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Hypoglycemic Puppy Wont Eat

Maltese Puppy Wont Eat?

Maltese Puppy Wont Eat?

If her gums are white that’s not good, get her back to the vets in the a.m., or least give a call. I have a yorkie that”s what I’d do. how old is your puppy? give a 1/2 inch of the nutrical every 3-4 hours if she is under 12 weeks shame on the breeder but anywho i had a toy poodle that had the same problem try heating the food (not too hot!) sometimes that helps and also try mixing it with a little dry food or try dry food mixed with puppy milk feed her small meals every 3-4 hours as well also make sure she has acess to fresh water at all times one dish of regular water and one dish of water with a little caro syrup(no too much it will give her the poopies) or a couple tablespoons of pedialyte(no flavor if you can find it ) i hope this helps and good luck with your puppy Are you keeping her hydrated too? That’s important too. Is she eating willingly or do you need to make her eat? Have you tried to offer her raw ground beef? Sometimes dogs will eat this with a little more enthusiasm. Ensure is a beverage you can purchse that is loaded with calories. I like to have that on hand, Vanilla flavor, to give my dogs that aren’t eating. You could use the syringe to give her this too. Good recommendations: Hypoglycemia in General Hypoglycemia is a condition which occurs in humans and some animals when their blood sugar, or glucose, level falls below normal. Glucose is a form of sugar which is such an important fuel for the body, and especially the brain, that a deficiency can cause serious health problems. The main dietary sources of glucose are carbohydrate-rich foods such as grains, starchy vegetables, dairy products, fruits, and sweets.1 The pancreas assists in regulating blood glucose levels by producing insulin, which lowers blood glucose levels. Increased pancrea Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Can Kill A Puppy

Low Blood Sugar Can Kill A Puppy

“Puppy Passed Out, Shaking, Won’t Get Up!” A 12-week-old female Maltese puppy curled up in an unnatural position in the middle of a dirty pink kitchen towel. Slimey drool and corn syrup stuck all over her chin and her whiskers. Her little eyes shut tightly, she barely breathed. Then her paw twitched spastically. (There is no picture of this because Yours Truli, VirtuaVet, was running down the hospital hallway to the treatment room, “Get the Dextrose solution and the I.V., STAT!” No time for pictures when a little life is on the line.) Shasta needed sugar desperately to keep her brain functioning. The body itself can run on replacement molecules, for example: ketones. The brain, however, needs glucose, a particular kind of sugar easily obtainable from food. If the brain does not receive the glucose it needs, the symptoms of low blood sugar rear up. After 15 minutes, her eyes open, breathing smooths, seizures subside, and a puppy might look like Shasta did: Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar in a Puppy (or Rabbit, or Kitten, or…) Weakness Confusion Incoordination Falling Over Tremors, Spastic Movements, Falling Over Twitches, Seizures Coma Death Dog Breeds Likely to Become Hypoglycemic Yorkshire Terrier Chihuahua Maltese Toy Poodle Shih Tzu Miniature Pinscher Toy Terrier Papillon Japanese Chin Pomeranian any tiny breed destined for 10 pounds or less full grown… Low Blood Sugar Treatment Your puppy will perk right up with glucose in its system. Sources of Sugar for your Puppy in an Emergency: NutriCal Karo syrup (corn syrup) Molasses Maple syrup (pancake syrup, too) Barley Malt Brown Rice Syrup If your puppy gets to the veterinarian before you know what’s going on, the veterinarian will give dextrose, a clean, safe, medical form of sugar that is given by mouth or Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low Blood Sugar In Puppies

Low blood sugar can affect puppies much more often than adult dogs, even when your puppy is healthy, so it's important to learn about low blood sugar symptoms and what to do. The technical term is hypoglycemia and happens most often with adult pets that suffer from diabetes. Sugar moves into the cells with the help of insulin, and too much insulin can cause hypoglycemia. Puppies almost never have diabetes, but can develop low blood sugar due to intestinal parasites that compromise digestion. Very small puppies, especially Toy breeds like the Chihuahua or Pomeranian, are so tiny, they have very few fat stores. Fat is body fuel, and when there’s not enough, the blood sugar levels fall. Adult pets can make up this difference when their liver churns out the necessary sugar. But immature livers can’t manufacture enough necessary sugar and as a result, these tiny pups develop hypoglycemia. What Are Low Blood Sugar Symptoms? The signs of low blood sugar can be vague. It’s important to watch out for them especially if your puppy is a tiny breed that’s most susceptible. Without enough sugar, the puppy’s heartbeat rate and breathing slow down and that triggers a cascade effect of other symptoms. Be alert for any one or combination of the following signs. The puppy acts weak. The puppy becomes sleepy. The puppy seems disoriented. He develops a wobbly “drunk” gait. His eyes look ‘glassy’ and unfocused. The puppy starts to twitch, shake or tremble/shiver. His head tilts to one side. He develops seizures. The puppy falls unconscious and can’t be awakened. Without prompt attention and first aid, your puppy could die. But fortunately, when you recognize the signs early in the process, low blood sugar is easy to treat and reverse at home. In almost all cases, the pup Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

