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Hypoglycemic Puppy Wont Eat

Yorkie, Pomeranians And Maltese Babies Must Eat

Yorkie, Pomeranians And Maltese Babies Must Eat

Congratulations on your new bundle of joy! Both Yorkies, Pomeranians and Maltese are very similar in their nature. They are very fun and loving breeds and can give you years and years of joy. However, these breeds especially the tinies ones have a need for a training manual . These babies are similar to human babies and will always crave your approval and love. There are a few things to learn about toy dogs that I wish to share with you that I learned about tinies over the years. Even more so with tinies . Maltese, Pomeranians and Yorkies are toy dogs and all toy dogs can have problems with sugar dropping by not eating. Your babyMUST EAT to keep the sugar level up. If he or she is homesick or has a stomach ache, it is up to you the pet parent to make sure they get sugar. You do this by giving a nickel sized amount of Nutri-Cal or mixing light Karo Syrup into some water. It’s always safe to have it on hand in case you need it. Give it by dabbing a small amount in the side of their mouth so they have to lick it off their gums.) That is for energy, for food I will give a very picky eater Gerber Chicken with Chicken Gravy. I try to get 6 CC’s about 4-5 times daily in a tiny puppy that is not eating their hard food interchangine with nutrical that should be given 3 times daily. I will also try organic plain yogurt with pure cane sugar to taste in it. Also Karo Syrup is good mixed in a little cottage cheese is also good option for picky eaters or stubborn babies that are in a rutt of not wanting to eat their kibble. If all else fails, make sure your baby sees a experienced tinies vet, not a vet without tinies experience your better off handling yourself than to take to a regular vet that takes ordinary steps on typical dog care, not the right move on these tinies. Tinies Continue reading >>

Maltese Puppy Wont Eat?

Maltese Puppy Wont Eat?

If her gums are white that’s not good, get her back to the vets in the a.m., or least give a call. I have a yorkie that”s what I’d do. how old is your puppy? give a 1/2 inch of the nutrical every 3-4 hours if she is under 12 weeks shame on the breeder but anywho i had a toy poodle that had the same problem try heating the food (not too hot!) sometimes that helps and also try mixing it with a little dry food or try dry food mixed with puppy milk feed her small meals every 3-4 hours as well also make sure she has acess to fresh water at all times one dish of regular water and one dish of water with a little caro syrup(no too much it will give her the poopies) or a couple tablespoons of pedialyte(no flavor if you can find it ) i hope this helps and good luck with your puppy Are you keeping her hydrated too? That’s important too. Is she eating willingly or do you need to make her eat? Have you tried to offer her raw ground beef? Sometimes dogs will eat this with a little more enthusiasm. Ensure is a beverage you can purchse that is loaded with calories. I like to have that on hand, Vanilla flavor, to give my dogs that aren’t eating. You could use the syringe to give her this too. Good recommendations: Hypoglycemia in General Hypoglycemia is a condition which occurs in humans and some animals when their blood sugar, or glucose, level falls below normal. Glucose is a form of sugar which is such an important fuel for the body, and especially the brain, that a deficiency can cause serious health problems. The main dietary sources of glucose are carbohydrate-rich foods such as grains, starchy vegetables, dairy products, fruits, and sweets.1 The pancreas assists in regulating blood glucose levels by producing insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. Increased pancrea Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Info

Hypoglycemia Info

Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is a possible problem with all toy breed puppies. Veterinarians unfamiliar with toys often mis-diagnose the condition as viral hepatitis or encephalitis. As a toy breeder or pet owner, it is important to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia and know how to treat it. Hypoglycemia is easily treatable in the early stages, but fatal if allowed to progress. Many puppies are lost needlessly to hypoglycemia because of ignorance on the part of their owner or veterinarian. The first sign of hypoglycemia is the puppy slowing down and then acting listless. The puppy will then begin to tremble or shiver. This is a reaction caused as the brain is starved for glucose. The trembling is followed by a blank stare and the puppy lying on his side. He may also experience convulsions. After a time, the puppy will become comatose. His body will be limp, lifeless, and the tongue and gums will be a grayish/blue color. The body temperature will be subnormal. The puppy may even appear to be dead. If caught in the early stages, treatment is simple. Rub Nutri-Cal (Caro syrup will do if you have no Nutri-Cal) on the puppy's gums, under the tongue, and on the roof of the mouth. (Caution: do not use honey.) Get a heating pad or heating blanket and slowly warm the puppy to proper body temperature. If the puppy responds, all is well. Feed a quality canned food right away (you may want to mix it with egg yolk) and then monitor the puppy to be sure that the condition does not recur. Be sure to eliminate the stress that caused the episode if at all possible. If caught in the more advanced stages, treatment is more complicated. Always assume that the puppy is alive. Rub Nutri-Cal or Caro in the mouth, and carefully insert a small amount in the rectum. Slowly warm the puppy Continue reading >>

