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Ibuprofen And A1c

Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen?

Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 so i usually take aspirin but for really bad muscle pain (as opposed to headaches or whatever) i take ibuprofen. I messed up my back again recently so i've been taking 600 mg of ibuprofen... then someone mentioned something to me and i read the inactive ingrediants which include: cellulose, corn starch, hypormellose, lactose, polydextrose, glycol, stodiaum starch glcolate, stearic acie and titanium dioxide. could this be what's f**king w/my blood sugar? 600 mg is a tiny amount of anything. If anyone of those ingredients were ingested at 600mg they would do nothing to your BG. For example, If the only inactive ingredient in aspirin where sugar and it was present at 600mg, it would be like taking 1/8 of a glucose tablet. Insulin (avg): 19.8 U (35% bolus); CHO (avg): 87g; BG (avg): 97 mg/dl; SD: 31 Tests (avg): 5.1; High: 168; Low: 51; highs>140: 3; lows<70: 10 Member PCOS Type2 since 2003 +/- Insulin Since June 2007 and yeah it's 600 mg of ibuprofen, i'm sure it's trace amounts of the rest of the stuff. I take Ibuprofen when I absolutely need to. For me, and I'm told that we all react differently to different medications, Ibuprofen works very well and doesn't up my B/G levels and BP or upset my stomach, thank heaven! Shaun is very knowledgeable and would know more than I would. I agree with what he shared with us. Aspirin doesn't work for me, nor do any of the other substitutes unless they're prescriptive and I'm on enough prescriptive stuff for my diabetes and high blood pressure now. I'm thinking of opening a pharmacy... :-( Take good care and give the Ibuprofen a try... and maybe take an extra B/G level test or two when you first start taking the Ibuprophen as well... just to see what happens with your particula Continue reading >>

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

How To Manage Diabetes While On Oxycodone

What happens to a person’s blood sugar when they are under stress due to pain, and must take a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone? In this article, we will explore what happens to a person with diabetes who is taking long term pain medication. We will look at whether it raises or lowers blood glucose. We will look at how taking oxycodone affects blood glucose levels, activity levels and appetite, and how that could influence the self-management of diabetes. We will look at ways that you can maintain blood glucose in target ranges while taking a narcotic pain reliever such as oxycodone. John’s story As John relayed to me during a phone conversation, he is taking a combination of oxycodone plus acetaminophen for severe pain in his legs related to poor circulation and neuropathy because of his Type 1 diabetes. He has had severe sleep disruption, and was getting no relief on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents. He has been taking oxycodone now for about three months, and has seen a need to increase the basal rate on his insulin pump in order to stay in target range with his blood glucose. He found that once the stress of the pain was gone, his numbers have stayed in range. I suggest reading the following: What is oxycodone? Oxycodone is a narcotic pain reliever that is used to relieve moderate to severe pain. It is in the class of drugs called “opiate analgesics,” and can be found in combination with other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin, acetaminophen, or ibuprofen. Oxycodone can also be found in combination with aspirin and acetaminophen. Each of these components can also have side effects in addition to the oxycodone. Brand names of combination medications include Nortab, Vicodin, and Lortab and Percocet. Precautions for oxycodo Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Ibuprofen - Other Medications - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I stuck this on another thread, and realized it might not get read on a thread about meters, so here it is again. I have had the trouble with my knee hurting for a couple of weeks. My doctor kind of skimmed over it, telling me to just use a little extra aspirin, since I take one daily. But the last few days, my knee hurts so bad it wakes me at night, and my limp is worse. I decided to risk taking a couple of Ibuprofen...I couldn't believe the relief. When I woke in the night and took two more, I actually slept again. But yesterday morning, my BS was 273. Because I was feeling so good, I decided to take the Ibuprofen a couple more days and took 2 about every 6 hours. My knee feels almost normal, but this mornings BS was 350. I took an extra Novolog shot and it is down to 160. Now, do I endure the pain in my knee, or the high BS? The only thing I can think of is the pain itself, my BS has been elevated since the knee started, but just the last two days have I used the Ibuprofen, and had the very high readings. My opinion is that you have hit on the answer yourself. The bad pain is stressing your system you are running adrenaline in response and your liver is responding accordingly - anyway, that's my guess. I hope the pain goes soon - it sounds as bad as toothache. An alternative painkiller that was recommended to me by my pharmacist for when Ibuprofin doesn't work is a mixture of paracetamol and codeine (called Co-codamol in the UK). This works like absolute magic for me. I too have bad knees. The right is notable worse. After the MRI showed I have a problem with the back of the knee cap and a Continue reading >>