Remember, your health guarantee does NOT cover hypoglycemia so it is imperative you read this information closely and stay on top of things. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar (sometimes called "sugar shock") is a condition where the blood sugar level drops to an extremely low level due to lack of food, or by using up all stored energy without it being replenished. (Such as when your puppy plays for an extended period of time without eating.) The most common trigger is stress (such as going to a new home). Teacups and Tiny Toys can be prone to hypoglycemia because they have such tiny digestive systems. They can only store a small amount of food (energy) in their stomach at one time. Their liver and pancreas which are necessary for digestion and sugar balance are also small and usually underdeveloped as well. Most puppies tend to grow out of hypoglycemia as they get older. As they grow, so do their major organs. This makes them more able to utilize and to process the food that they eat so it can sustain them for longer periods of time. REMEMBER: to prevent hypoglycemia, puppies need to eat several small meals a day. It is much easier to prevent by always having a readily available food supply, than to have to treat it once it happens. It is very scary to see a puppy that you love so dearly in "sugar shock." Symptoms and Treatment Symptoms of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can occur without warning in a healthy puppy and can be a very scary thing! So it is best to know what to look for! Your puppy may exhibit one or more of these signs: The first sign that is usually seen is vomiting on an empty stomach. (clear liquid) If your teacup has not eaten in a while, and vomits without acting sick, give them food, Nutri-Cal or Karo syrup immediately! Some other signs are acting listles Continue reading >>

Yorkie, Pomeranians And Maltese Babies Must Eat

Yorkie, Pomeranians And Maltese Babies Must Eat

Congratulations on your new bundle of joy! Both Yorkies, Pomeranians and Maltese are very similar in their nature. They are very fun and loving breeds and can give you years and years of joy. However, these breeds especially the tinies ones have a need for a training manual . These babies are similar to human babies and will always crave your approval and love. There are a few things to learn about toy dogs that I wish to share with you that I learned about tinies over the years. Even more so with tinies . Maltese, Pomeranians and Yorkies are toy dogs and all toy dogs can have problems with sugar dropping by not eating. Your babyMUST EAT to keep the sugar level up. If he or she is homesick or has a stomach ache, it is up to you the pet parent to make sure they get sugar. You do this by giving a nickel sized amount of Nutri-Cal or mixing light Karo Syrup into some water. It’s always safe to have it on hand in case you need it. Give it by dabbing a small amount in the side of their mouth so they have to lick it off their gums.) That is for energy, for food I will give a very picky eater Gerber Chicken with Chicken Gravy. I try to get 6 CC’s about 4-5 times daily in a tiny puppy that is not eating their hard food interchangine with nutrical that should be given 3 times daily. I will also try organic plain yogurt with pure cane sugar to taste in it. Also Karo Syrup is good mixed in a little cottage cheese is also good option for picky eaters or stubborn babies that are in a rutt of not wanting to eat their kibble. If all else fails, make sure your baby sees a experienced tinies vet, not a vet without tinies experience your better off handling yourself than to take to a regular vet that takes ordinary steps on typical dog care, not the right move on these tinies. Tinies Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

What To Do If Your Diabetic Dog Won't Eat

A diabetic dog who will not eat is not something to ignore. Many diabetic canines are given insulin shots to control their blood sugar levels, but giving insulin to a dog who has not eaten for some time can be extremely dangerous. It is never advised to give an insulin injection to your pet if he hasn't eaten his food. To learn more about what to do if your diabetic dog won't eat, read on. Insulin Injections and Diabetic Dogs As stated previously, many canines with diabetesare given insulin injections to control blood sugar levels. Insulin injections may be important when treating diabetes in your pet, in combination with the proper diet and exercise . But when a diabetic dog hasn't eaten, however, insulin therapy can be very dangerous. Insulin is a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood, and giving a dog insulin when he has an empty stomach can cause hypoglycemia very quickly. The dangers of the hypoglycemia would be far worse than the dangers of missing an injection of insulin. Hypoglycemia can rapidly lead to death in dogs, which is why it is advised that pet owners skip an insulin injection if their pet hasn't eaten his meal. How Do I Get My Diabetic Dog to Eat? If your pet is ignoring his food or seems uninterested in it, pet owners should try mixing a small amount of wet canned food into the dry food. They should make sure that each piece of the dry dog food is coated with the wet food. If your pet does eat, you may then give him the insulin injection. If he still does not eat, do not give the injection. Your pet may experience high blood sugar for a very short time, but it will not be enough to cause harm. If your pet continues to have a decrease in appetite and will not eat, immediately consult your veterinarian. Especially in diabetic dogs, the prope Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia & Your Yorkie