How To Help A Sick Dog Who Won’t Eat

How To Help A Sick Dog Who Won’t Eat

Is your dog sick and refusing to eat? This can be a frightening experience for a pet owner and sometimes, there is a fairly simple remedy that will help a sick dog and encourage him to eat. If a dog doesn’t eat for a period of time, he will develop a condition known as hypoglycemia or low blood sugar. This can result in unpleasant sensations like weakness, shakiness and dizziness. In some cases, the initial problem that causes the dog to stop eating — such as an upset stomach — resolves on its own, but the pet may still refuse to eat due to the fact that he feels poorly as a result of hypoglycemia. Furthermore, when a dog doesn’t eat for an extended period of time, stomach acids may accumulate, resulting in nausea or a stomach ache. In other words, the longer a dog goes without eating, the less likely he is to resume eating. How to Get a Dog to Eat by Treating Hypoglycemia By treating hypoglycemia, you may be able to help your dog to resume eating. Try the following method to get your dog to eat: Give the dog maple syrup or honey. Offer 1 tablespoon per 20 pounds of body weight. Many dogs will lick the maple syrup or honey right off the spoon. If your dog refuses it, simply rub the syrup or honey onto the dog’s gums. Wait for 15 to 20 minutes, then offer a small amount of food. It can be helpful to offer something tempting like plain, skinless chicken or boiled hamburger meat (with the fat drained away), in addition to some plain white rice. Do not offer a large amount of food, as the dog will be prone to over-eating, since he may be quite hungry. Instead, offer a small meal, about one-fourth of the dog’s normal meal size every 2 to 3 hours for 12 hours. If your dog refuses the meal, wait approximately two hours and repeat the process of providing him with m Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

My 2 year old Maltese gets hypoglycemic from time to time. We've become good at guessing when it will happen, following activity-filled days, and we feed her Mighty Dog before it happens. She won't eat her dry food at these times. My concern is that it will happen while I'm not home and I won't be able to catch it. Does anyone else have this problem? Suggestions? Jen W. My Vet said that it is a common problem in small dogs because they do not eat enough to get enough sugar in their diet. He gave me a product called Nutri-Cal to prevent this from happening. It is a paste that you give them once or twice a day. It's major ingredient is corn syrup. The vet said that I could also just some corn syrup to his water, or put some on my finger and let him lick it off. I prefer the Nutri-Cal because it meets so many of a dogs nutritional needs, and it is easy to squirt a little in his mouth everyday. ChrisL When it begins, my dog usually gets the shakes and looks pitiful. If it really kicks in, she shakes quite visibly and hides in her crate or in a corner. This hiding behavior is not normal for her. Other symptoms include white gums, shock, and even death, if not treated. The cause is a drop in blood sugar. The treatment is to increase the blood sugar by feeding the dog honey, white corn syrup, Gatorade (gives a red mustache), or even sugar water. Anything high in sugar will work. Flurry won't eat food when she's really shakey but when we catch her early enough, she'll eat Mighty Dog. It works so well we call it "Super Dog!" Terri Continue reading >>

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Pets With Diabetes: Hypoglycemia

Signs Treatment Asymptomatic Hypo Be Prepared (how to carry a sugar supply) Exercise and hypo. Nigel Goes Hypo Hypo Humor References The most serious side effect of too much insulin is hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening, even fatal condition. Classic signs of hypoglycemia lethargy (lack of energy) weakness head tilting "drunkedness" - wobbling when walking, unbalanced hunger restlessness shivering ataxia - usually lack of muscular coordination, but maybe changes in head and neck movements disorientation stupor convulsions or seizures coma The occurrence of signs depends on how far the bg drops and on how fast the blood glucose drops. Owners of diabetic cats have also reported observing these signs sleepiness unable to wake the cat easily when it is sleeping. vomiting glassy eyes - it may look like it is staring into space laying, sleeping, or curled up in an unusual location of the house meowing, crying, yowling, or vocalizing in a way that is unusual for your cat some cats get aggressive drooling coughing Owners of diabetic dogs have also reported observing these signs sweating - check the nose and the paw pads. lip smacking or licking getting physically "stuck" in a place where the pet normally could get itself out (for example, behind a partially closed door that a pet would usually nudge open.) Some animals are asymptomatic at very low bg values. This means they do not show any of the usual signs of hypoglycemia even though their bg is very low. Read experiences of three pets who have had episodes of asymptomatic hypoglycemia. Be Prepared Always have corn syrup or sugar available. Corn syrup works well because it is a very pure sugar, and it is liquid. In the U.S. "Karo" is a brand name of corn syrup and you'll often see this Continue reading >>