Can Ibuprofen Be Taken Before Or After A A1c?

Can Ibuprofen Be Taken Before Or After A A1c?

My back hurt a bit when I was done, but took some ibuprofen ... "Sounds like so far, so good on all dieting. I am down 2.5 lbs in 2 days, but I am sure most of that is water weight. Still, I'll take it! Norma, I am trying to do the videos too. I did the 1st one the first day. I was able to do the full 30 minutes, mostly doing the adapted exercises. My back hurt a bit when I was done, but took some ibuprofen and all seemed fine. Until the next morning, where again I seemed fine, but must have turned my neck funny and it has been read more... killing me! Don't know if this was the exercising or just a coincidence. Decided not to exercise yesterday--was short on time anyway, as DD2 and I were going to services. Had to get up early this a.m. for more meds, but now it seems much improved. I'll have to see how I am doing later, but would very much like to move on to the 2nd exercise video. DM, So you like the book, it is just different? Ann, The trip sounds like it should be interesting. Good that your friends dropping out does not discourage you from going. The shoes are 3 different styles. I am going to wait and see if they show up today. They said 2 business days, but I don't know if Saturday counts. If not, I will go out tomorrow in search of alternatives (Jan, they are all heels--I am too short to wear flats to an interview :-). All I know about the interview is there are a total of 8 candidates in the 1st round and everyone is being interviewed on Monday or Tuesday. They sent me a bunch of questions I need to be prepared to answer and I have to start with a 5-7 minute presentation on why I want the position and why I think I am qualified. Norma, Work was very quiet for me yesterday too. There were few people in, and everyone pretty much stayed in their offices. I had o Continue reading >>

Moderate Blood Sugar Control Targets Recommended For Most Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Moderate Blood Sugar Control Targets Recommended For Most Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Moderate blood sugar control targets recommended for most patients with type 2 diabetes Patients with type 2 diabetes should be treated to achieve an A1C between 7 percent and 8 percent rather than 6.5 percent to 7 percent, the American College of Physicians recommends in a new evidence-based guidance statement. Patients with type 2 diabetes should be treated to achieve an A1C between 7 percent and 8 percent rather than 6.5 percent to 7 percent, the American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends in an evidence-based guidance statement published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. An A1C test measures a person's average blood sugar level over the past two or three months. An A1C of 6.5 percent indicates diabetes. "ACP's analysis of the evidence behind existing guidelines found that treatment with drugs to targets of 7 percent or less compared to targets of about 8 percent did not reduce deaths or macrovascular complications such as heart attack or stroke but did result in substantial harms," said Dr. Jack Ende, president, ACP. "The evidence shows that for most people with type 2 diabetes, achieving an A1C between 7 percent and 8 percent will best balance long-term benefits with harms such as low blood sugar, medication burden, and costs." ACP recommends that clinicians should personalize goals for blood sugar control in patients with type 2 diabetes based on a discussion of benefits and harms of drug therapy, patients' preferences, patients' general health and life expectancy, treatment burden, and costs of care. The rationale in guidelines that recommended lower treatment targets (below 7 percent or below 6.5 percent) is that more intensive blood sugar control would reduce microvascular co Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Drugs Affecting Hba1c Levels