Hypoglycemia & Your Yorkie

HYPOGLYCEMIA & YOUR YORKIE As I said earlier, little puppies and even tiny mature dogs can have hypoglycemia attacks. The best thing to do is be prepared just in case. We have experienced it ourselves and luckily we were ready. Hopefully you will never have to deal with this scary event, but just in case, let us help you. What is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar, sometimes called “sugar shock.” It is a condition when blood sugar levels drop to an extremely low level What causes Hypoglycemia? It can be caused by not eating or using up all the stored sugar or energy in the body without it being replenished It may also be caused by stress, excessive heat, travel, nervousness, or extended play Yorkies are prone because they have such tiny digestive systems and they only store a small amount of energy in their bodies at a time It can be hereditary What are the symptoms? Vomiting on an empty stomach (clear liquid or bile) Acting listless, tired, not easily aroused Walking with an unsteady gait as if drunk, falling over, shaking uncontrollably Rubbing their face into the ground or furniture, stiffening up Laying on their side, paddling their feet and unable to get up You pick them up and they are limp as a dish rag, unable to open their eyes In severe cases, the puppy may already be comatose and totally unresponsive You must raise the blood sugar immediately or coma, brain damage and/or death will occur What is the treatment? Quickly give your puppy some form of nutrition containing sugar Some good examples are Nutraical, honey, granulated sugar, karo syrup, Quick Start or glucose Squirt it into the pups mouth, rub the neck slightly to enhance swallowing Put the sugar mixture on your finger and rub it on the inside of the pups cheeks as well If your puppy does Continue reading >>

Recommended Feeding For Shorkie Puppies

Recommended Feeding For Shorkie Puppies

Shorkies, also known as shorkie tzus or Yorkie tzus, are a hybrid dog breed obtained from Yorkshire terriers and shih-tzus. Both breeds are in the toy category, so the crossbreed falls under the toy category as well. The feeding schedule and amount of food puppies need is different from the requirements for adults. Shorkie puppies must also be fed frequently, to maintain their blood sugar at a normal level and prevent a hypoglycemic coma. Typically, the first four to eight weeks, shorkie puppies are with their mother and siblings and they receive dog milk from their mother. During the first four weeks, your puppy doesn't need anything else than dog milk. If the puppy is orphaned, buy dog milk replacer. Starting from week five, introduce a small portion of dry food, but dip it in water, so that the puppy digests it easily. Feed your shorkie permium dry food formulated for the growing stage of small-sized dogs. The food must ensure a harmonious skeletal and muscle development. The protein content of puppy food should be between 25 and 30 percent. Check if the ingredients are USDA inspected. When the puppy is 8 weeks old, it should eat only dry food. Small dogs such as shorkies reach maturity between the age of 9 and 12 months. When the puppy reaches maturity, it should get food for adults. The first weeks the puppy eats dog milk and it gets the necessary amounts from its mother. However, if the shorkie puppy is orphaned, you need to feed it replacer. Feed your puppy 1/4 of its weight at birth and change this amount as the puppy develops. When the puppy switches to solid food, feed it half a cup a day. When the puppy becomes an adult, it may eat less because it no longer develops, so 1/4 of a cup is sufficient. During the first four weeks, shorkies will breastfeed every tw Continue reading >>

