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I Don T Believe In Gestational Diabetes

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

. . . and don’t forget those vegetables. Healthy fats are essential, of course, and don’t skip meals! You dutifully nod your head, and then look down at the bottle of glucola that’s just been handed to you. All of a sudden you’re in a “choose your own adventure” story. Which path will you take? What are the risks and benefits of this test? Today I’m going to share my personal process in deciding whether or to take the oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). Please keep in mind that as I wrote in my posts on the vitamin K shot and Group B Strep, “Best Boo-Boo Kisser South Of Puckett’s Gas Station” is about as official as things get for me professionally. I am not a doctor, this is not medical advice, and your decision is completely up to you. If you need some convincing on this, read my full disclaimer where I say it over and over again. Okay, let’s jump in! What is gestational diabetes? Most doctors say we don’t really know why gestational diabetes happens, but there is a theory out there that makes a lot of sense to me personally, and it’s this: Before modern conveniences like grocery stores, people ate what grew in their backyard. Our ancestors’ staples were sometimes starch heavy (like the maca root consumed by Peruvians), and other times they were more fat and protein-based (like the Inuit). Our bodies do an amazing job adapting to whatever’s available, but there are certain things we all need to thrive. Glucose is a particularly essential nutrient for babies, but in some regions it can be scarce. According to this theory, our bodies adapted to the risk of scarcity by giving our babies preferential access to it during pregnancy. How does that work? As Chris Kresser has observed, “Pregnant women are naturally insulin resistant.” In other Continue reading >>

Show Topic - Huggies

Show Topic - Huggies

Anyone declined the gestational diabetes tests? I am 29 weeks pregnant and recently went to my midwife appointment, however, my usual midwife was absent so I had another one instead. She mentioned about me doing the glucose test and I informed her that I have discussed this previously with my doctor and midwife telling them that I will not be doing the test. She proceeded to ask me why not? and I told her personal choice. She sat there with shock in her face and once again asked "why not? did something happen in your family?". She was professional i get it but at the same time it made me feel like she wouldn't accept my answer. She said she would highly recommend i do the test. I told her i had decided not to as I don't want to feel like a guinea pig nor do i want to drink such a high sugared drink and be fasting, putting my baby under at all that. She then booked me for an upcoming growth scan (dunno if thats a norm or only if they believe ur baby is larger or smaller then they'd expect) Prior to this, she checked my blood pressure (which was good, as all my midwife, doctors etc appointments have had a good reading), was happy with the heart rate however when she measured me she got 29cm and this was 2 days before my 29 weeks. She said the baby is big to which i was slightly confused as the previous midwife and my sonographers at my (12 and 20 wk) ultrasound were all happy with the baby's progress), including when my usual midwife has measured me. I am 182cm and my husband is 197cm, so we are QUITE tall and my mum is around 165cm and has carried bigger babies and when she gave birth to me i was 6kg (yes KG not pounds :/) I generally keep a pretty healthy diet, 70% healthy the rest i have my days of indulgent. I've had my blood tests a few times and urine tests from my Continue reading >>

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis i'm glad i found this forum. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. was diagnosed by australian hospital 2wks ago to have gestational diabetes. not happy about it. will post more about it in a little bit. It is hard when you are first diagnosed, but you'll find this forum really helpful. I've been diabetic for ten years and there are things I've learnt through this forum that I've found so useful. Hi, you can manage this and have a healthy pregnancy. Lots of gd/diabetic mums here to help. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. i'm 20wks pregnant and was diagnosed (by a sydney hospital) with gestational diabetes 2 weeks ago. my problem is - i never had gestational diabetes. both my 5yo and 3yo were born in the uk - never had problems. now, australian hospital is telling me that i do have it. when i double-checked their proc, they're testing is different. they test 3x during the GTT (start, 1st hour and 2nd hour). with the nhs, they only test twice (start and on the 2nd hour). they caught my peak at the 1st hour (they said it should be 10, but was at 10.2). after that, they got me the accu metre and now have to test 4x a day. i saw the dietitian today and she asked me if i ever had gestational diabetes. i said never. and told her that if i were in the uk, i would have passed the GTT. then she said that the uk is still resistant to international changes (do you know what she's talking about?). after a few hours, nurse called me and told me that the doctor wants to put me on medication: tablets and insulin. i am not really happy about this =( Hi @sczaja Firstly, co Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