Drugs Affecting Hba1c Levels

Go to: Diabetes mellitus has assumed epidemic proportions worldwide, causing much morbidity and mortality on account of its various complications. The development of chronic vascular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy and cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to the level of glycemic control attained by the individual with diabetes. Therefore, it is essential to have an index of the long-term glycemic control in diabetes patients, which in turn can be used to guide therapy and predict the likelihood of complications. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was first described by Rahbar et al. in 1969.[1] Subsequent studies showed that the level of HbA1c correlated well with the glycemic control over a period of 2 to 3 months, leading to the gradual incorporation of the test into clinical practice in the 1980s.[2] With the publication of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial[3] and the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study,[4] both of which correlated the HbA1c levels to the development of diabetes complications, HbA1c estimation has become established as a cornerstone of diabetes management. Hemoglobin (Hb) is a tetramer formed of two alpha and two beta globin chains. On exposure to high levels of blood glucose, hemoglobin gets non-enzymatically glycated at different sites in the molecule. HbA1c is formed when glucose gets added on to the N-terminal valine residue of the beta chain of Hb.[5] The levels of HbA1c in the blood reflect the glucose levels to which the erythrocyte has been exposed during its lifespan (approximately 117 days in men and 106 days in women). Therefore, the HbA1c is an index of the level of glycemic control over the preceding 2 to 3 months. Of this period, the immediately preceding 30 days contribute 50% to HbA1c.[5] A Continue reading >>

Dear Dr. Roach: Is Inflammation To Blame For Nightly Bathroom Trips?

Dear Dr. Roach: Is Inflammation To Blame For Nightly Bathroom Trips?

Dear Dr. Roach: Is inflammation to blame for nightly bathroom trips? Dear Dr. Roach: I am 80 years old and have had problems with a slightly enlarged prostate for years. This, of course, means frequent nightly trips to the bathroom every one and a half to two hours. I stumbled upon the fact that if I take two ibuprofen (400 mg) at bedtime, I seldom have to go to the bathroom before my normal 6:50 a.m. wake-up time. This has been wonderful, and I wonder if there might be some good medical reasoning here, or if it is just dumb luck on my part. I'm sure many of your readers would be interested in this bedtime subject. A: There have been a few small trials showing that some people's symptoms get better with an anti-inflammatory medicine like ibuprofen. This seems to be the case with both men and women, so it clearly isn't working solely on the prostate. Some authors have speculated that inflammation of the bladder might be the underlying cause for nocturia ("noct" for "nighttime," and "uria" for "urinating"), which is how ibuprofen might work. Small doses are unlikely to cause harm; however, some people with sensitive stomachs might have problems, and people with kidney disease need to be very careful with any anti-inflammatory. Dear Dr. Roach: I am in my 70s, and overweight by 25 pounds. My average sugar level is still around 160. I read that metformin will drop your glucose level by only 20 percent. Will that percentage increase if I take more? If so, by how much? Do I have to take metformin for the rest of my life? Will my body ever correct itself? A: Average sugar level, also called estimated average glucose, is a way to describe blood sugar control in people with diabetes or prediabetes. A level of 160 is equivalent to an A1c level (a more commonly used measure of blo Continue reading >>

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increase Insulin Release From Beta Cells By Inhibiting Atp-sensitive Potassium Channels

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs Increase Insulin Release From Beta Cells By Inhibiting Atp-sensitive Potassium Channels