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

4 Signs Of An Impending Diabetic Pet Emergency

Caring for a diabetic pet can be challenging, but there are certain precautions pet owners can take to prevent a diabetic emergency like hypoglycemia. Preventing a health crisis in a dog or cat with diabetes involves employing a consistent daily routine involving diet, exercise, insulin therapy, and supplementation. It also involves avoiding any and all unnecessary vaccinations. Even the most diligent pet parent can find himself facing a diabetic emergency with a dog or cat. Hypoglycemia is the most common health crisis, and is usually the result of an inadvertent overdose of insulin. Symptoms of hypoglycemia can appear suddenly and include lethargy or restlessness, anxiety or other behavioral changes, muscle weakness or twitching, seizures, coma, and death. At-home treatment for a diabetic pet with hypoglycemia is determined by whether or not the animal is alert. Signs of other potential impending diabetic emergencies include ketones in the urine; straining to urinate or bloody urine; vomiting or diarrhea; or a complete loss of appetite or reduced appetite for several days. By Dr. Becker Caring for a diabetic pet can be quite complex and time consuming. It involves regular monitoring of blood glucose levels, making necessary dietary adjustments, giving insulin injections or oral medications, and keeping a careful eye on your pet at all times. Frequent veterinary visits are the norm for dogs and cats with diabetes, as are the costs associated with checkups, tests, medical procedures, and insulin therapy. And unlike humans with the disease, our pets can’t tell us how they’re feeling or help in their own treatment and recovery. Preventing Diabetic Emergencies The key to preventing diabetic emergencies with a pet involves implementing a consistent daily routine and sti Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Puppy Food For A Chihuahua

What Is The Best Puppy Food For A Chihuahua

It is important to feed Chihuahua puppies a high-quality dry dog food that is specifically formulated for small-breed puppies. Chihuahua puppies should eat often, so it's necessary to keep the food within their reach. Chihuahuas are not necessarily picky eaters, and your puppy may be willing to swallow just about anything. This can create serious health problems, since puppies that don’t get the right balance of nutrients may not grow up to be healthy dogs. Malnourished Chihuahuas can develop skin problems and, puppies who miss a meal can even be at risk of death. To avoid an upset stomach, find out what the Chihuahua puppy has been eating at the breeder’s and have the same food ready before you bring the puppy home. If you want to change the puppy’s diet, do so gradually to avoid the digestive problems that often accompany a sudden change of food. According to the Chihuahua Club of America, Chihuahua puppies do best when you feed them a high-quality dry dog food that is formulated specifically for small-breed puppies. Since Chihuahua puppies are prone to hypoglycemia due to their small size, owners should leave the food where it is available to the puppies at all times. Frequent, small meals help to keep Chihuahua puppies healthy, and by keeping the food within the puppies’ reach they can snack whenever they want. Chihuahua breeders such as Steve and Lindy Nearman of Happy Trail Chihuahuas, who have been raising dogs since 1982, suggest that you feed Chihuahua puppies four times a day until they are three months old, then decrease to three times a day until they reach six months, after which you can cut back to feeding them twice a day. Make sure the kibble you use consists of tiny pieces so your Chihuahua puppy can’t choke on it. Custom Diet The Chihuahua Cl Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia & Your Yorkie

