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Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia In Dogs

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormal decrease of glucose concentration in the blood, or more simply - low blood sugar levels. A normal blood glucose value for healthy, non-diabetic dogs is 3.3-6.1 mmol/L. Hypoglycemia occurs when excessive glucose consumption depletes the reserves of glucose in the body. Hypoglycemia can be a result of endocrine or hepatic disorders, a higher energy requirement for glucose, lack of glucose due to fasting, or toxicity. Hypoglycemia will leave dogs feeling weak and groggy. If left untreated, unconsciousness followed by death will result. Hypoglycemia is defined as a low blood sugar concentration. As sugar (in the form of glucose) is the primary energy source in the body, low blood sugar levels will ultimately affect organ and brain function. Symptoms of hypoglycemia will usually begin with low energy and a delayed response time, if left to progress further these symptoms will develop into more serious signs such as seizures and collapse. Potential symptoms include: Loss of appetite Lethargy (low energy) Slow response time Unusual behaviour Polyuria (increased urination) Polydipsia (increased thirst) Lack of coordination Partial paralysis of hindquarters Weakness Exercise intolerance Trembling Involuntary twitching Seizures Unconsciousness Hypoglycemia can be the result of underlying endocrine or hepatic disorders, sudden increase in the use of glucose by the body, inadequate amounts of glucose, or toxicity. Causes include: Abnormal growth of pancreatic cells Cancer in the liver or gastrointestinal system Inflammation of the liver Portosystemic shunt Glycogen-storage disease Excessive strenuous exercise Overuse of glucose in the body during pregnancy Reduced intake of glucose due to starvation or malnutrition Delayed time between meals in ki Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Hypoglycemia Symptoms To Look Out For & Ways To Naturally Treat Them

Uncontrolled glucose levels are one of the most common health problems in the world. Hypoglycemia symptoms frequently affect people with prediabetes or diabetes but are also linked with other health problems, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol and even arthritis. And although it’s rarely mentioned, hypoglycemia has been called “an under-appreciated problem” that’s the most common and serious side effect of glucose-lowering diabetes drugs. (1) Those who are at risk for both hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are not only people who are ill, overweight or inactive — anyone who consumes a poor diet and has trouble with normal glucose metabolism can develop symptoms. The standard American diet, which tends to be very high in things like refined grains and sugar but low in nutrients like healthy fats and fiber, contributes to hypoglycemia and related diseases. What are some clues you might be experiencing hypoglycemia symptoms, and what kind of things can you do to help manage them? Symptoms of hypoglycemia are often confused with other health conditions and can include sudden hunger, irritability, headaches, brain fog and shakiness. By managing your intake of empty calories, improving your diet, and paying attention to how meal timing and exercise affects you, you can help control low blood sugar symptoms and prevent them from returning. What Is Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition caused by low blood sugar levels, also sometimes referred to as low glucose. Glucose is mostly found in carbohydrate foods and those containing sugar and is considered to be one of the most important sources of energy for the body. (2) Here’s an overview of how glucose works once it enters the body and the process of how our hormones regulate blood sugar levels: When we Continue reading >>

Management Of Hypoglycemia During Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus

Management Of Hypoglycemia During Treatment Of Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION Hypoglycemia is an important problem in type 1 diabetes, especially in patients receiving intensive therapy in whom the risk of severe hypoglycemia is increased more than threefold (figure 1) [1-4]. Less commonly, hypoglycemia may also affect patients with type 2 diabetes who take a sulfonylurea or a meglitinide or who use insulin. Identification of patients at risk for hypoglycemia and the prevention and management of hypoglycemia are reviewed here. The clinical manifestations of hypoglycemia and the physiologic response to hypoglycemia are discussed elsewhere. (See "Hypoglycemia in adults: Clinical manifestations, definition, and causes" and "Physiologic response to hypoglycemia in normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus".) BIOCHEMICAL AND CLINICAL CRITERIA In 2013, a workgroup of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the Endocrine Society reconfirmed previously published criteria for the definition and clinical classification of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes mellitus [3]. Definition — In patients with diabetes, hypoglycemia is defined as all episodes of an abnormally low plasma glucose concentration (with or without symptoms) that expose the individual to harm [3]. The workgroup recommended that people with diabetes become concerned about the possibility of hypoglycemia at a self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) level ≤70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L). While that value is higher than the value used to diagnose hypoglycemia in people without diabetes, it approximates the lower limit of the physiologic fasting nondiabetic range, the normal glycemic threshold for glucose counterregulatory hormone secretion, and the highest antecedent low glucose level reported to reduce sympathoadrenal responses to subsequent hypoglycemia [1]. This cut-off Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

