabetes Center, goes over different types of medications and how they could impact your diabetes. Examples: Tylenol, Aspirin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Use cautiously if you have renal disease. Anti-inflammatory Examples: Ibuprofen, such as Advil, Motrin, Nuprin Effect on diabetes: No effect. Also should be used carefully if you have renal disease. Examples: Allegra, Bumex Effect on diabetes: Caution should be used in patients who have diabetes with renal disease, cardiac disease and high blood pressure. General guidelines for taking medications for people with diabetes are to avoid products containing sugar, such as sucrose, dextrose, fructose, lactose and honey, O'Donnell says. Also, choose products with little or no alcohol. A suggested list of sugar-free cough and cold medicines includes: Chlor-Trometon tablets Dimetapp Elixir Scot-Tussin DM Liquid Cerose-DM Liquid Continue reading >>

Can There Be Complications Relating To Using Ibuprofen If One Has Insulin Dependent Diabetes?

Can There Be Complications Relating To Using Ibuprofen If One Has Insulin Dependent Diabetes?

Home Q & A Questions Can there be complications... Can there be complications relating to using Ibuprofen if one has insulin dependent diabetes? There shouldn't be any major problems if you are a insulin dependent diabetic and take ibuprofen. In some cases ibuprofen can cause hypoglycemia ... if you are aware of this and recognize and treat the symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should be fine. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . Durezol - I have insulin dependent Diabetes? The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

Pain Medicines For Diabetic Neuropathy - Topic Overview

Pain Medicines For Diabetic Neuropathy - Topic Overview

Pain Medicines for Diabetic Neuropathy - Topic Overview Articles OnPain Medicines for Diabetic Neuropathy Duloxetine ( Cymbalta ), which is an antidepressant. It may cause dry mouth , nausea , constipation , diarrhea , and sometimes dizziness and hot flashes . Anticonvulsants such as carbamazepine , gabapentin , and pregabalin . Anticonvulsants are also frequently prescribed to reduce pain linked with diabetic neuropathy . Lidocaine or mexiletine . Lidocaine comes as a patch that you can put on your skin where the pain is the worst. Mexiletine is an oral medicine similar to lidocaine. Both medicines are used to relieve pain caused by neuropathy . Capsaicin cream. Capsaicin is a substance contained in cayenne peppers. Although it may not provide complete pain relief, it may help relieve minor pain in some people. Capsaicin cream is applied directly to the skin over the painful area. Nonprescription pain relievers. These include acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ( NSAIDs ), such as aspirin , ibuprofen , or naproxen . Although they may provide some temporary pain relief, they are not effective for long-term treatment of severe pain. Note: People with diabetes need to be especially careful when taking NSAIDs because these medicines may upset kidney function. Be safe with medicines. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Narcotic pain relievers such as oxycodone , which may reduce moderate to severe pain from diabetic neuropathy . But narcotics are usually only given to people who do not have a personal or family history of addiction . Narcotics may also cause side effects that could make symptoms of autonomic neuropathy worse. So narcotics are not often the first type of medicine tried for symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. If you begin taking an Continue reading >>

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Go Easy On The Advil, Motrin, Ibuprofen Etc.

Another study has added to the evidence we already have that suggests that nonsteroidal antinflamatories, the "non-aspirin pain killers" you buy over the counter at the pharmacy are bad for you. The latest study, published in the journal Neurology was hoping to prove that taking these drugs would lower the incidence of dementia. Instead it found the opposite. Here's the study: Risk of dementia and AD with prior exposure to NSAIDs in an elderly community-based cohort. J. C.S. Breitner et al. Neurology 2009, doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181a18691) The researchers "followed 2,736 dementia-free enrollees with extensive prior pharmacy data, following them biennially for up to 12 years to identify dementia and AD." What they found was: Contrary to the hypothesis that NSAIDs protect against AD, pharmacy-defined heavy NSAID users showed increased incidence of dementia and AD, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.66 (95% confidence interval, 1.24–2.24) and 1.57 (95% confidence interval, 1.10–2.23) This did not surprise me at all, for reasons that were not cited in any discussions of this study. Many people do not realize heavy use of NSAIDs has been linked to high blood pressure and that there appears to be a lifetime dose that dramatically raises the risk of developing end stage kidney disease. I have written about this with appropriate journal citations HERE. One of the studies cited on that page, published in Archives of Internal Medicine , concluded: [Men] who took acetaminophen six or seven days a week had a 34% higher risk of hypertension. Those who took NSAIDs six or seven days a week had a 38% higher risk and those who took aspirin six or seven days a week had a 26% higher risk. High blood pressure is a known cause of vascular dementia, and the older and more fragile people ar Continue reading >>

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