Dog Weakness And Lethargy: Causes And Treatments

Dog Weakness And Lethargy: Causes And Treatments

Lethargy and weakness -- these are vague but common symptoms of illness in dogs. And many things, some of them quite serious, can make your dog weak or lethargic. Here's information about the most common conditions, how they are treated, and when your dog should see a vet. When to See a Vet Things that can make your dog lethargic and weak can range from infection and disease to pain and medication. And because weakness and lethargy can indicate anything from a chronic condition to a life-threatening illness, you should always talk to your vet when you notice either symptom. Dog Weakness and Lethargy: Common Causes and Treatments A few of the more common causes of weakness or lethargy in dogs include the following: Infection. Any kind of infection -- including serious ones such as parvovirus, distemper, kennel cough, leptospirosis, and heartworm disease -- can make your dog lethargic. Parvovirus is spread through feces. Symptoms of parvo can include lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Treatment includes aggressive supportive care with fluids, anti-nausea medications, and antibiotics. Distemper can cause symptoms such as fever, lethargy, discharge from the eyes and nose, and coughing. It may cause neurological problems. The signs of distemper are broad and vary from dog to dog. Treatment may include antibiotics, fluids, and anticonvulsants. Kennel coughis a contagious respiratory disease. Its most distinctive symptom is a dry, honking cough. Dogs with kennel cough can be lethargic and feverish. Treatments may include cough suppressants, antibiotics, and bronchodilators. Heartworm disease is caused by heartworms that find their way into your dog through mosquito bites. Symptoms of heartworm infection can include lethargy, depression, fever, and weakness. Prev Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Hypoglycemia In Dogs

How To Prevent Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Expert Reviewed Blood sugar acts as the main energy source for your dog, and hypoglycemia is a condition where your dog has low blood sugar levels. This can occur when a diabetic dog is given too much insulin, or the dog has a health problem, or your dog needs to eat more. If your dog's blood sugar drops, it can cause lethargy and even loss of consciousness. Learn how to prevent this condition to protect your dog. 1 Feed small dogs often. Toy breeds and puppies require more glucose than larger dogs, so they are more susceptible to hypoglycemia. To avoid this, feed your small dog often.[1] Feed your dog a meal high in quality protein[2], high in fat, with complex carbs, like white rice.[3][4] Make sure to keep small dogs warm if they are underweight or don’t eat. 2 Limit stress for puppies. Puppies under three months old can get hypoglycemia because they haven’t developed enough to regulate their blood sugar. Because of this, stress can bring on hypoglycemia. Limit stressors, such as poor nutrition, cold environments, and intestinal parasites.[5] 3 Feed your dog more before high levels of activity. If your dog is going to be engaging in high levels of activity, such as hunting, then you need to feed him beforehand. Give him food a few hours before the activity. The food should be high in protein and fat.[6] Intense exercise when a dog hasn’t eaten can cause hypoglycemia. Don't strenuously exercise a dog who has just eaten a meal, as this can cause bloating. Wait at least 90 minutes after feeding before exercising your dog. 4 Monitor dogs with conditions related to hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is associated with certain conditions. If your dog has diabetes mellitus, she may develop hypoglycemia if she does not eat and is then given a dose of insulin, or is given too l Continue reading >>

Yorkie Hypoglycemia

Yorkie Hypoglycemia

You’ve no doubt heard the term “hypoglycemia” as it refers to humans, and you probably know that it is related to diabetes and blood sugar. But, what do you know about hypoglycemia as it applies to your Yorkie? Hypoglycemia is a potentially deadly condition that can be prevented. Every Yorkie owner and potential Yorkie owner should educate themselves about the dangers of hypoglycemia in Yorkies. Like many toy breeds, Yorkies are prone to hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the body cannot regulate blood glucose, and the blood sugar concentration in the body is too low. In dogs, a normal blood sugar level is somewhere around 70 – 150 mg/dL, and hypoglycemia is usually considered anything under 50 mg/dL. The actual reference ranges for “normal” blood glucose levels vary. The main concern with Yorkie puppies is Transient Juvenile Hypoglycemia. Transient juvenile hypoglycemia is due to a lack of adequate nutrition and proper intake of glucose (sugar). In essence, this type of hypoglycemia is a result of fasting (not eating). This type of hypoglycemia generally effects puppies under the age of 4 months. Causes: Transient Juvenile Hypoglycemia in Yorkies is commonly accepted to be caused by fasting. Many laboratory experiments have been conducted, and the generally accepted time-frame for hypoglycemia is about 8 hours of fasting. For smaller puppies, the critical time frame can be less. So, if your Yorkie doesn’t eat for a period of 8 hours and is under the age of 4 months, a hypoglycemic attach is almost a certainty. Make sure that your Yorkie is eating properly! Fasting in a Yorkie puppy is usually not intentional on the part of the owner or the puppy themselves. There are, however, a number of reasons why a Yorkie puppy may be unable to or refu Continue reading >>