Tweet Hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels fall below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Whilst many of us think of diabetes as being a problem of high blood sugar levels, the medication some people with diabetes take medication that can also cause their sugar levels to go too low and this can become dangerous. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia occurs when the level of glucose present in the blood falls below a set point: Below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL) Being aware of the early signs of hypoglycemia will allow you to treat your low blood glucose levels quickly - in order to bring them back into the normal range. It is also recommended to make close friends and family aware of the signs of hypoglycemia in case you fail to recognise the symptoms. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? The main symptoms associated with hypoglycemia are: Sweating Feeling dizzy Symptoms of hypoglycemia can also include: Being pale Feeling weak Feeling hungry A higher heart rate than usual Blurred vision Confusion Convulsions Loss of consciousness And in extreme cases, coma Who is at risk of hypos? Whilst low blood sugar can happen to anyone, dangerously low blood sugar can occur in people who take the following medication: Sulphopnylureas (such as glibenclamide, gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, tolbutamide) Prandial glucose regulators (such as repaglinide, nateglinide) If you are not sure whether your diabetes medication can cause hypos, read the patient information leaflet that comes with each of your medications or ask your doctor. It is important to know whether your diabetes medication puts you at risk of hypos. What are the causes of hypoglycemia? Whilst medication is the main factor involved in hypoglycemia within people with diabetes, a number of other factors can increase the risk of hypos oc Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar Effectively

How To Treat Low Blood Sugar Effectively

Hypoglycemic symptoms are important clues that you have low blood glucose. An episode of hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, comes on very suddenly. It can happen during or after strenuous exercise, or when you delay a meal. Most people with type 2 diabetes learn to recognize their hypoglycemic symptoms. These include: Sweating Weakness Anxiety Trembling Fast heartbeat Inability to think straight Irritability Grouchiness Hunger Headache Sleepiness Hypoglycemic episodes can also happen while you are asleep. Symptoms include: Crying out or having nightmares Waking up to find your pajamas or sheets are damp from perspiration Feeling tired, irritable, or confused after you wake up What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Low If you think your blood glucose may be too low, check your level using your testing equipment. If your blood glucose is less than 70 mg/dL, then you are probably having a hypoglycemic reaction. Hypoglycemia is usually mild and can be treated quickly and easily by eating or drinking a small amount of glucose-rich food. Always carry something to eat in case a hypoglycemic episode happens, such as sugar or glucose tablets, fruit juice, or hard candy. Ask your doctor or certified diabetes educator (CDE) for suggestions about the best form of emergency glucose to have on hand for your particular situation. Next step: Heart Health Risks With Advanced Diabetes Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Treatment

Hypoglycemia Treatment

A The important thing is to get at least 15-20 grams of sugars or carbohydrates. A food's nutrition label can tell you how much you need to eat of that food to get enough to treat an episode of hypoglycemia. To treat hypoglycemia you should stick with something that is mostly sugar or carbohydrates. Foods that have a lot of fat as well as sugars and carbohydrates, such as chocolate or cookies, do not work as quickly to raise blood glucose levels. Foods with 15 grams carbohydrates: 4 oz (1/2 cup) of juice or regular soda 2 tablespoons of raisins 4 or 5 saltine crackers 4 teaspoons of sugar 1 tablespoon of honey or corn syrup Ask your health care professional or dietitian to list foods that you can use to treat low blood glucose. Then be sure you always have at least one type of sugar with you. See All 2 Answers A When symptoms of low blood sugar strike, check your blood sugar level if possible. If you can't because your meter isn't around or the symptoms are coming on too quickly, just go ahead and treat it immediately to prevent your blood glucose from going even lower and possibly causing you to lose consciousness. When you feel the effect of low blood sugar, eat a 15-gram portion of sugar or sugar-containing food. The ideal choice is glucose tablets or a glucose gel, both available at any pharmacy. They're portioned to make it easy to grab 15 grams' worth and don't have to be refrigerated. Keep them in places where you might need them in a hurry, such as next to your bed or couch, at your desk, or in your car. If neither of these is available, the next best choice is four to five pieces of hard candy or ½ cup of fruit juice. After taking the glucose or other sugar-rich food, wait fifteen minutes and check your blood sugar level again. If it's not rising, you can repe Continue reading >>

