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I Don T Believe I Have Gestational Diabetes

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

Falling Off The Wagon

Falling Off The Wagon

Life happens and pregnancy hormones causing all sorts of emotions do not help. Add gestational diabetes diagnosis to the mix along with any other number of problems that could be going on and some ladies find themselves seeking comfort from eating or drinking certain things, resulting in a binge. Life will throw curve balls at us all the time, so the best thing to do is be prepared. If you rely on food for comfort then work out what things you can eat as a stress relief treat which will not spike your blood sugar levels. OR, even better, find alternative means of stress relief... Take a candle lit bath, let your partner give you a massage (or book a professional one if your partner is causing the stress!), go for a walk along the sea front or out in the country. Take some time out for you! Gestational diagnosis can make some ladies live on salad leaves and 'dust' every day. If you over restrict yourself then you can quickly feel deprived and depressed and it is only a matter of time before you crack. Check out our dietary advice which can be found here . It's based on eating little and often. As long as you follow the 8 golden rules then you should be able to eat a wide variety of foods and we can help you find alternatives to most things you are craving. You may find our dietary advice is not as restrictive as the advice you've been given at hospital and it could make a huge difference to the readings you get. Don't know the alternatives and bored of what you're eating? It's very easy to keep eating the same things over and over as they give good readings. But there will come a time when you get to the point of wanting to vomit when you put that same item of food you've been living on for weeks to your mouth. This could be the breaking point where ladies throw caution Continue reading >>

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community hello =) Not Happy About Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis i'm glad i found this forum. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. was diagnosed by australian hospital 2wks ago to have gestational diabetes. not happy about it. will post more about it in a little bit. It is hard when you are first diagnosed, but you'll find this forum really helpful. I've been diabetic for ten years and there are things I've learnt through this forum that I've found so useful. Hi, you can manage this and have a healthy pregnancy. Lots of gd/diabetic mums here to help. i am a uk resident but based in australia at the moment. i'm 20wks pregnant and was diagnosed (by a sydney hospital) with gestational diabetes 2 weeks ago. my problem is - i never had gestational diabetes. both my 5yo and 3yo were born in the uk - never had problems. now, australian hospital is telling me that i do have it. when i double-checked their proc, they're testing is different. they test 3x during the GTT (start, 1st hour and 2nd hour). with the nhs, they only test twice (start and on the 2nd hour). they caught my peak at the 1st hour (they said it should be 10, but was at 10.2). after that, they got me the accu metre and now have to test 4x a day. i saw the dietitian today and she asked me if i ever had gestational diabetes. i said never. and told her that if i were in the uk, i would have passed the GTT. then she said that the uk is still resistant to international changes (do you know what she's talking about?). after a few hours, nurse called me and told me that the doctor wants to put me on medication: tablets and insulin. i am not really happy about this =( Hi @sczaja Firstly, co Continue reading >>

Excuse Me, Gestational Diabetes?

Excuse Me, Gestational Diabetes?

Let me start this post by saying that I cant believe Im writing it. When my doctors office called to say that I have gestational diabetes, I felt a mix of frustration, denial, anger and sadness but I think I was mostly super embarrassed. I had wanted to deny the dreaded glucose test, thinking theres no way I had diabetes and didnt want to drink that nasty sugary stuff. I went ahead and took the 2-hour test, and afterwards felt so awful that I was sure it was because I was so healthy that my body just wasnt used to that much sugar ;). I never expected to hear that I had failed the test! Guys, I dont fail tests! So how did I fail this one?! I felt like somebody handed me my pregnancy report card with a big fat F on it. Well, as Ive learned more about gestational diabetes, Ive learned there are many reasons you might get it. Ive also learned that it doesnt necessarily need to have the stigma that Ive attached to it in my head. After I found out that I had it, I started hearing stories of other people who also had it when they were pregnant people who I view as normal, healthy, active and responsible humans! While Im still a little embarrassed to be posting about it on here, I figure there must be other people who feel the same way I felt and would appreciate reading this. Ok, so heres how it works, as I understand it: normally, when you eat food, your pancreas produces insulin (which I didnt know is actually a hormone) that helps sugar move from your bloodstream into your cells to be processed as energy. However, when youre pregnant, your placenta produces high levels of other hormones that basically attack your insulin and make it so that the sugar in your blood cant be processed. If your blood sugar is consistently rising, it can start to affect you and your baby. In my Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect

Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect Gestational Diabetes: The Pregnancy Complication I Didn't Expect This mom found out late in her pregnancy that she had gestational diabetes and was shocked and in denial over her diagnosis, until she found the silver lining. I'd never failed a test in my whole life, and the very thought used to give me nightmares at school. That all changed when I was pregnant with my first baby. I failed the one-hour sugar test that screens expectant moms for gestational diabetes . And though I passed the subsequent three-hour version, I failed both of them again later in my pregnancy by just a number or two. It was confirmed, according to my doctor: I had GD. To say I was stunned and terribly upset would be an understatement. I'd been lucky enough to get pregnant over the age of 35 with no trouble at all, and things had been going so smoothly until then. I wasn't overweight and didn't have a history of diabetes in my family. I was exercising regularly, eating healthily, and had tons of energy. My only risk factor for gestational diabetes was my age, and I had no symptoms. So how could this be happening to me? I listened numbly over the phone as my OB delivered the bad news and informed me of what I had to do. I honestly couldn't believe it. The results had to be wrong. Maybe they got my sample mixed up with someone else's in the lab? Or maybe my doctor was being overzealous because of how old I was. Plus, I'd passed the three-hour screening earlier on. Wasn't that enough? I told her how upset I was and expressed my doubts about the accuracy of the diagnosis. She listened, but firmly stuck to her read of my condition. Eventually, I realized I had no choice but to accept it and do everything I was told to do. I had to pri Continue reading >>

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

Week 28: Testing Positive For Gestational Diabetes

How I'm changing up my routine as I head into the third trimester. I’m in the home stretch now. Just about 12 weeks (plus or minus) until I can finally meet my baby boy Finn! The main overriding themes right now are continued low back pain, and being sleepier than I have been. To help with the low back pain, I’ve employed an array of various pillows when I sleep. I don’t have the one many pregnant women seem to use—the full body pillow—but I do have the fantastic Boppy Pregnancy Wedge, which really does help me sleep better when I stick it under my belly. Besides that, I’m using my usual memory foam pillow under my head, and a regular cheap bed pillow between my knees. Although it’s a bit of a physical feat everytime I need to roll from one side to the other to arrange it all just-so, the pillow variety is keeping me comfortable enough to sleep through the night at the moment. My naps have increased in length and frequency. Now, it seems that I need a good 3 to 3 ½ hour nap at least 3 times a week. On the other days, I don’t nap at all. But when I do feel tired, it’s almost like I’ve been hit with a tranquilizer dart. Must lay down NOW! I am behind on some things I really need to get done, but I am not being too hard on myself about it. Everyone keeps telling me to enjoy the rest now, so that’s what I’m doing. A bigger piece of news to report: At 26 ½ weeks, my health care provider had me take the GTT, or glucose tolerance test, for gestational diabetes. I’ve been feeling so great that I really couldn’t believe it, but my test came back positive—just barely. Apparently, I’m just over the line into having the diagnosis. What exactly does this mean, I wondered. According to the American Diabetes Association, many pregnant women get it and Continue reading >>

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes

So Now Apparently I Dont Have Gestational Diabetes Back from my consultants appointment at the hospital and Im more confused than ever though, it has to be said, slightly elated. Before I go into what the consultant said, I must once again just stress the benefits of having gone to see a private obstetrician for a second opinion on everything. Twice. I know that this isnt a possibility for everyone, because it is expensive or, at least, more expensive than the NHS, which is free but for me it was one of the best 150 I have ever spent. OK, 300 in total, but for the extra insight into my pregnancy it gave me, worth every penny. (Im not knocking the NHS by any means they are overstretched and could never have given me the time and attention I got privately. Call itan enhancement to the service.) Because by the time I went into the consultants office, he had pored over the scan results and the baby measurements (which I was surprised by, because for some reason I assumed that he would be sniffy about me having gone for a second opinion) and almost instantly recommended I have a c-section due to the size of the baby and my previous emergency section. I could hardly believe my ears! Firstly, because I had been told last time that I wasnt having a big baby and secondly because I had also been told that women gave birth naturally to huge babies all the time and so it wasnt a valid reason for elective section. What a relief. Not to have to put my case across, or argue about induction rates and VBAC success rates and so on and his recommendation also took any decision-making out of my hands. (Almost. Because obviously, had I been the other way inclined then Im sure I could have argued for a VBAC, but I sort of felt as though he had sanctioned my own decision by also being of the Continue reading >>

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes?

Just Been Diagnosed With Gestational Diabetes?

If you've just been diagnosed with gestational diabetes you may be feeling shocked, upset, overwhelmed, guilty, distressed, in denial, or asking "why me?". It can be a daunting and very confusing time. What may have been the perfect pregnancy could feel completely shattered, or additional complications to an already difficult pregnancy may feel like the last straw for you. You may be completely unaware of gestational diabetes and may have stopped eating in fear of causing high blood sugar levels, consequently harming your baby. You may be worried this could mean a pregnancy which is filled with additional hospital appointments, medication, insulin injections, intervention and feel like you will not be able to have the pregnancy and birth you hoped for. You may be worrying that you will now be diabetic for the rest of your life. You may be very emotional and may spend days crying through fear of the unknown or due to reading or hearing too many horror stories linked to gestational diabetes. STOP!... I aim to share with you some information, support and tips based on frequently asked questions in our gestational diabetes Facebook support group. This information is written by myself as a mother who has been exactly where you are right now. I've experienced 2 gestational diabetes pregnancies, have been researching gestational diabetes for a few years now. I have helped and supported thousands of ladies over the past two years. You're not alone... Just need help with diet? If your main worry is dietary advice, scroll to the bottom of this page for lots of dietary links Let it sink in but try not to panic Being diagnosed with gestational diabetes is a BIG deal for most ladies. You may have no idea what it means and are just struck with absolute horror and fear over what this Continue reading >>