Hypoglycemia & Your Yorkie

HYPOGLYCEMIA & YOUR YORKIE As I said earlier, little puppies and even tiny mature dogs can have hypoglycemia attacks. The best thing to do is be prepared just in case. We have experienced it ourselves and luckily we were ready. Hopefully you will never have to deal with this scary event, but just in case, let us help you. What is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar, sometimes called “sugar shock.” It is a condition when blood sugar levels drop to an extremely low level What causes Hypoglycemia? It can be caused by not eating or using up all the stored sugar or energy in the body without it being replenished It may also be caused by stress, excessive heat, travel, nervousness, or extended play Yorkies are prone because they have such tiny digestive systems and they only store a small amount of energy in their bodies at a time It can be hereditary What are the symptoms? Vomiting on an empty stomach (clear liquid or bile) Acting listless, tired, not easily aroused Walking with an unsteady gait as if drunk, falling over, shaking uncontrollably Rubbing their face into the ground or furniture, stiffening up Laying on their side, paddling their feet and unable to get up You pick them up and they are limp as a dish rag, unable to open their eyes In severe cases, the puppy may already be comatose and totally unresponsive You must raise the blood sugar immediately or coma, brain damage and/or death will occur What is the treatment? Quickly give your puppy some form of nutrition containing sugar Some good examples are Nutraical, honey, granulated sugar, karo syrup, Quick Start or glucose Squirt it into the pups mouth, rub the neck slightly to enhance swallowing Put the sugar mixture on your finger and rub it on the inside of the pups cheeks as well If your puppy does Continue reading >>

Recommended Feeding For Shorkie Puppies

Recommended Feeding For Shorkie Puppies

Shorkies, also known as shorkie tzus or Yorkie tzus, are a hybrid dog breed obtained from Yorkshire terriers and shih-tzus. Both breeds are in the toy category, so the crossbreed falls under the toy category as well. The feeding schedule and amount of food puppies need is different from the requirements for adults. Shorkie puppies must also be fed frequently, to maintain their blood sugar at a normal level and prevent a hypoglycemic coma. Typically, the first four to eight weeks, shorkie puppies are with their mother and siblings and they receive dog milk from their mother. During the first four weeks, your puppy doesn't need anything else than dog milk. If the puppy is orphaned, buy dog milk replacer. Starting from week five, introduce a small portion of dry food, but dip it in water, so that the puppy digests it easily. Feed your shorkie permium dry food formulated for the growing stage of small-sized dogs. The food must ensure a harmonious skeletal and muscle development. The protein content of puppy food should be between 25 and 30 percent. Check if the ingredients are USDA inspected. When the puppy is 8 weeks old, it should eat only dry food. Small dogs such as shorkies reach maturity between the age of 9 and 12 months. When the puppy reaches maturity, it should get food for adults. The first weeks the puppy eats dog milk and it gets the necessary amounts from its mother. However, if the shorkie puppy is orphaned, you need to feed it replacer. Feed your puppy 1/4 of its weight at birth and change this amount as the puppy develops. When the puppy switches to solid food, feed it half a cup a day. When the puppy becomes an adult, it may eat less because it no longer develops, so 1/4 of a cup is sufficient. During the first four weeks, shorkies will breastfeed every tw Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Remember, your health guarantee does NOT cover hypoglycemia so it is imperative you read this information closely and stay on top of things. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar (sometimes called "sugar shock") is a condition where the blood sugar level drops to an extremely low level due to lack of food, or by using up all stored energy without it being replenished. (Such as when your puppy plays for an extended period of time without eating.) The most common trigger is stress (such as going to a new home). Teacups and Tiny Toys can be prone to hypoglycemia because they have such tiny digestive systems. They can only store a small amount of food (energy) in their stomach at one time. Their liver and pancreas which are necessary for digestion and sugar balance are also small and usually underdeveloped as well. Most puppies tend to grow out of hypoglycemia as they get older. As they grow, so do their major organs. This makes them more able to utilize and to process the food that they eat so it can sustain them for longer periods of time. REMEMBER: to prevent hypoglycemia, puppies need to eat several small meals a day. It is much easier to prevent by always having a readily available food supply, than to have to treat it once it happens. It is very scary to see a puppy that you love so dearly in "sugar shock." Symptoms and Treatment Symptoms of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can occur without warning in a healthy puppy and can be a very scary thing! So it is best to know what to look for! Your puppy may exhibit one or more of these signs: The first sign that is usually seen is vomiting on an empty stomach. (clear liquid) If your teacup has not eaten in a while, and vomits without acting sick, give them food, Nutri-Cal or Karo syrup immediately! Some other signs are acting listles Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