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

Give Me Some Sugar! Canine Low Blood Sugar–symptoms And Treatments

There is a dog blood-glucose disorder that goes by three names: Canine Hypoglycemia , Exertional Hypoglycemia and Sugar Fits. These names refer to one single condition: cells in your canine’s body aren’t receiving the needed amount of glucose. Your dog’s energy is derived from glucose that is supplied by the blood, but with Canine Hypoglycemia, blood glucose levels lower than 70 mg/dL should be cause for concern and are considered increasingly dangerous, of course, as the numbers go down. The normal level is 70-150 mg/dL. Different factors enter into the cause, but if you suspect your beloved family member might be diabetic, it’s important to have your canine-cutie diagnosed properly, and quickly, since untreated hypoglycemia can, ultimately, result in seizure/coma and death. Symptoms Of Canine Hypoglycemia: Disorientation or confusion Trembling lip Seizures (dogs 4 or over are more prone) Weakness-shakiness-dizziness Anxiety Lack-luster personality/lethargy/depression Prevention/Treatment: Obviously, the goal is to raise your pet’s blood-sugar level or maintain normal sugar levels; and this can be achieved in several ways: Feed your pet smaller, more frequent meals. There is a food supplement known as PetAlive GlucoBalance which aides in pancreatic and liver functions. Smaller meals, plus the PetAlive, can potentially correct the problem, but a blood test from your pet’s vet is required to properly determine if this regime-change will have made a difference. Treats should be avoided, at this time, unless permitted by your dog’s doctor. If you suspect your canine’s blood sugar is low, visiting the vet is crucial. The vet will, automatically, check blood-sugar levels. If necessary, a form of glucose will be fed intravenously -directly into the bloodstream Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

My 2 year old Maltese gets hypoglycemic from time to time. We've become good at guessing when it will happen, following activity-filled days, and we feed her Mighty Dog before it happens. She won't eat her dry food at these times. My concern is that it will happen while I'm not home and I won't be able to catch it. Does anyone else have this problem? Suggestions? Jen W. My Vet said that it is a common problem in small dogs because they do not eat enough to get enough sugar in their diet. He gave me a product called Nutri-Cal to prevent this from happening. It is a paste that you give them once or twice a day. It's major ingredient is corn syrup. The vet said that I could also just some corn syrup to his water, or put some on my finger and let him lick it off. I prefer the Nutri-Cal because it meets so many of a dogs nutritional needs, and it is easy to squirt a little in his mouth everyday. ChrisL When it begins, my dog usually gets the shakes and looks pitiful. If it really kicks in, she shakes quite visibly and hides in her crate or in a corner. This hiding behavior is not normal for her. Other symptoms include white gums, shock, and even death, if not treated. The cause is a drop in blood sugar. The treatment is to increase the blood sugar by feeding the dog honey, white corn syrup, Gatorade (gives a red mustache), or even sugar water. Anything high in sugar will work. Flurry won't eat food when she's really shakey but when we catch her early enough, she'll eat Mighty Dog. It works so well we call it "Super Dog!" Terri Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, it's possible to induce coma, seizures,brain damage[1][2][3] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen[4], it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors.[5] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness[6]. An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper function. The more active muscles become, the more their need for glucose increases[7]. Conversely, there can also be hyperglycemic reactions from this; it depends on the individual/caregiver knowing him/herself and the pet's reactions. According to a 2000 JAVMA study, dogs receiving insulin injections only once daily at high doses[9] are more likely to have hypoglycemic episodes than those who receive insulin twice daily. The symptoms Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Info

Hypoglycemia Info

Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is a possible problem with all toy breed puppies. Veterinarians unfamiliar with toys often mis-diagnose the condition as viral hepatitis or encephalitis. As a toy breeder or pet owner, it is important to recognize the symptoms of hypoglycemia and know how to treat it. Hypoglycemia is easily treatable in the early stages, but fatal if allowed to progress. Many puppies are lost needlessly to hypoglycemia because of ignorance on the part of their owner or veterinarian. The first sign of hypoglycemia is the puppy slowing down and then acting listless. The puppy will then begin to tremble or shiver. This is a reaction caused as the brain is starved for glucose. The trembling is followed by a blank stare and the puppy lying on his side. He may also experience convulsions. After a time, the puppy will become comatose. His body will be limp, lifeless, and the tongue and gums will be a grayish/blue color. The body temperature will be subnormal. The puppy may even appear to be dead. If caught in the early stages, treatment is simple. Rub Nutri-Cal (Caro syrup will do if you have no Nutri-Cal) on the puppy's gums, under the tongue, and on the roof of the mouth. (Caution: do not use honey.) Get a heating pad or heating blanket and slowly warm the puppy to proper body temperature. If the puppy responds, all is well. Feed a quality canned food right away (you may want to mix it with egg yolk) and then monitor the puppy to be sure that the condition does not recur. Be sure to eliminate the stress that caused the episode if at all possible. If caught in the more advanced stages, treatment is more complicated. Always assume that the puppy is alive. Rub Nutri-Cal or Caro in the mouth, and carefully insert a small amount in the rectum. Slowly warm the puppy Continue reading >>

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