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

How To Treat A Low Blood Glucose

A blood glucose of less than 70 mg/dl in general is considered a low blood glucose. Because you may feel some of the symptoms of low blood glucose when your glucose is normal, be sure, if possible, to check your blood glucose when you think it is low. The symptoms of a low blood glucose are: Sweaty and shaky Weak Headache Confused Irritable Hungry Pale Rapid heart rate Uncoordinated If your blood glucose is low, follow the steps below to treat: Follow the 15-15 rule: Eat or drink something from the list below equal to 15 grams of carbohydrate (carb). Rest for 15 minutes, then re-check your blood glucose. If it is still low, (below 70), repeat step 1 above. If your next meal is more than an hour away, you will need to eat one carbohydrate choice as a snack to keep your blood glucose from going low again. If you can't figure out why you have low blood glucose, call your healthcare provider, as your medicine may need to be adjusted. Always carry something with you to treat an insulin reaction. Use food from the list below. Foods equal to One Carbohydrate Choice (15 grams of carb): 3 Glucose tablets or 4 Dextrose tablets 4 ounces of fruit juice 5-6 ounces (about 1/2 can) of regular soda such as Coke or Pepsi 7-8 gummy or regular Life Savers 1 Tbsp. of sugar or jelly Call your doctor Call your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a low blood glucose reaction and do not know what caused it. If you pass out If you have type 1 diabetes and you do not take care of low blood glucose, you may pass out. If you do, a drug called glucagon should be injected into your skin, like you do with insulin. This can be done by a family member or friend who has been taught how to do it. Since glucagon may cause you to vomit, you should be placed on your side when the injection is given. I Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Your doctor will use three criteria — often referred to as Whipple's triad — to diagnose hypoglycemia. Whipple's triad includes the following factors: Signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. You may not exhibit signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia during your initial visit with your doctor. In this case, your doctor may have you fast overnight (or for a longer period). This will allow hypoglycemic symptoms to occur so that he or she can make a diagnosis. It's also possible that you'll need to undergo an extended fast in a hospital setting. Or if your symptoms occur after a meal, your doctor will want to test your glucose levels after a meal. Documentation of low blood glucose when the signs and symptoms occur. Your doctor will draw a sample of your blood to be analyzed in the laboratory. Disappearance of the signs and symptoms. The third part of the diagnostic triad involves whether your signs and symptoms go away when blood glucose levels are raised. In addition, your doctor will likely conduct a physical examination and review your medical history. Treatment Treatment of hypoglycemia involves: Immediate initial treatment to raise your blood sugar level Treatment of the underlying condition that's causing your hypoglycemia to prevent it from recurring Immediate initial treatment The initial treatment depends on your symptoms. Early symptoms can usually be treated by consuming 15 to 20 grams of a fast-acting carbohydrate. Fast-acting carbohydrates are foods that are easily converted to sugar in the body, such as candy, fruit juice, regular — not diet — soft drinks, or glucose tablets or gel. Foods containing fat or protein aren't good treatments for hypoglycemia, because protein and fat can slow the body's absorption of sugar. Recheck blood sugar levels 15 minut Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

Hypoglycemia In The Newborn

What is hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the amount of blood glucose (sugar) in the blood is lower than normal (under 50 mg/dL). Who is affected by hypoglycemia in the newborn? Babies who are more likely to develop hypoglycemia include: Babies born to diabetic mothers may develop hypoglycemia after delivery when the source of glucose (via the umbilical cord) is gone and the baby's insulin production metabolizes the existing glucose. Small for gestational age or growth-restricted babies may have too few glycogen stores. Premature babies, especially those with low birthweights, who often have limited glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver) or an immature liver function. Babies born under significant stress. Babies who experience temperature instability (for instance, get cold) or when mothers were treated with certain drugs (for instance, terbutaline) Infants of diabetic mothers Babies who are large for their gestational age. This is associated with gestational diabetes, but also with forms of congenital hyperinsulinism What causes hypoglycemia in the newborn? Hypoglycemia may be caused by conditions that: Lower the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. Prevent or lessen storage of glucose. Use up glycogen stores (sugar stored in the liver). Inhibit the use of glucose by the body. Many different conditions may be associated with hypoglycemia in the newborn, including the following: Inadequate maternal nutrition in pregnancy Excess insulin produced in a baby of a diabetic mother Severe hemolytic disease of the newborn (incompatibility of blood types of mother and baby) Birth defects and congenital metabolic diseases Birth asphyxia Cold stress (conditions that are too cold) Liver disease Infection Why is hypoglycemia in the newborn a con Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