Does Gestational Diabetes Exist? - Mothering Forums

Does Gestational Diabetes Exist? - Mothering Forums

What do you think? I am almost to the point in my pregnancy when I am supposed to take the test, but I'm researching and researching it because I'm not convinced it's a real disorder. Of course it exists. I think the issue is that it's so prevalent due to the poor diets/exercise habits of most of the people in this country (well, and others I am sure!) I think it can be treated with diet and exercise, in most (not all) cases, as long as people are committed to the change and strictly follow a low GI diet along with exercise. Not a lot of people do that, including people who *think* they are eating naturally/healthily. My blood sugar was terrible when I was a vegitarian who ate "all natural" foods, cooking a lot of stuff myself. The whole low fat diet craze was one of the worst things to happen to women's diets in this country. Diabetes isn't, like, this big ON/OFF thing- like, you're one blip above the cutoff and all of a sudden you have it. I think a lot of people have poor blood sugar control, and resulting inflammation/problems with it. It's a gradual sliding scale more than a you have it/you don't issue. Perhaps this is what you refer to saying if it is a "real" disorder. Believe me, diabetes is a REAL DISORDER, and a lot of people's blood sugar control seriously worsens during pregancy- and that's GD. It is something worth watching, because it is so easy to make it better, at least in mild/moderate cases, and the first line suggested cure- low GI diet/exercise - is healthy anyway! There is an issue if you're borderline and, say, having a "diagnosis" of GD will shift you away from your midwives into the high risk OB group, for example. In that case, I think it's wise to follow a GI diet/exercise throughout the pregancy just as if you so have GD- and I think the tes Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Controversy

The Gestational Diabetes Controversy

This post is not necessarily about how to fix gestational diabetes – elevated blood sugar during pregnancy. Although, if you are suffering from this condition, I would advise consuming frequent, calorie-dense (warming) high-carb meals and snacks and getting as much rest, relaxation, and sleep as possible. Anything that you perceive as destressing will help. And that brings us to the first point that you should know, not just about pregnancy complications like preeclampsia and gestational diabetes, but most “conditions” and “diseases…” High blood sugar is an adaptive response. While this an oversimplification, stress impairs the ability of glucose to get into cells and trigger proper production of ATP. In response to this, blood sugar rises to overcompensate and deliver vital glucose. It’s not necessarily a condition to be waged war against. In fact, if you were to attempt to starve yourself of carbohydrates or other silliness to get this single number down, you would likely encounter a long list of declines in other areas, all signifying an intensification of stress activation, all much worse for the mother and the fetus than just allowing the body to manage the problem as it sees fit. Yes, this is a big 180 of course, to actually look at the body as intelligent, and trust even things like high blood sugar as being just a sign that something has gone awry rather than assuming it is the problem. Fever is a mechanism to fight disease, not something to be controlled. Swelling is a reaction to fight damaged tissue, not something to be suppressed with a block of ice. They may seem like problems on the surface, but the unifying theme is that there is a root cause of distress leading to such adaptive changes. Always look for root problems, and seek to understand Continue reading >>

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Thresholds For Diagnosing Gestational Diabetes

Hospitals do not have to use the recommendations listed below and so different targets for diagnosis are used all over the UK & Ireland. As a result, all this can cause a lot of confusion! Diagnosis test target levels England & Wales: Diagnose gestational diabetes if the woman has either: a fasting plasma glucose level of 5.6 mmol/litre or above or a 2‑hour plasma glucose level of 7.8 mmol/litre or above. [new 2015] Diagnosis test target levels Scotland: The adoption of internationally agreed criteria for gestational diabetes using 75 g OGTT is recommended: fasting venous plasma glucose ≥5.1 mmol/l, or one hour value ≥10 mmol/l, or two hours after OGTT ≥8.5 mmol/l. Women with frank diabetes by non-pregnant criteria (fasting venous glucose ≥7 mmol/l, two hour ≥11.1 mmol/l) should be managed within a multidisciplinary clinic as they may have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and be at risk of pregnancy outcomes similar to those of women with pre-gestational diabetes. Diagnosis test target levels Ireland: HSE guidelines: A diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made when one or more values are met or exceeded Fasting 5.1mmol/L 1 hour 10.0mmol/L 2 hour 8.5mmol/L Borderline diagnosis can have very different meanings when it comes to gestational diabetes. It could mean that following your GTT your fasting or post glucose levels were: Just below the threshold targets Bang on the threshold targets Just over the threshold targets Bearing in mind that test threshold levels differ from one hospital to another, this could be a huge difference in actual blood glucose levels and therefore what is classed as a borderline diagnosis in one hospital may be a clear positive diagnosis result in another. Our point of view is that if you have been told to monitor your blood glucose levels, Continue reading >>