It is the concerned breeder that will be able to help prevent hypoglycemia I usually use corn syrup in their water. This will prevent low blood sugar. I usually use a high protein food such as Eukanuba small breed puppy. This food comes in moist or kibble form. It's great for Teacup breeds, because it has cane syrup, or what is sometimes called Molasses. You should also have some a tube of Neutrical or other vitamin supplement on hand. Be sure to put your puppies dish in the same spot and leave it down for 3-5 days if you notice that he isn't eating like you think he ought to eat: Unless your vet is accustomed to treating small animals he may spend much valuable time There has been times I would give some of the Neutrical and my little baby would seem ok It would help to give pedialite with a syringe 10cc 4 times a day, along with neutrical. This usually happens in a young puppy, or a tiny toy dog, this condition is usually hypoglycemia, brought on by stress or shock in some form. Also, it usually occurs in puppies from 4 to 5 months of age but CAN occur in mature toy breeds when they are subjected to STRESS. This is why I recommend the playpen care. It helps your little baby be accustomed to the way it was treated at my home The puppy will appear limp and lifeless with the gums and tongue usually grayish blue in color. Often the eyes are unfocused and barely open. They may appear to be slightly sunken in. Temperature will be subnormal and the puppy will be shivering and trembling in the early stages. As condition worsens, the puppy either goes into a coma or convulsions. Hypoglycemia is a metabolic disorder and death will result, unless properly DIAGNOSED AND CARED FOR IMMEDIATELY, if the case is severe. The level of the blood sugar must be raised at once and the stres Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low blood sugar can affect puppies much more often than adult dogs, even when your puppy is healthy, so it's important to learn about low blood sugar symptoms and what to do. The technical term is hypoglycemia and happens most often with adult pets that suffer from diabetes. Sugar moves into the cells with the help of insulin, and too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia. Puppies almost never have diabetes, but can develop low blood sugar due to intestinal parasites that compromise digestion. Very small puppies, especially Toy breeds like the Chihuahua or Pomeranian, are so tiny, they have very few fat stores. Fat is body fuel, and when there’s not enough, the blood sugar levels fall. Adult pets can make up this difference when their liver churns out the necessary sugar. But immature livers can’t manufacture enough necessary sugar and as a result, these tiny pups develop hypoglycemia. What Are Low Blood Sugar Symptoms? The signs of low blood sugar can be vague. It’s important to watch out for them especially if your puppy is a tiny breed that’s most susceptible. Without enough sugar, the puppy’s heartbeat rate and breathing slow down and that triggers a cascade effect of other symptoms. Be alert for any one or combination of the following signs. The puppy acts weak. The puppy becomes sleepy. The puppy seems disoriented. He develops a wobbly “drunk” gait. His eyes look ‘glassy’ and unfocused. The puppy starts to twitch, shake or tremble/shiver. His head tilts to one side. He develops seizures. The puppy falls unconscious and can’t be awakened. Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. But fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to treat and reverse at home. In almost all cases, the pup Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Requires Quick Intervention In Toy And Small Breeds

Hypoglycemia Requires Quick Intervention In Toy And Small Breeds

Used with permission from the Purina Pro Club SHih Tzu Update, Nestle Purina PetCare. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can quickly become an urgent health problem in toy and small-breed dogs, say experts. Without intervention, there is risk of dogs slipping into a coma and possibly dying. Like other small breeds, Shih Tzu puppies are vulnerable to hypoglycemia, especially during weaning. Juvenile hypoglycemia, which is seen in puppies less than 3 months of age, generally occurs because puppies have not fully developed the ability to regulate blood glucose concentration and have a high requirement for glucose. Carling Shih Tzu breeder Carlene Snyder, chairwoman of the American Shih Tzu Club’s Health, Education and Research Committee, says puppies that develop the condition simply appear “not right.” “We recommend that breeders do not allow puppies to go to new homes until they are at least 12 weeks old,” Snyder says. “By this age they weigh about 6 pounds. Though we don’t hear too often about hypoglycemia occurring in Shih Tzu, it can happen, especially in puppies that go to homes as early as 6 weeks of age.” Breeders of toy dogs, such as Chihuahuas, know to look for signs of hypoglycemia because low blood sugar can occur quickly and commonly. Jennifer Smolarz of Chesterfield, Mich., breeds under the Whisper Chihuahuas prefix. When her puppy, “Laney,” was only 8 weeks of age, she suffered a hypoglycemic attack. “She should have been happy and alert but instead she was listless, not eating or drinking, and just wouldn’t get up,” Smolarz recalls. “I knew something was wrong, but I wasn’t sure what to do.” She called one of her mentors who helped her get started in breeding and described the puppy’s condition. “She knew exactly what was Continue reading >>

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