What is hypoglycemia? People who have diabetes and use insulin or diabetes pills can have low blood sugar (glucose). Low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, happens when the level of sugar in the blood falls below 70 mg/dl. Blood sugar drops when there is more insulin than needed to regulate the sugar level. What are the causes of hypoglycemia? Eating meals late or skipping meals. Not eating the whole meal or enough carbohydrates. Being more active than usual. Taking more medicine than needed. Drinking alcohol without eating. Any combination of the above. What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Weakness or shaking. Moist skin, sweating. Fast heartbeat. Dizziness. Sudden hunger. Confusion. Pale skin. Numbness in mouth or tongue. Irritability, nervousness. Unsteadiness. Nightmares, bad dreams, restless sleep. You might pass out if your hypoglycemia is not treated. Continue reading >>

Treating Low Blood Sugar

Treating Low Blood Sugar

You are at risk of having a low blood sugar reaction if you: Skip or delay a meal or snack Take too much insulin or eat too few carbohydrates Exercise Drink alcohol, especially without eating carbohydrates Check your blood sugar if you have any of these symptoms: Weakness and/or fatigue Headache Sweating Anxiety Dizziness Shaking Increased heartbeat If your blood sugar is less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl): Eat 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrate (sample foods listed below) Wait 15 minutes and then recheck your blood sugar If your blood sugar is still less than 100 mg/dl, take another 15 grams of carbohydrate and retest your blood sugar in another 15 minutes. Repeat if necessary. Important: If you have frequent low blood sugars speak to your doctor. You may need changes in your medication and/or meal plan. Quick Carbohydrate Guide for Treating Low Blood Sugars If your blood sugar is less than 70 mg/dl, you need 15 to 30 grams of a quickly absorbed carbohydrate, like the ones listed below. Each of the following servings provides 15 grams of carbohydrate. Candies and Other Sweets 5 small gum drops 12 gummy bears 6 large jelly beans 5 Life Savers 15 Skittles 1 Tablespoon honey, jam or jelly 1 Tablespoon sugar in water 4 Starburst Beverages 1/2 cup apple juice 1/2 cup orange or grapefruit juice 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/2 cup regular soda (not diet) 1/3 cup grape juice 1/3 cup cranberry juice 1/3 cup prune juice 1 cup fat free milk Fruits 1/2 banana 1 small apple 1 small orange 1/2 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons of raisins 15 grapes Other 3 to 4 glucose tablets 1 tube glucose gel Note: The foods listed above are easily absorbed and will raise blood sugar levels quickly. Foods that contain protein or fat — such as chocolate, candy bars, ice cream, cookies, crackers and Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia () when their bodies don't have enough sugar to use as fuel. It can happen for several reasons, including diet, some medications and conditions, and exercise. If you get hypoglycemia, write down the date and time when it happened and what you did. Share your record with your doctor, so she can look for a pattern and adjust your medications. Call your doctor if you have more than one unexplained low blood sugar reaction in a week. Most people feel symptoms of hypoglycemia when their blood sugar is 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower. Each person with diabetes may have different symptoms of hypoglycemia. You'll learn to spot yours. Early symptoms include: Confusion Dizziness Feeling shaky Hunger Headaches Irritability Pounding heart; racing pulse Pale skin Sweating Trembling Weakness Anxiety Without treatment, you might get more severe symptoms, including: Poor coordination Poor concentration Numbness in mouth and tongue Passing out Ask your doctor if any of your medicines can cause low blood sugar. Insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, and so can a type of diabetes medications called "sulfonylureas." Commonly used sulfonylureas include: Glibenclamide (Glyburide, Micronase) Gliclazide Older, less common sulfonlyureas tend to cause low blood sugar more often than some of the newer ones. Examples of older drugs include: You can also get low blood sugar if you drink alcohol or take allopurinol (Zyloprim), aspirin, Benemid, probenecid (Probalan), or warfarin (Coumadin) with diabetes medications. You shouldn't get hypoglycemia if you take alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, biguanides (such as metformin), and thiazolidinediones alone, but it can happen when you take them with sulfonylureas or insulin. You can get low blood sugar Continue reading >>

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Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

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