The Gestational Diabetes Test Is Changing! - Raise Vegan

The Gestational Diabetes Test Is Changing! - Raise Vegan

The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test is the screening test for gestational diabetes, currently recommended by American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Diabetes Association. The woman in the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy is asked to drink an orange concentrated sugary drink. The base blood sugar level is compared with the blood sugar levels after every hour for three hours. If the blood sugar exceeds 130mg/dL, the woman is cautioned of possible gestational diabetes during later stages of pregnancy and asked to bring about dietary changes, including physical exercises and keeping a vigil on their blood sugar levels. The agony of a woman suffering nausea, morning sickness and having a dislike to intense flavors, is aggravated when she has to drink a sugary syrup to start with and sit through the long test and enduring the multiple jabs for the blood test. The test, in spite of its significance, has proven to have a reduced accuracy of 76%. The sensitivity and specificity of such a paramount test are questionable when it cannot pre-diagnose 24 out of every 100 women who go on to have gestational diabetes. The agony of a woman suffering nausea, morning sickness and having a dislike to intense flavors, is aggravated when she has to drink a sugary syrup to start with and sit through the long test and enduring the multiple jabs for the blood test. In such a scenario, the need of the hour is a reliable bio-marker which can act as an accurate predictor of gestational diabetes. Scientific research carried out at Brigham and Womens Hospital by Jose A Halperin , Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, have identified a complement regulatory protein, CD59, which gets glycated to form glycated-CD59 (GCD59) as a precursor to the diabetic condition. Exten Continue reading >>

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

Why Diet Is A Significant Cause Of Gestational Diabetes

As with many issues related to pregnancy and parenting, there are many myths and misconceptions about gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes has been a controversial topic for some time, with even world famous obesterician, Michel Odent, weighing in on the matter. Some medical and health professionals believe gestational diabetes (not to be confused with type 1 diabetes) is a “diagnosis looking for a disease”, because the steps to manage it is exactly the same as the advice to prevent it – with diet. Women diagnosed with gestational diabetes are given a label, without any evidence to show that the label improves outcomes. Low carb, high healthy fat eating, quitting smoking and exercise is how you prevent and treat insulin resistance. As Doctor Chatterjee says, “Our genes load the gun, but it's our environment that pulls the trigger”. Our addiction to sugar and processed foods is literally making us — and our future children — sick. If you haven't yet read about the 3 year old who was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, it's a must read. Women Need Educating, Not Testing A diagnosis of gestational diabetes results in the very advice which should already be given to all pregnant women — long before their glucose tolerance tests. They should eat a low GI diet, eliminate sugar and processed grains, as well as get some daily exercise. Very wise advice for all of us, regardless if we're pregnant or not. A recent study concluded, “A low GI diet was associated with less frequent insulin use and lower birth weight than control diets, suggesting that it is the most appropriate dietary intervention to be prescribed to patients with GDM [gestational diabetes mellitus].” However, the vast majority of doctors and midwives are not trained nutritionists, dieticians Continue reading >>

11 Myths About Gestational Diabetes That Moms-to-be Shouldn't Listen To

11 Myths About Gestational Diabetes That Moms-to-be Shouldn't Listen To

When you're expecting, chances are you hope to deliver a healthy, happy baby more than anything. But even lightly researching the many health conditions that may crop up during pregnancy is enough to spook even the strongest heart. To make matters worse, there are still plenty of misconceptions about common pregnancy conditions that linger online. For instance, there are myths about gestational diabetes that you may unknowingly believe. Although it may sound daunting, there's no reason to make the condition out to be something it isn't. That said, monitoring your health is crucial during pregnancy. And even if you've never had to think twice about blood sugar, gestational diabetes is now a possibility. Fortunately, even if you are diagnosed with the condition (and plenty of women are), you can work with your doctor to find the best way to manage your health. That may involve some chances to your diet and exercise regime, or even medication. Whatever the case, it helps to remember that you're not alone, the condition is manageable for most women, and it will end once you've given birth. Read on to learn how gestational diabetes is monitored, diagnosed, and treated, as well as some of the reasons it may develop. Myth #1: It's A Rare Condition giphy If you're diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you are far from alone. According to Baby Center, approximately 5 to 10 percent of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. Although the initial diagnosis may be a bit scary, it is a common condition that many pregnant women get through safely. Myth #2: You Can Control GD With Diet & Exercise giphy If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, then you may feel like it's your duty to control the condition completely with your own behavior. And sure, diet and exercise can Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