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase insulin release from beta cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increase insulin release from beta cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels Some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) incidentally induce hypoglycemia, which is often seen in diabetic patients receiving sulphonylureas. NSAIDs influence various ion channel activities, thus they may cause hypoglycemia by affecting ion channel functions in insulin secreting beta cells. This study investigated the effects of the NSAID meclofenamic acid (MFA) on the electrical excitability and the secretion of insulin from pancreatic beta cells. Using patch clamp techniques and insulin secretion assays, the effects of MFA on the membrane potential and transmembrane current of INS-1 cells, and insulin secretion were studied. Under perforated patch recordings, MFA induced a rapid depolarization in INS-1 cells bathed in low (2.8mM), but not high (28mM) glucose solutions. MFA, as well as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and flufenamic acid (FFA), excited the cells by inhibiting ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP). In whole cell recordings, KATP conductance consistently appeared when intracellular ATP was diluted. Intracellular glibenclamide prevented the development of KATP activity, whereas intracellular MFA had no effect. At Continue reading >>

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

Over-the-counter Meds That Raise Blood Glucose

From cough syrup to decongestants, here are the over-the-counter drugs that may affect your blood glucose Continue reading >>

Ibuprofen And Blood Sugar

Ibuprofen And Blood Sugar

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Does anyone know if anti-inflammatories have a side effect of reducing blood sugar levels? I have been taking Ibuprofen for a couple of weeks for a painful tooth, and have noticed that my fasting blood sugar levels are down considerable, and consistently. Is this coincidence? Or is there another explanation? Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Welcome to the forums. Yes it is possible for NSAID's to lower a1c levels in T2's. Here's a reference study................. Thank you so much, Urbanracer. I wonder if we should all start taking small doses of anti-inflammatories?! tina_marie Don't have diabetes Well-Known Member My husband is taking them and since he started on them his readings have been low . This morning he was 4.8 and yesterday morning he was 4.5. Thank you, all of you. I understand that anti-inflammatories do indeed reduce blood sugar levels. It is thought that high BS could be caused by inflammation, so logically anti-inflammatories woud be the right treatment. But, as you have warned, these could have a bad effect on the kidneys. I am so disappointed - thought I had stumbled upon a cure of Type ! Where do we go from here? Is there any research going on? Any trials? Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

Why Controlling Your Weight Lowers Your Risk Of Diabetes

Why Controlling Your Weight Lowers Your Risk Of Diabetes

Inflammation is an important link between obesity, elevated blood sugar, and type 2 diabetes. Image: tetmc/Thinkstock We've known for a long time that being overweight is a major risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. But only in the last 20 years have researchers determined that metabolism and immune responses are linked and that chronic inflammation plays an important role in the development of obesity, diabetes, and related metabolic diseases. "Inflammation is not only associated with obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, but also precedes and predicts these conditions," says Dr. Allison Goldfine, head of the Clinical Research section at Harvard-affiliated Joslin Diabetes Center. Continue reading >>

I Am A Diabetic And I Would Like To Know If Taking Ibuprofen Will Raise My Sugar Levels?

I Am A Diabetic And I Would Like To Know If Taking Ibuprofen Will Raise My Sugar Levels?

Home Q & A Questions I am a diabetic and I would... I am a diabetic and I would like to know if taking ibuprofen will raise my sugar levels? osteoarthritis , pain , ibuprofen , surgery , diabetic , knee The reason I am asking is because I had knee surgery about a month ago, and I have been taking 400 mgs 3 times a day and my sugar levels have become alot higher than is normal for me. My sugar was always under control before I started taking it. According to the list of known side effects of ibuprofen ... it can cause hypoglycemia. But in your condition since the hyperglycemic episodes have started after you started taking ibuprofen (and that is the only change in your medication, diet, etc.), then it could most likely be the cause of your high blood glucose levels. Still looking for answers? Try searching for what you seek or ask your own question . The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. Available for Android and iOS devices. Subscribe to receive email notifications whenever new articles are published. Drugs.com provides accurate and independent information on more than 24,000 prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines and natural products. This material is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Data sources include Micromedex (updated Feb 28th, 2018), Cerner Multum (updated Mar 1st, 2018), Wolters Kluwer (updated Mar 1st, 2018) and others. To view content sources and attributions, please refer to our editorial policy . Continue reading >>

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