Does Gestational Diabetes Exist? - Mothering Forums

Does Gestational Diabetes Exist? - Mothering Forums

What do you think? I am almost to the point in my pregnancy when I am supposed to take the test, but I'm researching and researching it because I'm not convinced it's a real disorder. Of course it exists. I think the issue is that it's so prevalent due to the poor diets/exercise habits of most of the people in this country (well, and others I am sure!) I think it can be treated with diet and exercise, in most (not all) cases, as long as people are committed to the change and strictly follow a low GI diet along with exercise. Not a lot of people do that, including people who *think* they are eating naturally/healthily. My blood sugar was terrible when I was a vegitarian who ate "all natural" foods, cooking a lot of stuff myself. The whole low fat diet craze was one of the worst things to happen to women's diets in this country. Diabetes isn't, like, this big ON/OFF thing- like, you're one blip above the cutoff and all of a sudden you have it. I think a lot of people have poor blood sugar control, and resulting inflammation/problems with it. It's a gradual sliding scale more than a you have it/you don't issue. Perhaps this is what you refer to saying if it is a "real" disorder. Believe me, diabetes is a REAL DISORDER, and a lot of people's blood sugar control seriously worsens during pregancy- and that's GD. It is something worth watching, because it is so easy to make it better, at least in mild/moderate cases, and the first line suggested cure- low GI diet/exercise - is healthy anyway! There is an issue if you're borderline and, say, having a "diagnosis" of GD will shift you away from your midwives into the high risk OB group, for example. In that case, I think it's wise to follow a GI diet/exercise throughout the pregancy just as if you so have GD- and I think the tes Continue reading >>

Can A Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Be Wrong And Reversed?

Can A Diagnosis Of Gestational Diabetes Be Wrong And Reversed?

Can a diagnosis of gestational diabetes be wrong and reversed? JustMommies Message Boards Pregnancy High Risk Pregnancy Gestational Diabetes Can a diagnosis of gestational diabetes be wrong and reversed? Welcome to the JustMommies Message Boards. We pride ourselves on having the friendliest and most welcoming forums for moms and moms to be! Please take a moment and register for free so you can be a part of our growing community of mothers. If you have any problems registering please drop an email to [emailprotected] . Our community is moderated by our moderation team so you won't see spam or offensive messages posted on our forums. Each of our message boards is hosted by JustMommies hosts, whose names are listed at the top each board. We hope you find our message boards friendly, helpful, and fun to be on! I was diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes in my 9th week because of a combination of family history and a fasting number of 103. After being told that I'm not eating enough and I should have a snack 10 hours before testing my fasting number, I think I wasn't given the information to have an accurate diagnosis. I have been testing my numbers with the glucometer for 2 weeks, 4 times a day as I have been required and consistently, my fasting number has been in the 80s and I am within normal range after all meals (even after pancakes for breakfast and pizza for dinner). I don't think I have gestational diabetes. When I took my 8am hospital fasting number, I hadn't eaten since 6pm the night before so that could have given the wrong reading because my liver was producing the sugar. What can I do? Testing my blood so many times a day is just an inconvenience that I don't need right now. I would ask your Dr. to re-do the glucose test....Having to pick yourself that many time Continue reading >>

A Healthier Gestational Diabetes Test Alternative

A Healthier Gestational Diabetes Test Alternative

If you followed along with my last pregnancy, you’ll recall that I was required to consume the neon-orange colored glucose drink (not once, but twice!) to test for gestational diabetes. At the time, it was the only option my doctor would give me, and the way my health insurance worked back then I didn’t have a whole lot of options other than leaving my doctor and opting for a home birth– which we weren’t prepared to do. So I drank the drink and mentally apologized to my growing baby for flooding him with food dyes and preservatives that I would otherwise never consume. What a terrible practice to be forced on so many pregnant women! This time around, I was determined to find a better way. I have a new doctor for this pregnancy, and she knows how I feel about doing things as naturally as possible. (I think it helps that I already have one unmedicated hospital birth under my belt– I feel like doctors believe you more when you have already been through labor.) I told her how terrible my previous glucose testing experience had been, how I received a false positive with the one-hour test, how I felt terrible for nearly a week after my 3-hour test, and how I would really, really, really appreciate another option. And lucky for me, she gave me one. My Alternative Instead of ingesting a corn-derived, artificially-colored drink that I would most likely never consume on a normal basis, I’m simply testing my blood sugar four times a day using a glucose monitor for one week– when I hit the 30-week-mark in my pregnancy. Doesn’t that sound reasonable? What I love about this approach is that I get to see how my body handles the real food I eat on an everyday basis, which seems like it will provide a more accurate result anyway. The only downside is that I hate needles, Continue reading >>