I’m a midwife and MD who specializes in the health and wellness of pregnant mommas. While I’m one of the original crunchy mamas, I got the science thing down tight in my medical training at Yale, so I can keep you informed on what’s safe, what’s not, and what are the best alternatives. This article, in which I take on the toxic ingredients in oral glucose test drinks, is the first in a 3-part series on gestational diabetes. If you’re pregnant, planning to be pregnant, or working with pregnant mommas – this series is for you! Is Gestational Diabetes Really an Issue? In the past decade obesity has become rampant in our country. With it the rates of diabetes in the general population, and gestational diabetes (GDM) – which is an excessive increase in glucose intolerance in pregnancy (some increase in glucose intolerance is actually normal and allows more sugar to get to the baby for growth) – have risen dramatically. Current estimates are that 5%-7% of pregnant women in the U.S. develop GDM. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a host of serious medical problems for mom and baby. However, at levels even lower than those that would qualify a woman for a GDM diagnosis, chronically elevated blood sugar also puts mom and baby at much higher risk of pregnancy and birth complications. Elevated blood sugar creates a condition in the body called “oxidative stress” and in pregnancy, which is already a state of somewhat increased oxidative stress, this can lead to high blood pressure, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Also, babies born to overweight or diabetic moms have a much higher lifetime likelihood of developing chronic health problems associated with obesity and diabetes. Women who develop GDM also have at least a 50% change of becoming diabetic later Continue reading >>

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes Back from my consultants appointment at the hospital and Im more confused than ever though, it has to be said, slightly elated. Before I go into what the consultant said, I must once again just stress the benefits of having gone to see a private obstetrician for a second opinion on everything. Twice. I know that this isnt a possibility for everyone, because it is expensive or, at least, more expensive than the NHS, which is free but for me it was one of the best 150 I have ever spent. OK, 300 in total, but for the extra insight into my pregnancy it gave me, worth every penny. (Im not knocking the NHS by any means they are overstretched and could never have given me the time and attention I got privately. Call itan enhancement to the service.) Because by the time I went into the consultants office, he had pored over the scan results and the baby measurements (which I was surprised by, because for some reason I assumed that he would be sniffy about me having gone for a second opinion) and almost instantly recommended I have a c-section due to the size of the baby and my previous emergency section. I could hardly believe my ears! Firstly, because I had been told last time that I wasnt having a big baby and secondly because I had also been told that women gave birth naturally to huge babies all the time and so it wasnt a valid reason for elective section. What a relief. Not to have to put my case across, or argue about induction rates and VBAC success rates and so on and his recommendation also took any decision-making out of my hands. (Almost. Because obviously, had I been the other way inclined then Im sure I could have argued for a VBAC, but I sort of felt as though he had sanctioned my own decision by also being of the Continue reading >>

Falling Off The Wagon

Falling Off The Wagon

Life happens and pregnancy hormones causing all sorts of emotions do not help. Add gestational diabetes diagnosis to the mix along with any other number of problems that could be going on and some ladies find themselves seeking comfort from eating or drinking certain things, resulting in a binge. Life will throw curve balls at us all the time, so the best thing to do is be prepared. If you rely on food for comfort then work out what things you can eat as a stress relief treat which will not spike your blood sugar levels. OR, even better, find alternative means of stress relief... Take a candle lit bath, let your partner give you a massage (or book a professional one if your partner is causing the stress!), go for a walk along the sea front or out in the country. Take some time out for you! Gestational diagnosis can make some ladies live on salad leaves and 'dust' every day. If you over restrict yourself then you can quickly feel deprived and depressed and it is only a matter of time before you crack. Check out our dietary advice which can be found here . It's based on eating little and often. As long as you follow the 8 golden rules then you should be able to eat a wide variety of foods and we can help you find alternatives to most things you are craving. You may find our dietary advice is not as restrictive as the advice you've been given at hospital and it could make a huge difference to the readings you get. Don't know the alternatives and bored of what you're eating? It's very easy to keep eating the same things over and over as they give good readings. But there will come a time when you get to the point of wanting to vomit when you put that same item of food you've been living on for weeks to your mouth. This could be the breaking point where ladies throw caution Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

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