11 Myths About Gestational Diabetes That Moms-to-be Shouldn't Listen To

11 Myths About Gestational Diabetes That Moms-to-be Shouldn't Listen To

When you're expecting, chances are you hope to deliver a healthy, happy baby more than anything. But even lightly researching the many health conditions that may crop up during pregnancy is enough to spook even the strongest heart. To make matters worse, there are still plenty of misconceptions about common pregnancy conditions that linger online. For instance, there are myths about gestational diabetes that you may unknowingly believe. Although it may sound daunting, there's no reason to make the condition out to be something it isn't. That said, monitoring your health is crucial during pregnancy. And even if you've never had to think twice about blood sugar, gestational diabetes is now a possibility. Fortunately, even if you are diagnosed with the condition (and plenty of women are), you can work with your doctor to find the best way to manage your health. That may involve some chances to your diet and exercise regime, or even medication. Whatever the case, it helps to remember that you're not alone, the condition is manageable for most women, and it will end once you've given birth. Read on to learn how gestational diabetes is monitored, diagnosed, and treated, as well as some of the reasons it may develop. Myth #1: It's A Rare Condition giphy If you're diagnosed with gestational diabetes, you are far from alone. According to Baby Center, approximately 5 to 10 percent of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. Although the initial diagnosis may be a bit scary, it is a common condition that many pregnant women get through safely. Myth #2: You Can Control GD With Diet & Exercise giphy If you are diagnosed with gestational diabetes, then you may feel like it's your duty to control the condition completely with your own behavior. And sure, diet and exercise can Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Medical experts haven't agreed on a single set of screening guidelines for gestational diabetes. Some question whether gestational diabetes screening is needed if you're younger than 25 and have no risk factors. Others say that screening all pregnant women is the best way to identify all cases of gestational diabetes. When to screen Your doctor will likely evaluate your risk factors for gestational diabetes early in your pregnancy. If you're at high risk of gestational diabetes — for example, your body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy was 30 or higher or you have a mother, father, sibling or child with diabetes — your doctor may test for diabetes at your first prenatal visit. If you're at average risk of gestational diabetes, you'll likely have a screening test during your second trimester — between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Routine screening for gestational diabetes Initial glucose challenge test. You'll drink a syrupy glucose solution. One hour later, you'll have a blood test to measure your blood sugar level. A blood sugar level below 130 to 140 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 7.2 to 7.8 millimoles per liter (mmol/L), is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab. If your blood sugar level is higher than normal, it only means you have a higher risk of gestational diabetes. You'll need a glucose tolerance test to determine if you have the condition. Follow-up glucose tolerance testing. You'll fast overnight, then have your blood sugar level measured. Then you'll drink another sweet solution — this one containing a higher concentration of glucose — and your blood sugar level will be checked every hour for three hours. If at least two of the blood sugar readings are higher than normal, you'll Continue reading >>

Causes Of Gestational Diabetes

Causes Of Gestational Diabetes

Researchers don't yet understand why some women get gestational diabetes and others don't. But we know that here are some risk factors that make it more likely and we have outlined these below. If you have one or more of these then you are more likely to get gestational diabetes but doctors do not yet know why. Although having a high BMI is a risk factor for gestational diabetes, slim women can also get it. To understand what causes gestational diabetes, it can help to understand how your body uses glucose. Your body needs some glucose in your blood to provide energy. The levels of blood glucose levels are kept at safe limits in your body, by a hormone called insulin. If your glucose level is too high, you may become unwell. When your blood glucose level is high (such as after a meal), insulin allows the extra glucose to be stored in your cells for later use. Then, when your blood glucose levels fall, another hormone (glucagon) releases some of that stored glucose to keep enough energy available to your body. When you are pregnant, your body produces high levels of hormones. Some of these hormones stop insulin working as well as it normally does. Usually, the body responds by increasing the amount of insulin it produces. However, some women do not produce enough of this extra insulin, resulting in gestational diabetes. "My health was fine until about 26 weeks into my pregnancy. Then at a routine appointment they noticed glucose in my urine, so they said they needed to do a test to rule out gestational diabetes. They told me I had it and asked me to attend the diabetic clinic the following day." Gemma, mum of one Risk factors for gestational diabetes You are more likely to develop gestational diabetes if: you had a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 before you became Continue reading >>

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